GridHoster Web Hosting

A

ABBASSIEH
See SICILIAN PRINCE.


ABBOTTS READING
According to the annual volumes of Lloyd's Register for 1839/40-1873/74, the ABBOTTS READING was a bark, built in Liverpool, and luanched in October 1838. Official number: 1500. 421 (from 1864/65: 370) tons; 112 x 26.1 x 18 feet (length x beam x depth of hold). Master: 1839/40-1843/44 - T. White; 1843/44-1847/48 - Atkinson; 1848/49-1854/55 - Johnstone; 1855/56-1856/57 - J. Walsh; 1857/58-1862/63 - Power; 1862/63-1863/64 - O. Prout; 1864/65 - C. Lima; 1864/65-1869/70 - Dumaresq; 1870/71 - R. Chestney; 1871/72-1873/74 - J. Charlton. Owner: 1839/40-1864/65 - Kendall & Co.; 1864/65-1870/71 - Satterfield; 1870/71-1873/74 - R. Hutchinson. Registry: 1839/40-1870/71 - Liverpool; 1870/71-1873/74 - West Hartlepool. Port of Survey: 1839/40-1853/54 - Liverpool; 1854/55 - Swansea; 1856/57-1866/67 - Liverpool; 1866/67-1869/70 - London; 1869/70-1870/71 - Liverpool; 1870/71-1873/74 - Hartlepool. Destined Voyage: 1839/40-1843/44 - Lima; 1843/44 - Calcutta; 1844/45-1845/46 - Calcutta [lined out]; 1846/47-1847/48 - Africa; 1848/49-1853/54 - Valparaiso; 1854/55 - Africa; 1855/56-1856/57 - [not given]; 1857/58-1860/61 - South America; 1861/62 - South America [lined out]; 1862/63-1863/64 - South America; 1864/65 - South America [lined out]; 1865/66 - [not given]; 1866/67-1870/71 - South America; 1870/71-1873/74 - Baltic. Lloyd's Register for 1873/74 contains the annotation "wrecked"; however, I am unable to determine the particulars of the wreck, as the microfilm copy to which I have access of the register of wrecks for 1873-1874 bound in the Parliamentary Papers for 1874 and 1875 is illegible. - [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 20 January 1998]


ABBY LANGDON
The ABBY LANGDON was a 3-masted, square-rigged ship, built in Hallowell, ME, by J. P. Rideout in 1854, and registered at the port of New York on 20 February 1855. 1035 tons; 177' 4" x 35' 5" x 17' 7" (length x beam x depth of hold). In 1855, in addition to her voyage from Havre she also sailed in the "New Orleans Line" of coastal packets between New York and New Orleans [Forrest R. Holdcamper, List of American-Flag Merchant Vessels That Received Certificates of Enrollment or Registry at the Port of New York, 1789-1867 (Record Groups 41 and 36), National Archives Publications No. 68-10, Special Lists, No. 22 (Washington, DC: National Archives and Records Service, 1968), p. 12; William Armstrong Fairburn, Merchant Sail (Center Lovell, ME: Fairburn Marine Educational Foundation, [1945-1955]), V.3326 and 3327; Carl C. Cutler, Queens of the Western Ocean; The Story of America's Mail and Passenger Sailing Lines (Annapolis: United States Naval Institute, c1961), p. 522]. [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 6 November 1997]


ABERGELDIE
I have the following information from the 1887-88 Lloyd's Register of Shipping: ABERGELDIE - Call sign: WJFS. Official registration #: 84358. Master: Captain J. Murray, appointed to the shipping line in 1875 and to the ship in 1882. Rigging: iron single screw steam Barkentine; 1 iron deck & spar deck; 3 tiers of beams; 6 cemented bulkheads. Tonnage: 2,863 tons gross, 1,958 under deck and 1,878 net. Dimensions: 315 feet long, 40.1 foot beam and 20.3 feet deep; water ballast in cellular double bottom 224 feet long and 412 tons. Built: in 1882 by Sunderland Ship Building Co. Ltd. in Sunderland. Propulsion: compound inverted engine with 2 cylinders of 40 & 75 inches diameter respectively; operating at 87 p.s.i.; 300 horsepower; engine built by North East Marine Engine Co. Ltd. in Sunderland. Owners: Adam Steam Ship Co. Ltd. Port of registry: Aberdeen - [Posted to The ShipsList by Gilbert Provost 23 October 1998]


ABYSSINIA
The steamship ABYSSINIA was built by J. & G. Thomson, Glasgow, for the Cunard Line, and launched on 3 March 1870. 3,376 tons; 110,78 x 12,86 meters/363.5 x 42.2 feet (length x breadth); straight stem, 1 funnel, 3 masts; iron construction, screw propulsion, service speed 13 knots; accommodation for 120 passengers in 1st class, and 1,068 (or, if the need arose, 2 battalions of soldiers) in steerage. The ABYSSINIA had a male and female hospital, distilling apparatus which could produce 2,000 gallons of fresh water daily, and holds for 80,000 cubic feet of cargo and 1,200 tons of coal. 24 May 1870, maiden voyage, Liverpool-Queenstown-New York. 18 September 1880, last voyage, Liverpool-Queenstown-New York, for the Cunard Line. 1880, returned to the builders in part payment for the steamships SERVIA and CATALONIA; acquired by the Guion Line. 20 November 1880-27 March 1886, Liverpool-Queenstown-New York, for the Guion Line. 1882, compound engines by J. Jones & Sons, Liverpool. 1887-1891, ran on the Pacific (Vancouver-Yokohama-Shanghai-Hong Kong) for Canadian Pacific. 28 November 1891, resumed Liverpool-Queenstown-New York service. 13 December 1891, sailed from New York for Liverpool. 18 December 1891, destroyed by fire at sea, with no loss of life; the passengers were rescued by the Norddeutscher Lloyd steamship SPREE [Noel Reginald Pixell Bonsor, North Atlantic Seaway; An Illustrated History of the Passenger Services Linking the Old World with the New (2nd ed.; Jersey, Channel Islands: Brookside Publications), vol. 1 (1975), pp. 92. 93. 151; vol. 2 (1978), pp. 705, 707, 710; John Adams, Ocean Steamers; A History of Ocean-going Passenger Steamships, 1820-1970 (London: New Cavendish Books, c1993), p.74 (engraving from the Illustrated London News)]. Also pictured in Michael J. Anuta, Ships of Our Ancestors (Menominee, MI: Ships of Our Ancestors, 1983), p. 1, courtesy of the Alex Shaw Collection, Steamship Historical Society of America, Langsdale Library, University of Baltimore, 1420 Maryland Ave., Baltimore, MD 21201. - [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 30 September 1998]

The "Abyssinia" was built by J&G.Thomson, Glasgow for the British and North American Royal Mail Steam Packet Co. (later Cunard Steam Ship Co). She was a 3,376 gross ton ship, length 363.5ft x beam 42.2ft, straight stem, one funnel, three masts(rigged for sail), iron construction, single screw and a speed of 13 knots. Launched on 3rd Mar.1870, she started her maiden voyage on 24th May 1870 when she left Liverpool for Queenstown (Cobh) and New York. She started her last voyage on this service on 18th Sep.1880 and was returned to the builders in part payment for the new ships "Servia" and "Catalonia". Sold to the Guion Line, she commenced Liverpool - Queenstown - New York sailings on 20th Nov.1880 and in 1882 was fitted with compound engines. Her last voyage on this route started 27th Mar.1886 and between 1887 - 1891 she ran on the Pacific for Canadian Pacific Line. Resumed Liverpool - Queenstown - New York route on 28th Nov.1891 and on 13th Dec.1891, left New York for Liverpool, but was destroyed at sea by fire on 18th Dec. All the passengers and crew were rescued by the German liner "Spree" [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P. Bonsor, vol.1, p.151] - [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 13 October 1998]


ACADIAN
See NESTORIAN.


ACAPULCO
See RIMUTAKA (3)


ACHILLE LAURO
Achille Lauro - Passenger ship built in 1947 by N.V. Koninklijke Maats. "De Schelde", Vlissingen, as the Willem Ruys for N.V. Koninklijke Rotterdamsche Lloyd, Rotterdam. Her dimensions was 631'2" 82'0" 29'2" and tonnage: 23112 GRT and 12401 NRT. - 1938 January: Ordered to be built, but lay uncompleted on the stocks at N.V. Koninklijke Maats. "De Schelde", Vlissingen, for the duration of the war. - 1947: Launched and delivered to N.V. Koninklijke Rotterdamsche Lloyd, Rotterdam. - 1964 January: Sold to Achille Lauro, Naples. - 1965: Renamed Achille Lauro. - 1965 August 29: Suffered considerable damage after a serious fire while at Palermo. - 1966 April: Back in service. - 1972 May 19: The bridge and accomodation was damaged by fire. - 1975 April: Collided with the livestock carrier Yousset which was sunk. - 1981 December 3: A fire occurred in a bar and three passangers were killed during the evacuation. - 1985 October: Taken by Arab terrorists in the Mediterranean who murdered an American passenger. - 1994 November 30: Caught fire off the coast of Somalia en route from Genoa to the Sychelles. The ship was abandoned without loss of life. - 1994 December 2: The burnt out hulk sank. [Posted to the Comunes Of Italy Mailing List by Steve Saviello - 1 October 1997]


ACROPOLIS
See WASHINGTON (4).


ACTIVE
See GOLD HUNTER.


ADA
See AMALFI.


ADALIA
The screw steamer ADALIA was built in 1864 in Sunderland by William Doxford & Sons. 1,270 tons; 231.6 feet long x 32 feet broad x 17.7 feet depth of hold; iron construction. 29 November 1869, made a single round-trip voyage from Liverpool to Charleston, SC, chartered by the Liverpool & Charleston Steamship Line. 24 June 1872, bound from London for Quebec with 120 passengers and a general cargo, wrecked on the south side of St. Paul's Island, Cape Breton [New York Herald, 27 June 1872, 20e; Noel Reginald Pixell Bonsor, North Atlantic Seaway; An Illustrated History of the Passenger Services Linking the Old World with the New (2nd ed.; Jersey, Channel Islands: Brookside Publications), vol. 2 (1978), pp. 727-728]. The Quebec newspapers from 26 June onwards should contain accounts of the wreck. [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 24 July 1997]


ADANA
See MONTEREY (3).

ADELAIDE METCALF
The ship ADELAIDE METCALF, 673 tons, was built in Damariscotta, Maine, in 1849, and registered at New York on 7 May 1850 [Forrest R. Holdcamper, comp., List of American-flag Merchant Vessels that received Certificates of Enrollment or Registry at the Port of New York, 1789-1867 (Record Groups 41 and 36), National Archives Publication 68-10, Special Lists 22 (Washington, DC: National Archives and Records Service, 1968), p. 17]. There is no reference to her in either Fairburn's Merchant Sail or Cutler's Queens of the Western Ocean, so I know nothing about her other than the following 2 voyages to New York: 1852 Apr 29 - Ship ADELAIDE METCALF, of Boston, Scott, master, arrives at New York, 27 days from Antwerp, with 337 passengers to R. W. Trundy. 1855 Mar 27 - Ship ADELAIDE METCALF, Hanson, master, arrives at New York, from Havre 14 Feb 1855, with 136 passengers to Metcalf & Lovejoy. - [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 20 January 1998]


ADMIRAL (1)
The ship ADMIRAL, of New York, Thomas V. Bliffen, master, arrived at New York on 2 December 1852 (passenger manifest dated the following day), from Havre 30 October, with 320 passengers; there had been 2 deaths and 1 birth during the passage. This vessel was built in New York by the celebrated shipbuilder William H. Webb, and launched in 1846. 929 tons; 160 ft 2 in x 35 ft 8 in x 25 ft 4 in (length x beam x depth of hold); 2 decks; draft 19 feet. The ship ran in the Union Line of sailing packets between New York and Havre until the line was dissolved as a consequence of the Civil War in 1863, when she was sold British [Robert Greenhalgh Albion, Square-riggers on Schedule; The New York Sailing Packets to England, France, and the Cotton Ports (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1938), pp. 284-285. 298]. - [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 30 September 1998]

The ADMIRAL was a 3-masted, square-rigged sailing vessel, built in New York by the celebrated shipbuilder William H. Webb, and launched in 1846. 929 tons; 160 ft 2 in x 35 ft 8 in x 25 ft 4 in (length x beam x depth of hold); 2 decks; draft 19 feet. The ship ran in the Union Line of sailing packets between New York and Havre from 1846 until the line was dissolved as a consequence of the Civil War in 1863, during which time her westbound voyages averaged 33 days, her shortest passage being 22 days, her longest 46 days. She was sold British in 1863; I have been unable to find any reference to her in the annual volumes of Lloyd's Register of Shipping, but it should be possible to trace her later history through the annual volumes of the Mercantile Navy List, the official list of British-registered vessels [Robert Greenhalgh Albion, Square-riggers on Schedule; The New York Sailing Packets to England, France, and the Cotton Ports (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1938), pp. 284-285. 298].- [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 10 October 1998]


ADMIRAL (2)
The Bremen ship ADMIRAL, Carl Wieting, master, arrived at New York on 6 December 1852, 50 days from Rotterdam, with 255 passengers. This vessel was built by the shipbuilder Johann Lange, of Vegesack/Grohn, and launched on 23 September 1848. 320 Commerzlasten/744 tons; 39,8 x 9,8 x 6 meters (length x beam x depth of hold). Original owners were the Bremen firms of Hermann Fr. Weinhagen (1/3) and Julius Schaer & Co (2/3--in 1851, 1/3 transferred to Georg Heinr. Wilh. Schaer); the vessel was managed by H. F. Weinhagen. 20 October 1848, maiden voyage, Carl Wieting, master, to New Orleans. The ADMIRAL was engaged in the transport of emigrants to North America and was commanded by Carl Wieting until the early 1860's, when he was succeeded by Johann Friedrich Haeslop. In the early 1870's, the Bremen firm of Anton Fr. Ad. Schaer became managers of the ship, being succeeded in 1878 by Reck & Boyes, who installed H. N. Lauer, from Vegesack, as the last master of the vessel under the German flag. In the mid-1880's, the ship was sold to Westergaard & Hannevig (later Westergaard & Co.), of Christiania, Norway. On 1 April 1891, bound in ballast from Rio de Janeiro to Halifax, the ADMIRAL, now rigged as a bark, was stranded in the vicinity of Ocean City, Maryland, not far from Philadelphia, and became a total loss [Peter-Michael Pawlik, Von der Weser in die Welt; Die Geschichte der Segelschiffe von Weser und Lesum und ihrer Bauwerften 1770 bis 1893, Schriften des Deutschen Schiffahrtsmuseums, Bd. 33 (Hamburg: Kabel, c1993), pp. 215, no. 200, and 216 (oil painting by Oltmann Jaburg, 1872)]. - [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 30 September 1998]


ADMIRAL (3)
See HUNGARIA.


ADMIRAL NAKHIMOV
See BERLIN (3).
The ADMIRAL NACHIMOV was used as a passenger ship on the Black Sea, where she collided with a freighter and sank on 31 August 1986, with the loss of 423 lives [Clas Broder Hansen, Passenger Liners from Germany, 1816-1990 , translated by Edward Force (West Chester, Pennsylvania: Schiffer, c1991) pp. 128-129].. [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 13 December 1997]


ADRIA
See ETNA.


AEOLUS
See GROSSER KURFURST.


AFFON
See LIGURIA.


AFRA
See JUNO.


AFRIC
The "Afric" was a 11,948 gross ton ship, built by Harland & Wolff, Belfast for the White Star Line's Australian trade in 1899. She had one funnel, four masts, refrigerated cargo space for the carriage of frozen meat, twin screws and a speed of 14 knots. There was accommodation for 350 single-class passengers. She commenced her maiden voyage on 8th Feb.1899 when she left Liverpool on a trial run to New York, after which she returned to Belfast for some months to allow alterations to be carried out. On 9th Sept.1899 she sailed from Liverpool for Capetown, Albany, Adelaide, Melbourne and Sydney. She continued on the Australia service until 12th Feb.1917 when she was torpedoed and sunk by a German submarine off the Eddystone Rock, English Channel. [North Star to Southern Cross by John M.Maber] - [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 17 August 1998]


AFRICAN (1)
See SOVEREIGN.


AFRICAN (2)
See CITY OF LIMERICK .


AGAMEMNON
See KAISER WILHELM II (2).


AGIOS NIKOLAOS II
See PATRICIA (2) .


AK-DENIZ
See OLDENBURG.


ALABAMA
See STATE OF ALABAMA.


ALASKA (1)
Built by John Elder & Co, Glasgow in 1881, the "Alaska" belonged to the British owned Guion Line. She was a 6,932 gross ton ship, length 500ft x beam 50ft, straight stem, two funnels, four masts (rigged for sail), iron construction, single screw and a speed of 16 knots. Launched on 15/7/1881, she started her maiden voyage from Liverpool to Queenstown (Cobh) and New York on 30/10/1881. In April 1882 she made a record passage from Queenstown to New York in 6 days, 23 hours, 48 mins. She continued on this service until starting her last voyage on 28/4/1894 and was then laid up in Gareloch. In 1897 she was chartered to the Spanish owned Cia Trasatlantica, renamed "Magallanes" and used for transport work in the Cuban rebellion. Laid up in the River Clyde in 1898, she was sold for scrap in 1899, but was resold and used as an accommodation ship at Barrow. She was eventually scrapped at Preston in 1902. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.2, p.710] - [Email from Ted Finch to Judy Anderson - Submitted by Ted Finch - 28 April 1998]


ALASKA (2)
The ALASKA: SS -liner, built by Delaware River Co. in 1889. The owner was Alaska SS Co She was stranded in fog, abandoned and sank Aug 6, 1921 at Blunts Reef (Cp Mendocino) CA. She carried passengers and freight The Capt. Harry Hobey. The loss of life was 42 --> 211 ?? Rescuer was SS ANYOX. [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Sue Swiggum - 18 September 1997]


ALBA (of 1920)
See SIERRA VENTANA (1) .


ALBANIA (1)
See CITTA DI MILANO.


ALBANIA (2)
See CAIRNRONA.


ALBANY
See MEGANTIC.


ALBERTA
See LAURENTIC (1).


ALBERT BALLIN
The "Albert Ballin" was built by Blohm & Voss, Hamburg in 1922 for the Hamburg America Line. She was a 20,815 gross ton ship, length 602.4ft x beam 78.7ft, two funnels, four masts, twin screw and a speed of 16 knots. Accommodation was provided for 250-1st, 340-2nd and 1,060-3rd class passengers. Launched on 16/12/1922, she sailed from Hamburg on her maiden voyage to Southampton and New York on 5/7/1923. In Feb.1928 she was refitted to carry 1st, 2nd, tourist and 3rd class passengers and on 11/9/1929 commenced her last Hamburg to Boulogne, Southampton and New York voyage before being re-engined to give a speed of 19 knots. On 21/3/1930 she resumed the Hamburg - Southampton - Cherbourg - New York service, carrying 1st, tourist and 3rd class. On 21/12/1933 she commenced her last voyage on this route and on 12/5/1934 she rammed and sank the North Germen Lloyd vessel "Merkur" with the loss of 7 lives. Later the same year she was rebuilt to 21,131 tons, length 645.8ft,speed 20 knots and renamed "Hansa" under the direction of the Nazi government.(Albert Ballin was Jewish.) On 31/10/1935 she resumed the Hamburg - Southampton - Cherbourg - New York run and in March 1936 was refitted to carry cabin, tourist and 3rd class. She commenced her last New York voyage on 27/7/1939 and then became a naval accommodation ship at Gotenhafen. On 6/3/1945 she was sunk by a mine off Warnemunde, initially taken in tow, but failed to reach port. In 1949 she was raised by the Russians, rebuilt at Warnemunde and Antwerp to 23,009 tons and one funnel and in 1953(?) renamed "Sovetsky Sojus". She was damaged by fire prior to her entry into service but was repaired and used on the Vladivostok - Kamchatka route. Still in service in 1979. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.1, p.417] [ Merchant Fleets by Duncan Haws, vol.4, Hamburg America Line] [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 13 December 1997]


ALBONI
The ALBONI was a "medium clipper" ship, designed and built by Mason C. Hill, at Mystic, Connecticut, and launched in October 1852. She was named after Marietta Alboni (1826-1894, the celebrated Italian contralto, who was then in the middle of a tour of America. 917/837 tons (old/new measurement); 156/182 x 37.5 x 21 feet (length between perpendiculars/ overall length x beam x depth of hold). Her figurehead was the image of a dove with an orange branch in its beak. She was originally owned by Charles Mallory, but was purchased shortly after launching by James Bishop & Co of New York for a reported $55,000. The ALBONI was originally employed in the Cape Horn trade, for which she made 4 voyages: 1. Maiden voyage, N. R. Littlefield, master, New York 11/21/1852 - San Francisco 3/31/1853 (130 days); 65 days to the Horn, 99 days to the equator in the Pacific; when 113 days out was within 300 miles of the Golden Gate, being close to the coast in a dense fog for the final 7 days. Return: San Francisco - Callao (51 days) - New York (85 days), with a cargo of guano. 2. Littlefield, master, New York 4/8/1854 - San Francisco 9/1/1854 (146 days); had a very hard time off Cape Horn, being driven back 700 miles and forced to go round the Falkland Islands twice; hove to on one occasion for 9 days; carried skysails for 60 days after passing Cape Horn. Return: San Francisco - Shanghai (52 days); Shanghai 12/1854 - New York in 98 days. 3. Barnaby, master, New York 5/5/1855 - San Francisco 10/21/1855 (169 days elapsed, 165 days net claimed). Return: San Francisco - Shanghai (59 days); Shanghai 1/28/1856 - NY 5/19/1857 (111 days, 93 days from Anjier). 4. Barnaby, master, New York 6/8/1858 - San Francisco 11/8/1858 (153 days elapsed, 150 days net claimed). Return: San Francisco - Shanghai (53 days) - Singapore - Foochow; Foochow 12/24/1859 - Anjier 1/8/1860 - Start Point 4/12/1860 - London 4/16/1860 - New York 1/12/1861 (61 days). The ALBONI was then engaged in trade between New York, Bremen, and Antwerp, the voyage on which Eduard Kohlmann arrived being her first in this new service. After the voyage, Captain Blanke was replaced by Captain Hoyer. About January 1863, the ALBONI was sold to Theodore Ruger, renamed the ELSIE RUGER, and transferred to the Hannoverian flag. She was engaged principally in the trans-Atlantic trade, but made at least one more voyage (in 1864) to the Orient (New York - Hong Kong). In 1868, she was listed as still owned by Ruger, but hailing from Geestemunde. Her name does not appear in ship registers for 1874 [Octavius T. Howe and Frederick C. Matthews, American Clipper Ships, 1833-1858, vol. 1 (Salem, MA: Marine Research Society, 1926), pp. 4-6; Carl C. Cutler, Greyhounds of the Sea; The Story of the American Clipper Ship (New York: Halcyon House, c1930), pp. 237, 357, 419, 473, 486, 494, 500, 512; William Armstrong Fairburn, Merchant Sail (Center Lovell, ME: Fairburn Marine Educational Foundation, [1945-55], II.1508, 1526; III.1659, 1888, 1940, 1963, 1966, 1969, 2018, 2024, 2029, 2030, 2043, 2044, 2045, 2060, 2065, 2097; IV.2231, 2266, 2269 V.2853, 2855, 3072; VI.3629, 3659, 3661, 3747, 3920, 3937, 3942]. [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 25 October 1997]


ALCOA BANNER
See SUNDANCE.


ALDENHAM
See NINEVAH.


ALEPPO
The "Aleppo" was built by J&G.Thomson, Glasgow in 1864 for Cunard Line's Mediterranean service. She was a 2,057 gross ton ship, length 292.5ft x beam 38.2ft, clipper stem, one funnel, two masts (rigged for sail), iron construction, single screw and a speed of 11 knots. Launched on 1/11/1864, she started her first North Atlantic voyage on 15/9/1865 when she sailed from Liverpool for Halifax and New York. Between 1865 and 1871 she sailed mostly between Liverpool, Queenstown (Cobh) and New York, but made many voyages via Boston. Her last Liverpool - Queenstown - New York voyage started on 9/5/1871 and on 20/6/1871 she commenced the first of four Liverpool - Queenstown - Boston voyages. From 1872 she sailed mostly between Liverpool and Mediterranean ports, but between 1877 - 1892 made at least 16 North Atlantic sailings. Fitted with compound engines in 1880 by J.Jack & Co, Liverpool and fitted with triple-expansion engines by J.Howden & Co, Glasgow in 1890. She started her last North Atlantic voyage on 24/3/1892 when she left Liverpool for Boston and was eventually scrapped at Preston in 1909. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P. Bonsor, vol.1, p.148-9] - [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 18 July 1998]


ALESANDRIA
See TWEED.


ALESIA (1)
The steamship ALESIA, built by T. Royden & Sons, Liverpool (engines by G. Forrester & Co, Liverpool) for the Fabre Line, and launched in June 1882. 2,790 tons; 99,97 x 12,31 meters (328 x 40.4 feet; length x beam); straight bow, 1 funnel, 2 masts; iron construction, screw propulsion, service speed 12 knots; accommodation for 18 1st-, and 1,000 3rd-class passengers. 15 October 1882, maiden voyage, Marseilles-Leghorn-Tarragona-Bone-Almeria-Malaga-New York. 17 March 1899, last voyage, Marseilles-Naples-New York and return. February 1899, sold; scrapped [Bonsor, North Atlantic Seaway, vol. 3, p. 1132]. [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 24 September 1997]

The "Alesia" belonged to the French owned Fabre Line. She was a 2,790 gross ton ship, length 328ft x beam 40.4ft, one funnel, two masts, iron construction, single screw and a speed of 12 knots. There was accommodation for 18-1st and 1,000-3rd class passengers. Built by T.Royden & Sons, Liverpool, she was launched in June 1882 and started her maiden voyage on 15th Oct.1883 when she left Marseilles for Leghorn, Tarragona, Bone, Almeria, Malaga and New York. She started her last round voyage between Marseilles, Naples and New York on 17th Mar.1899 and was then sold and scrapped. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P. Bonsor, vol.3, p.1132] - [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 17 September 1998] .


ALESIA (2)
(Of 1917) See PRINZ ADALBERT.


ALESIA (3)
(Of 1919) See LA BRETAGNE.


ALEXANDRA (1)
see MENOMINEE.


ALEXANDRA (2)
See MANCHESTER IMPORTER.


ALEXANDRE SMYERS
See STEINMANN.


ALEXANDRIA (1)
The"ALEXANDRIA" of 1881 was an iron steamship built in 1870 by Robert Duncan & Co. of Port Glasgow. She belonged to Henderson Bros. which later became the Anchor Line. Her dimensions were 1630 tons gross, length 300.5ft x beam 33.2ft. one funnel, three masts single screw and a speed of 10 knots. Accommodation for 70 1st and 600 3rd class passengers. She made her maiden voyage from Glasgow - Mediterranean - New York - Glasgow. In 1871-2 she made two round voyages between Glasgow - Liverpool - St John NB and then four round voyages Glasgow - NY. Between 1870 and 1892 she made 64 trips Glasgow - Mediterranean - NY - Glasgow. In 1892 her tonnage was increased to 2017 tons and in 1892 made her last voyage Denia - Malaga - NY. She was scrapped in 1895. In 1880, she was involved with the saving of 53 passengers and crew in mid-Atlantic from the Wilson Liner "Hindoo" which foundered in hurricane conditions. [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Ted Finch - 23 July 1997]


ALEXANDRIA (2)
In the 1905-06 Lloyd's Register of Shipping, I found the following information :ALEXANDRIA Official registration # : 85768 Rigging : wood paddle steamer. Tonnage : 863 tons gross and 507 tons net. Dimensions : 173.7 feet long, 30.6 foot beam and holds 8.4 feet deep. Built : in 1883 by A. Cantin in Montreal. Owners : A.W. Hepburn Port of registration : Montreal Flag : British. Her owner was Arthur W. Hepburn of Picton, Ontario. He sailed the Alexandria under the corporate name of Lake Ontario Navigation Co. Ltd..- [Posted to The ShipsList by Gilbert Provost - 8 October 1998]


ALEX STEPHENS
See GENERAL R. M. BLATCHFORD .


ALFONSO XII
See HAVEL.


ALFONSO XIII
See OCEANA.


ALFRED
The ALFRED, variously described as a ship or a bark, was built in Lulea, Sweden, in 1842, and was originally named AUSTRALIA. On 30 November 1844, she was purchased from Liliewalch of Stockholm by the Hamburg firm of Joh. Ces. Godeffroy & Sohn, who renamed her ALFRED, despite the fact that the firm already owned another vessel of this name. 225 Commerzlasten; 133.5 x 32.8 x 19.11 Hamburg Fusse (1 Hamburg Fuss =3D .2=86 meters) length x beam x depth of hold, "zwischen den Steven".. Masters: 1847-1847 - J. Lafrenz; 1847-1851 - H. E. Decker; 1851-1854 - H. Bruhns. Voyages: 1845 - New Orleans; 1845-1846 - Valparaiso/Lima; 1846-1847 - Havre/intermediate ports/New York; 1847-1848 - Arracan/London; 1848-1849 - Adelaide/Callao; 1849-1850 - Adelaide/intermediate ports/London; 1851-1852 - New York/Valparaiso; 1852-1853 - Valdivia/Valparaiso/Iquique; 1853-1854 - Melbourne/intermediate ports/Antwerp. The ALFRED was sold to Norwegian interests in 1855, renamed RHEA, and placed under the command of Capt. Eckersberg. I have no information on her later history or ultimate fate [Walter Kresse, ed., Seeschiffs-Verzeichnis der Hamburger Reedereien, 1824-1888, Mitteilungen aus dem Museum fur Hamburgische Geschichte, N. F., Bd. 5. (Hamburg: Museum fur Hamburgische Geschichte, 1969), vol. 1, p. 165].- [Posted to the Emigration=Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 18 August 1998]


ALGERIA (1)
The vessel scrapped in 1903 was built in 1870 as the ALGERIA for Cunard, and sailed on her Liverpool-Queenstown-New York service. She was purchased in 1882 by the Red Star Line, and renamed PENNLAND, under which name she spent the rest of her career. She never sailed in Mediterranean waters. [Posted to The Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 19 November 1997]


ALGERIA (2)
The "Algeria" was built by D & W.Henderson Ltd, Glasgow in 1891 for the Anchor Line of Glasgow. She was a 4,510 gross ton ship, length 375ft x beam 46.3ft. one funnel, two masts, single screw and a speed of 12 knots. There was accommodation for 26-1st and 1,100-3rd class passengers. Launched on 6/10/1891 for the Indian service, she left Glasgow on her maiden voyage to Liverpool (dep.4/3/1891) and Calcutta. She continued on this service until 1895 when she was transferred on 21/5/1896 to the Naples - Gibralter - New York route. She completed 2 round voyages on this service and then, from 1896-1901 returned to the Glasgow - Liverpool - Bombay or Calcutta run. On 28/2/1902 she commenced her first voyage from Leghorn to Naples and New York and stayed on this service until starting her final voyage on 12/11/1908. (34 round voyages on this route). She was sold to a German company on 12/8/1912 and was renamed "Cyrill" and in 1914 went to the Italian company, Societa Italiana di Navigazione Lloyd Mediterraneo, who renamed her "Virginia". She was finally scrapped in 1923. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.1,p.465] [Merchant Fleets in Profile by Duncan Haws, vol.9, Anchor Line] [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 19 November 1997]

The vessel ALGERIA, built by D & W Henderson Ltd, Glasgow, for the Anchor Line's Indian service, and launched on 6 October 1891. 4,510 tons; 114,29 x 14,11 meters (375 x 46.3 feet, length x beam); straight bow, 1 funnel, 2 masts; steel construction, screw propulsion, service speed 12 knots; passenger accommodation: 26 1st- and 1,100 steerage-class. 1892, maiden voyage, Glasgow- Liverpool (departed 4 March)-Calcutta. 1892-1895, Indian service. 21 May 1896, first voyage, Naples-Gibraltar-New York. 19 July 1896, last voyage, Marseilles-Leghorn-Naples-Gibraltar-New York (2 voyages). 1896-1901, Glasgow-Liverpool-Bombay or Calcutta. 28 February 1902, first voyage, Leghorn-Naples-New York. 12 November 1908, last voyage, Leghorn-Naples-New York (34 roundtrip voyages). 12 August 1912, purchased by a German firm and renamed CYRILL. 1914, purchased by an Italian firm and renamed VIRGINIA. 1923, scrapped [Noel Reginald Pixell Bonsor, North Atlantic Seaway; An Illustrated History of the Passenger Services Linking the Old World with the New (2nd ed.; Jersey, Channel Islands: Brookside Publications), vol. 1 (1975), p. 465. For a photograph of this vessel, contact the Steamship Historical Society of America, Langsdale Library, University of Baltimore, 1420 Maryland Ave., Baltimore, MD 21201. [Posted to The Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 19 November 1997]


ALGERIE
See ORLANDO.


ALICE
See ASIA.


ALIQUIS
According to Ian Hawkins Nicholson, Log of logs; a catalogue of logs, journals, shipboard diaries, letters, and all forms of voyage narratives, 1788 to 1988, for Australia and New Zealand and surrounding oceans, Roebuck Society Publication No. 41 (Yaroomba, Qld: The Author jointly with the Australian Association for Maritime History, [1990]), p. 16, papers concerning two voyages of the ALIQUIS (Liverpool 23 May 1855 - Adelaide 12 August 1855, and Plymouth 4 June 1856 - Adelaide 26 August 1856) are held in the Public Record Office of South Australia, Adelaide, GRG 35/48/1855. The ALAQUIS was a 3-masted, square-rigged sailing ship, built under special survey by John Munn, Quebec, in 1854. 1150/1247 tons (1875: 1125/1125/1032 tons, net/gross/under deck); measurements given variously 185.9 x 36.3 x 22.9 [Lloyd's Register, 1863]/184.9 x 35.7 x 22.9 [Lloyd's Register, 1875]/181 x 32.30 x 22.90 [Wallace]/182 x 32 x 23 [Marcil] feet (length x breadth x depth of hold). Originally registered at Quebec, but re-registered at Liverpool 29 August 1854 [National Archives of Canada, RG 42 Volume 1409, Original References, Vol.# 198 Reel # C-2062]. Official number: 535; signal code: HDGQ. The following is taken from the annual volumes of Lloyd's Register of Shipping for 1855/56-1880/81: Master: 1855/56-1860/61 - T. Pain; 1861/62-1864/65 - Scancroft [1861/62-1862/63 "Scowcroft"]; 1864/65-1867/68 - J. Davidson; 1867/68-1879/80 - F. Marshall; 1880/81 - [not given]. Owner: 1855/56-1878/79 - G. Marshall [1855/56-1857/58 "Marshall &"]; 1879/80 - G. Marshall [lined out]; 1880/81 - [not given]. Port of Registry: 1855/56-1878/79 - London; 1879/80-1880/81 - Amsterdam. Port of Survey: 1855/56-1857/58 - Liverpool; 1858/59-1868/69 - London; 1868/69-1869/70 - Liverpool; 1869/70-1870/71 - Liverpool [lined out] / Clydeside; 1871/72 - Clydeside; 1873/74-1874/75 - London / Liverpool; 1875/76-1876/77 - London; 1877/78 - Clydeside [last survey in Great Britain, 6/1877]. Destined Voyage [-1873/74]: 1855/56-1857/58 - Adelaide; 1858/59 - India; 1859/60-1860/61 - [not given]; 1861/62-1864/65 - India; 1865/66 - India [lined out]; 1866/67 - [not given]; 1868/69-1872/73 - India; 1873/74 - Guatemala. From the entries in Lloyd's Register for 1879/80 and 1880/81, it appears that the ALIQUIS was "sold Dutch" in approximately 1879/80, and re-registered, under the Dutch flag, at Amsterdam. For her later history you shall therefore need to consult the annual volumes of the Registre Veritas, the publication of the Bureau Veritas, the Continental classification society; these volumes are available, on microfilm, at the Australian National Maritime Museum library, in Sydney, which is also your best source for a picture of the ALIQUIS (see the ANMM subject guide Pathfinder No.2:
Immigration Sailing Ships). Since the ALIQUIS was built under special survey, the records of this survey survive among the Lloyd's Register of Shipping survey reports deposited in the National Maritime Museum, Greenwich, London SE10 9NF; there is a microfilm copy of these records in the Canadian National Archives, Reel # A-434 Survey # 102. Additional sources: Canadian Ship Information Database; Frederick William Wallace, Record of Canadian shipping; a list of squarerigged vessels, mainly 500 tons and over, built in the Eastern Provinces of British North America from the year 1786 to 1920 (London: Hodder & Stoughton, 1929), also aaccessible online ; Eileen Marcil, The Charley-Man: a history of wooden shipbuilding at Quebec, 1763-1893 (Kingston, Ontario: Quarry Press, 1993). - [Posted to the Australia Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 21 January 1998]


ALIYA
See JERUSALEM.


ALLEMANIA
The "Allemania" was a 2,695 gross ton ship built in 1865 by C.A.Day & Co, Southampton for the Hamburg America Line. Her details were - length 315ft x beam 41ft, one funnel, two masts (rigged for sail), iron construction, single screw and a speed of 12 knots. There was accommodation for 60-1st, 100-2nd and 600-3rd class passengers. Launched on 11/5/1865, she sailed from Hamburg on her maiden voyage to Southampton and New York on 17/9/1865. In 1872 she was fitted with compound engines and commenced her last voyage to New York on 5/10/1872. She was then transferred to the Hamburg - West Indies service until 11/4/1880, when she resumed the Hamburg - New York run. On 5/9/1880 she commenced her last voyage (3 round voyages) and was then sold to the British company, Hunter & Co.who renamed her "Oxenholme". In 1894 she was sold to A.Chapman and on 6/6/1894 was abandoned with no loss of life after striking rocks near Santa Catharina, Brazil. Be careful if ordering a photograph that you specify the date of the vessel as this company had another "Allemania" built in 1881 and an "Allemannia" bought in 1905. [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 18 October 1997]

The steamship ALLEMANNIA (I) was built by C. A. Day & Co, Southampton (Ship No. 23), for the Hamburg American Line, and launched on 11 May 1865. 2,695 tons; 96 x 12,5 meters/315 x 41 feet (length x breadth); straight bow, 1 funnel, 2 masts; iron construction, screw propulsion, service speed 12 knots; accommodation for 60 passengers in 1st class, 100 in 2nd class, and 600 in steerage; crew of 90. 17 September 1865, maiden voyage, Hamburg-Southampton-New York. 1872, compound engines by Reiherstiegweft, Hamburg. 5 October 1872, last voyage, Hamburg-New York. Hamburg-New Orleans, then Hamburg-West Indies service. 11 April-11 September 1880, resumed Hamburg-New York service (3 roundtrip voyages). 1880, purchased by W. Hunter & Co, Liverpool, and renamed OXENHOLME. 1894, sold to A. Chapman, Liverpool. 6 June 1894, bound to South America, stranded near Santa Catharina, Brazil, with no loss of life [Arnold Kludas and Herbert Bischoff, Die Schiffe der Hamburg- Amerika- Linie, Bd. 1: 1847-1906 (Herford: Koehler, 1979), p. 26 (photograph, the earliest known of any Hamburg American Line vessel); Noel Reginald Pixell Bonsor, North Atlantic Seaway; An Illustrated History of the Passenger Services Linking the Old World with the New (2nd ed.; Jersey, Channel Islands: Brookside Publications), vol. 1 (1975), p. 388]. Also pictured in Michael J. Anuta, Ships of Our Ancestors (Menominee, MI: Ships of Our Ancestors, 1983), p. 5, courtesy of the Peabody Essex Museum, East India Square, Salem, MA 01970 - [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 28 February 1998]


ALLER
SS ALLER, built in 1885 by Fairfield Co. Ltd., Glasgow. 4,966 tons; 133,53 meters (438.1 feet) long x 14,56 meters (47.8 feet) broad; straight bow, 2 funnels, 4 masts; screw propulsion, service speed 17 knots. 18 February 1886, launched. 24 April 1886, maiden voyage, Bremen-Southampton-New York. 1897 masts reduced to two. 18 September 1897, last voyage, Bremen- Southampton-New York. 21 October 1897, first voyage, Genoa-Naples-New York. 16 November 1902, last voyage, Genoa- Naples-New York. 1902 sold; 1904 scrapped [Noel Reginald Pixell Bonsor, North Atlantic Seaway; An Illustrated History of the Passenger Services Linking the Old World with the New (2nd ed.; Jersey, Channel Islands: Brookside Publications), vol. 2 (1978), pp. 552-553. Pictured in Michael J. Anuta, Ships of Our Ancestors (Menominee, MI: Ships of Our Ancestors, 1983; reprint Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., [1993]), p. 5, courtesy of Mystic Seaport Museum, 50 Greenmanville Ave., Mystic, CT 06355-0990 [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 28 July 1997]


ALLIANCE
The S.S. Alliance was operated by the Panama Railroad Steamship Line.And was the first commerical Passenger Ship to transit the Gatun Locks.She was used as a TEST to see how the Gatun Locks would operate. (Gatun Locks is the first set of Locks on the Atlantic Ocean side of the Panama Canal) This test was made June 8,1909. The only other info I have on this ship is that she was 3905 Gross tons and was built in 1886. She operated from New York to the Panama Canal, under the U.S. flag. This shipping company is no longer in operation.They stopped operating in 1981. - [Posted to The ShipsList by Captain C.J.Carroll - 5 July 1998]


ALMERIANA
See CATANIA (2) .


ALPHACCA
See CHANUTE VICTORY.


ALSATIA (1)
See FRISIA.


ALSATIA (2)
The "Alsatia" was built in 1876 by D & W.Henderson, Glasgow for the Anchor Line. She was a 2,810 gross ton ship, length 356.7ft x beam 36.2ft, straight stem, one funnel, three masts, iron construction, single screw and a speed of 13 knots. There was accommodation for 156-cabin class and 538-steerage passengers. Launched in January 1876 she sailed from Glasgow on 8th Apr.1876 on her maiden voyage to Moville and New York. She started her ninth and last voyage on this route on 10th Mar.1877 and on 16th Jun.1877 commenced London - New York sailings. She made 39 round voyages on this service, the last starting on 8th Mar.1882 and in Nov.1882 sailed from Glasgow for Marseilles, Naples, Palermo and New York. In Nov.1882 she sailed Glasgow - Liverpool - Bombay and in Apr.1883 Glasgow - Liverpool - Calcutta. Between 1884-1885 she made four Glasgow - New York sailings and in 1886 was fitted with triple expansion engines and her accommodation refitted to carry 156-1st and 1,100-3rd class passengers. Between 1882-1901 she made 57 Mediterranean - New York voyages, her last starting on 11th May 1901 when she left Kalamata for Patras, Palermo and New York (arr.11/6).On 1st Nov.1901 she was sold to Khedivial Mail and renamed "Minieh" and in 1914 was sold to the British Admiralty for use as a blockship. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P. Bonsor, vol.1, p.460] [Merchant Fleets by Duncan Haws, vol.9, Anchor Line] - [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 30 September 1998]


ALSATIAN
See EMPRESS OF FRANCE (1).


ALSTERFEE
See ORANASIA .


ALSTROM
The "ALSTROM" plied the east coast and the Atlantic in the 1920's and 1930's. Some history .....built in 1903 for Sir William Garth Waite in Sunderland, England, and registered at Montreal.Registered 1921-22 with Loyds of London.1923-24 owned by the Marine Navigational Co. of Canada, reg Montreal.Sold 1925-26 and name change to "Kenoyene Maru" to a Japanese Co......re Maritime Musuem of Halifax. - [Posted to The ShipsList by Angus Elliott - 8 June 1998]


ALVAREZ CABREL
See SICILIAN PRINCE.


AMALFI
The "Amalfi" was built by M.Pearse & Co, Stockton in 1881 for the Sloman Line of Hamburg. She was a 2,345 gross ton ship, length 300.5ft x beam 36.1ft, one funnel, three masts, iron construction, single screw and a speed of 11 knots. There was passenger accommodation for 600-3rd class. Launched on 7/5/1881, she sailed on the Hamburg - Australia service until 1886 when she came under the control of the newly formed Union Line. She commenced her first Hamburg - New York voyage on 19/5/1886 and started her last voyage on this service on 27/7/1898. In 1911 she was sold to Swedish owners and renamed "Ada". On 9/6/1917 she was torpedoed and sunk by the German submarine U.61, while 25 miles east of Fair Isle. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P. Bonsor, vol.3, p.1166] - [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 14 May 1998]


AMAZON
AMAZON: side-wheel packet, wood hull, built Jeffersonville, Indiana, 1847, and possibly rebuilt at Pittsburgh 1849. 250 feet long x 32 feet broad. Engine cylinders 20 inches inside, length of piston stroke 6 feet. Three boilers allowed 115 psi. She had St. Louis owners. Snagged at Rattlesnake Springs, three miles above the mouth of the Missouri River, February 15, 1856, having shortly before been sold to Menard Chouteau. Frederick Way, comp., Way's Packet Directory, 1848-1994; Passenger Steamboats of the Mississippi River System Since the Advent of Photography in Mid-continent America (revised paperback edition; Athens, Ohio: Ohio University, 1994), p. 18, no. 0222 [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 16 July 1997]


AMAZZONE
See OHIO (3).


AMBOIN
See SARDINIA.


AMEDEO
See PLATA.


AMELIA THOMPSON
AMELIA THOMPSON, Barque, 477 Tons. sailed from Plymouth, 25th March 1841, arrived 3rd Sept, 1841 under the command of William Dawson. James Evans was Surgeon Superintendent. Wm. Thompson was the owner and Osberth Forsyth, the broker. Height between decks 6 and a half feet. John Watson first Mate, Murray second mate. William Black in charge of stores. This was the second of the 6 ships chartered by the Plymouth Company for the transport of goods and colonists to the newly founded settlement of New Plymouth, New Zealand. She was not engaged in the Australian trade route. The AMELIA THOMPSON crossed the equator on 23 April 1841 but the prevailing south winds carried them far to the west and no progress was being made so the decision was made to break the monotony of the voyage and make for Bahia (Salvador), Brazil. After 4 days of replenishing the ship they sailed east around the Cape of Good Hope and passing through Bass Straight, Australia July 15 finally reached the New Zealand coast 28 July. 5 days were spent between being becalmed and stormy weather which would not allow them into either Port Underwood (south) or Port Nicholson (north). Eventually they reached Wellington where they spent two weeks. On 13 August they sailed for New Plymouth but experienced similar conditions, having to shelter in tempestuous weather or were becalmed, reaching their destination 3 Sept. It took 13 days to unload passengers and goods as the ship lay many miles off shore as because of danger from currents, surf and reefs. Some of the longboats arrived in darkness and some were overturned but no lives were lost. It is reported there were 7 births and 7 deaths on the voyage. From there the ship returned to London via Batavia and Madras.[Posted to The ShipsList by Lorrie Carter - 10 October 1997]


AMERICA (1)
The Norddeutscher Lloyd [North German Lloyd] ship,SS America, built by Caird & Co. of Greenock in 1862. She was an iron built vessel with a clipper stem, one funnel, three masts, single screw and a speed of 11 knots. Her dimensions were 2752 gross tons, length 318ft x beam 40ft. There was accommodation for 76-1st, 107-2nd and 480-3rd class passengers. She was launched in November 1862 and on 25/5/1863 she left Bremen on her maiden voyage to Southampton and New York. In 1871, her engines were compounded at Southampton and on 27/1/1894 she sailed from Bremen to NY and Baltimore on her last voyage for this company. Sold to an Italian company in 1894 she was renamed ""Orazio" and was scrapped at Spezia in 1895. [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Ted Finch - 14 August 1997]

This vessel is the Norddeutscher Lloyd steamship AMERICA, built by Caird & Co, Greenock, Scotland, and launched in November 1862. 2,752 tons; 96,92 x 12,19 meters (318 x 40 feet, length x beam); clipper bow, 1 funnel, 3 masts; iron construction, screw propulsion, service speed 11 knots; passenger accommodation: 76 1st-, 107 2nd-, and 480 steerage-class. 25 May 1863, maiden voyage, Bremen-Southampton-New York. 1871, engines compounded by Day, Summers & Co, Southampton. 27 January 1894, last voyage, Bremen-New York-Baltimore. 1894, sold to an Italian company and renamed ORAZIO. 1895, scrapped at Spezia [Noel Reginald Pixell Bonsor, North Atlantic Seaway; An Illustrated History of the Passenger Services Linking the Old World with the New (2nd ed.; Jersey, Channel Islands: Brookside Publications), vol. 2 (1978), p. 545. Pictured in Michael J. Anuta, Ships of Our Ancestors (Menominee, MI: Ships of Our Ancestors, 1983), p. 6, courtesy of the Peabody Essex Museum, East India Square, Salem, MA 01970. For additional information on the AMERICA, including pictures, see the following: 1. Arnold Kludas, Die Seeschiffe des Norddeutschen Lloyd, Bd. 1: 1857 bis 1919 (Herford: Koehler, c1991). 2. Edwin Drechsel, Norddeutscher Lloyd Bremen, 1857-1970; History, Fleet, Ship Mails (2 vols.; Vancouver: Cordillera Pub. Co., c1994-c1995). [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 19 November 1997]

The 1887-88 edition of the Lloyd Register of Shipping lists the following details: America. Call sign: QRVP Single screw steamer made of iron rigged as a Bark. Master: Captain Bodcker. Tonnage: 2,752 tons gross and 1,794 tons net. Dimensions: 328.8 feet in length, 40 feet in breadth and 33.1 feet in depth. Built in 1863 by Caird & Co. in Greenock for the Norddeutscher Lloyd. Port of registry: Bremen. Engine with 2 cylinders of 56 in. and 96 in. of diameter respectively. Stroke of 48 inches. 700 horsepower. Fitted with new engine in 1872. Engine built by Day, Summers and Co. in Southampton.
North Atlantic Seaway, Vol 2, by N.R.P. Bonsor lists: America. Single screw iron steamer with clipper bow, 1 funnel and 3 masts. 2,752 gross tons, 328.8 feet long X 40 foot beam. Inverted engine with 2 cylinders. Service speed of 11 knots. Accommodations for 76 passengers in first class, 107 in second and 480 in third class. Launched in November 1862. Maiden voyage on May 25, 1863, Bremen-Southampton-New York. In 1871 engine compounded by Day, Summers and Co. in Southampton. On December 22, 1892 she made her last voyage Bremen to New York. She was sold in 1893 to Sir W.G. Armstrong, Mitchell & Co. in partial exchange for the H. H. Meier. She was scrapped in 1896. - [Posted to The ShipsList by Gilbert Provost - 31 August 1998]


AMERICA (2)
The "America" of 1881 was built by C.Mitchell & Co, Walker-on-Tyne for the Carr Line of Hamburg. She was a 2,118 gross ton ship, length 298.4ft x beam 36ft, one funnel, two masts, iron construction, single screw and a speed of 10 knots. There was accommodation for 800-3rd class passengers. Launched on 28/6/1881, she sailed on her maiden voyage from Hamburg to New York on 1/9/1881. She commenced her third and last voyage when she left Hamburg on 1/1/1882, sailed from New York on 1/2/1882 and went missing with the loss of 34 lives. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.3, p.1073] [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 29 November 1997]


AMERICA (3)
(of 1901) See BRITANNIA (3).


AMERICA (4)
(of 1917) See AMERIKA (2).


AMERICA (5)
There is a site on the SS America under her later name of "Australis".. It gives a detailed history, photos and several links to other sites. Brief specifications are - 26,454 gross tons, length overall 723ft x beam 93.5ft, two funnels, two masts, twin screw and a speed of 22 knots. Accommodation for 516-1st, 371-cabin and 159-tourist class passengers. Built by Newport News Shipbuilding & Dry Dock Co. Launched 31/8/1939, maiden voyage 10/8/1940 New York - Caribbean Cruise. 1941 renamed "West Point" (US troopship). 1946 renamed "America" and sailed New York - Cobh - Southampton - Havre (later Cherbourg). 1964 sold to Chandris Line (Panama) and renamed "Australis". 1976 transferred to Greek flag. 1978 went to Venture Cruise Line, New York and renamed "America". August 1978 repurchased by Chandris Line, renamed "Italis". Forward funnel removed. Final details are found atthe above web site. - [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 15 May 1998].


AMERICAN BANKER
See AROSA KULM.


AMERIKA (1)
(of 1848) See NORDAMERIKA.


AMERIKA (2)
The "Amerika" of 1912 was built by Harland & Wolff, Belfast in 1905 for the Hamburg America Line. She was a 22,225 gross ton ship, length 669ft x beam 74.3ft, two funnels, four masts, twin screw and a speed of 18 knots. There was passenger accommodation for 386-1st, 150-2nd, 222-3rd and 1,750-4th class. She carried a crew of 577. Launched on 20/4/1905, she was the largest ship in the world at the time. On 11/10/1905 she sailed from Hamburg on her maiden voyage to Dover, Cherbourg and New York. In 1907 she was rebuilt to 22,621 tons and on 4/10/1912 collided with and sank the British submarine B.2 off Dover with the loss of 15 lives. On 9/5/1914 she started her last Hamburg - Southampton - Cherbourg - New York crossing and on 10/6/1914 she commenced Hamburg - Boulogne - Southampton - Boston sailings. Her last voyage to Boston commenced on 14/7/1914 (arr 24/7/1914) and she remained in Boston until April 1917 when she was seized by the US authorities, renamed "America" and was used as an army transport. Between 1917-18 she made 9 trooping voyages to France and on 14/7/1918 collided with and sank the British ship "Instructor" with the loss of 16 lives. On Oct.15th 1918 she sank at Hoboken pier during coaling due to bad trim with the loss of 6 lives, and was refloated on 21/11/1918. She was laid up in September 1919 and on 20/1/1920 she sailed from New York via Panama to Vladivostock (arr 20/4/1920) and embarked 6,500 troops for Trieste via Suez. On 8/9/1920 she arrived in New York with 2,666 emigrants from the Mediterranean. In 1921 she was converted to oil fuel and chartered to US Mail with accommodation for 225-1st, 425-2nd and 1,500-3rd class passengers and on 25/6/1921 commenced sailing between New York, Plymouth, Cherbourg and Bremen and commenced her third and last voyage on this service on 27/8/1921. In late 1921 she went to the United States Line and commenced her first voyage for these owners on 28/9/1921 when she left New York for Plymouth, Cherbourg, Bremen, Southampton, Cherbourg, Queenstown (Cobh) and New York. She was reconditioned in June 1923 to 21,114 tons and with passenger accommodation for 692-cabin and 1,056-3rd class. On March 10th 1926 she was gutted by fire while being refitted at Newport News and was rebuilt to 21,329 tons, and with passenger accommodation for 835-cabin, 516-tourist and 3rd class. She resumed New York - Plymouth - Cherbourg - Bremen sailings on 21/3/1928 and on 25/8/1931 commenced her last Hamburg - Southampton - Cherbourg - New York (arr 4/9/1931) crossing. She was then laid up in the reserve fleet at Chesapeake Bay until 1940 when she became a US army accommodation ship for 1,200 troops at St John's NF. In January 1941 she was renamed "Edmund B.Alexander" and became a troop transport between New Orleans and Panama. At this time she was only capable of 10 knots and in 1942-3 was rebuilt with one funnel, her mast heights reduced and her engines converted by the Bethlehem Steel Corp, Baltimore to give her a speed of 17 knots. She then operated between New York and Europe with accommodation for 5,000 troops. In March 1946 she was altered to accommodate military dependents (904 adults and 314 children) between New York and Europe. In 1949 she was laid up at Baltimore and in 1951 in the Hudson River. In January 1957 she was sold to the Bethlehem Steel Corp, towed to Baltimore and scrapped. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.1,p.411] [ Merchant Fleets by Duncan Haws, vol.4, Hamburg America Line] - [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 13 February 1998]


AMERIQUE (1)
The "Amerique" was built by Chantier de Penhoet (under supervision of Scott & Co), St Nazaire in 1864. She was a 4,585 gross ton ship, length 400ft x beam 44ft, straight stem, two funnels, three masts (rigged for sail), iron construction, single screw and a speed of 12 knots. She was laid down as the "Atlantique" but was launched on 23/4/1864 as the "Imperatrice Eugenie" for the Compagnie Generale Transatlantique (French Line). When launched, she was a 3,200 gross ton ship, length 346.6ft x beam 44ft, two funnels, two masts, paddle wheel propulsion and a speed of 12 knots. She sailed from St Nazaire on her maiden voyage to Vera Cruz on 16/2/1865 and stayed on this service until 1873. She was then lengthened to 400ft by A.Leslie & Co, Hebburn-on-Tyne, re-engined and converted to single screw propulsion and had a third mast fitted. Renamed "Amerique", she started her first Havre - New York voyage on 16/1/1874. On 14/4/1874 she was abandoned near the French coast and was towed to Plymouth. Resumed Havre - New York sailings on 13/3/1875 and in March 1876 was fitted with external electric lighting (to replace oil lamps). On 7/1/1877 she stranded at Seabright, NJ, but was refloated on 10th April and resumed Havre - New York crossings on 11/8/1877. She commenced her last voyage on this service on 1/5/1886 and on 22/9/1886 commenced her first Havre - Panama voyage. Fitted with internal electric lights in 1888 and with triple expansion engines in 1892. On 28/1/1895 she was wrecked at Savanilla. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.2,p.654] - [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 23 February 1998]


AMERIQUE (2) (of 1926)
SIERRA VENTANA (1) .


AMITY
The Black Ball packet ship AMITY (382 tons, built in New York by F.Cheeseman in 1816), 37 days out of Liverpool, was wrecked on Squam Beach, New Jersey, near Manasquan, on 24 April 1824 [Robert Greenhalgh Albion, Square-riggers on Schedule; The New York Sailing Packets to England, France, and the Cotton Ports (Princeton, Princeton University Press, 1938), pp. 220 and 276-277]. [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer]


AMPHION
See KOLN (2).


AMROTH
see ARUNDEL CASTLE.


AMSTERDA
See AMSTERDAM (2).


AMSTERDAM (1)
The "Amsterdam" of 1881 was a 2949 gross ton vessel, built by A.McMillan & Son, Dumbarton, Scotland in 1879 for the Holland America Line. Her details were - length 320.3ft x beam 39.1ft, one funnel, two masts, iron construction, single screw and a speed of 10 knots. There was accommodation for 46-1st, and 648-3rd class passengers. Launched on 17/12/1879, she left Rotterdam on her maiden voyage to New York on 27/3/1880. Her final voyage commenced on 29/4/1882 when she sailed from Amsterdam to New York and was wrecked on Sable Island, Nova Scotia on 30/7/1884 with the loss of 3 lives. [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Ted Finch - 5 October 1997]


AMSTERDAM (2)
The "Amsterdam" of 1888 was built by Harland & Wolff, Belfast in 1879 as the "British Crown" for British shipowners, but was immediately chartered to the American Line. She was a 3,563 gross ton vessel, length 410.3ft x beam 39ft, one funnel, four masts, iron construction, single screw and a speed of 12 knots. Launched on 2/8/1879, she sailed from Liverpool on her maiden voyage for the American Line to Philadelphia on 15/10/1879. She started her last voyage on this service on 19/8/1885 and then went to the Anchor Line, who used her on their London - Halifax - Boston service for four round voyages. In July 1887 she went to the Furness Line who used her on the same run for three round voyages. She was sold to Holland America Line at the end of 1887 and renamed "Amsterdam",and refitted to carry 80-1st, 80-2nd and 800-3rd class passengers. On 31/12/1887 she commenced sailings from Rotterdam to New York. In 1893 she was fitted with triple expansion engines and in 1899 her accommodation was altered to 2nd and 3rd class only. She started her last Amsterdam - New York voyage on 4/2/1905 and was then sold to an Italian company who renamed her "Amsterda". She was later scrapped.[Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 19 October 1997]


ANAPO
See ARAWA.


ANCHORIA
The "Anchoria" was built in 1875 by the Barrow Shipbuilding Co, Barrow for their own company. She was 4,168 gross tons, length 408ft x beam 40.1ft, straight stem, one funnel, three masts, iron construction, single screw and a speed of 13 knots. There was passenger accommodation for 200-1st, 100-2nd and 800-3rd class. Launched on 27/10/1874, she left Glasgow on her maiden voyage to Moville and New York on 2/10/1875. In 1887 she was fitted with triple expansion engines and on 2/11/1893 was purchased by the Anchor Line from the Barrow Shipping Co. On 22/9/1904 she commenced her last Glasgow - Moville - New York (arr 4/10/1904) - Glasgow voyage and on 18/4/1906 was sold to London owners.Resold to the Hamburg America Line, her engines were removed and she was used as a depot ship and crew hostel. She was broken up in either 1925 (Anchor Line) or 1932 (Bonsor) in Germany. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.1, p.460] [Merchant Fleets by Duncan Haws, vol.9, Anchor Line] - [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 6 February 1998]


ANCON
see CONTINENTAL.


ANCONA (1)
The "Ancona" was built in 1907 by Workman, Clark & Co.Ltd., Belfast for the Italian company - Italia. She was a 8,188 gross ton vessel, length 482.3ft x beam 58.3ft, One funnel, two masts, twin screw and a speed of 16 knots. There was accommodation for 60-1st class and 2,500-3rd class passengers. Launched on 19/12/1907, she sailed from Genoa on her maiden voyage to Naples, New York and Philadelphia on 26/3/1908. In 1909 accommodation for 120-1st class passengers was added, and in Sept.1910 she was further modified to carry 60-1st and 120-2nd class. On 7/11/1915 she was torpedoed and sunk by an Austrian submarine south of Sardinia while on passage from Italy to New York, with the loss of 206 lives. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.3,p.1383] [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 27 October 1997]


ANCONA (2)
See BARCELONA (3).


ANCONA (3)
See ANTONINA .


ANDALUCIA
Built for Blue Star Line by Cammel Laird, Birkenhead as the "Andalucia", she was a 12,846 gross ton ship, length 535ft x beam 68.2ft, two funnels, two masts, twin screw and a speed of 16 knots. She was one of five sister ships and had spacious accommodation for 180-1st class passengers only. Designed for the refigerated meat trade between London and the River Plate ports, she also called at Madeira, Rio de Janeiro and Santos. Launched on 21st Sept.1926, she was completed on Mar.1st 1927 and commenced service that year. In May 1929 she was renamed "Andalucia Star" and in 1937 was rebuilt to 14,943 tons and a length of 597 feet and her passenger accommodation reduced to 150-1st class. On Oct.7th 1942, she was torpedoed and sunk by the German submarine U.107, while 400 miles west of Monrovia, with the loss of four lives. All five of these sister ships were torpedoed and sunk during the war, two with heavy loss of life. [Great Passenger Ships of the World by Arnold Kludas, vol.3] - [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 23 August 1998]


ANDALUCIA STAR
See ANDALUCIA.


ANDALUSIA
The "Andalusia" was built in 1896 by Palmers Co Ltd, Jarrow-on-Tyne for the Hamburg America Line. She was a 5,457 gross ton ship, length 397.8ft x beam 50ft, one funnel, two masts, steel construction, single screw and a speed of 13 knots. There was accommodation for 20-1st and 1,200-3rd class passengers. Launched on 1st Sep.1896, she sailed on her maiden voyage from Hamburg to New York on 6th Jan.1897. She started her eighth and last voyage on this service on 4th Dec.1897 and was then transferred to the Far East service. In 1900 she was used as a German troopship during the Boxer Rebellion in China. Seized by US authorities in Manila in April 1917 and operated by the US Shipping Board, she was eventually scrapped in 1925. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P. Bonsor, vol.1, p.403] [Merchant Fleets by Duncan Haws, vol.4, Hamburg America Line] - [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 24 September 1998]

The 1905-06 Lloyd's Register of Shipping has the following listing: Andalusia - Call sign: RKNC Master: Captain G. Schmidt, appointed to the ship in 1904 Rigging: Steel single screw Schooner; 2 decks with 3 tiers of beams; fitted with electric light and refrigerating machinery.Tonnage: 5,441 tons gross, 4,492 under deck and 3,477 net. Dimensions: 399.3 feet long, 50.1 foot beam and 27.3 foot draught. Poop deck and Bridge Deck 244 feet long; Forecastle 44 feet long. Built in 1896 by Palmers Co. Ltd in Newcastle-upon-Tyne. Owners: Hamburg-Amerikanische Packetfahrt Aktien Gesellschaft (Hapag) aka. Hamburg-America Line. Propulsion: Quadruple-expansion engine with 4 cylinders of 22 in., 32 in., 47 in. and 68 in. diameter respectively. Stroke 51 inches. 330 nominal horsepower. Forced draught. Engine built by same company as the hull. Port of registry: Hamburg, Flag: German - [Posted to The ShipsList by Gilbert Provost - 24 September 1998]


ANDANIA
Last owner: Cunard White Star Line; Built: 1922 by Hawthorn Leslie; Gross: 13,950 tons; 520.0 x 65.3 x 39.2; 1,660 nominal horsepower.; 15 knots; turbine engines. The Cunard White Star liner ANDANIA, Capt. D. K. Bain, was taken over by the Admiralty early in the second World War for service as an auxiliary cruiser. On June 16th, 1940 when S.E. of Iceland she was torpedoed by a German submarine. She did not sink immediately and her crew were taken off in safety with only two men injured. (Reference: Dictionary of Disasters at Sea During the Age of Steam, Including Sailing Ships and Ships of War Lost in Action 1824-1962 by Charles Hocking, Vol. I - A to L, Page 31) - North Sea -- Atlantic, June 16, 1940, 0027 hours, German U-boat UA (built for Turkey), Under the command of Hans Cohausz, Position AE 8287, Attacked Armed Merchant Cruiser 14,000 + displacement with torpedo United Kingdom Armed Merchant Cruiser ANDANIA, Actual Tonnage 13950+ , Lat./Long. 62.36 N /15.09 W. (Reference: Axis Submarine Successes 1939-1945 by Jurgen Rohwer, Page 19) - Official # 145934, Steel hull, Twin Screw, 2 decks, Built 1922 by Hawthorn Leslie & Co. Ld., Newcastle, Home port Liverpool, Flag British, Powered by 4 steam turbines (Lloyd's Register of Shipping 1939/40) - [Posted to The ShipsList by Robert Schwemmer - 1 April 1998]


ANDREA DORIA
In the 1905-1906 Lloyds Register of Shipping, the info is as follows: Andrea Doria. Call sign:NCSB Official registration #: 1503 Master: P. Tomei. Rigginig: Wood Brigantine: 2 decks' sheathed in yellow metal in October 1898. Tonnage: 177 tons gross and 168 under deck. Dimensions: 102.4 feet long'25.5 foot beam and holds 13.5 deep. Built: in 1895 by F.Celli in Viareggio. Owners: G.Tomei. Port of registry: Leghorn Flag: Italian. - {E-mail from Sally Farren - 7 October 1998]


ANGEL GABRIEL
The Angel Gabriel was wrecked off the coast of Maine in 1635. I believe it was the first ship that wrecked while bringing immigrants to America from England. The passengers and crew had to swim to shore and barely escaped with their lives.The Angel Gabriel was built by Sir Charles Snell of Kingston, St. Michaels, North Wilts, England, for Sir Walter Raleigh. It was completed around 1617. She was commanded in 1635 by Michael Hunt, who was part owner. The ship was described as "a strong ship, and well furished with forteen or sixteen pieces of ordnance, and therefore our seamen rather desired her company; but she is slow in sailing." The Angel Gabriel set sail on June 4, 1635 from Bristol, England bound for New England. She was accompanied by the lighter ship James. The Angel Gabriel, being heavier, fell behind and anchored in the outer harbor at Pemaquid at the time that the James anchored at the Isles of Shoals. A severe storm came up during the night with extreme tides, and the Angel Gabriel was torn from her anchorage and wrecked on the shore. One seaman and three or four passengers were lost, while two others had died on the voyage. The rest got safely on land, although much of their belongings were lost or damaged.1874. [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Phil Sherrod - 6 October 1997]

ANGEL GABRIEL of Bristol, two hundred and forty tons, ... Taylor, Master. Sailed for New England in June and was wrecked at Pemaquid in August, but no lives were lost. [Wallace: History of Canaan, New Hampshire, 504] [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Christopher Brooks - 7 October 1997]


ANGELO
"Angelo" did indeed belong to the Thomas Wilson Line of Hull. She was built in 1874 for the Hull - Gothenburg - Christiania (Oslo) service by Humphrys and Pearson of Hull and was a 1600 ton vessel, 262ft long x 33.5ft beam, one funnel, three masts rigged for fore and aft sails and a service speed of 12 knots. She must have been a quite impressive ship for her time as she received an extensive review in the Illustrated London News of August 1874. [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Ted Finch - 28 July 1997]

The "Angelo" was built in 1874 by Humphrey and Pearson, Hull. She was a 1,547 gross ton ship, length 258.8ft x beam 33.6ft, one funnel, three masts.Sold for scrapping to White & White in 1906. [The Wilson Line 1831-1981 by A.G.Credland & M.Thompson] [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 2 December 1997]


ANGLIA
The "Anglia" was built by A.Stephen & Sons, Glasgow (engines by Finnieston Steamship Works, Glasgow)in 1869 for the Anchor Line. She was a 2,253 gross ton ship, length 325.3ft x beam 35ft, clipper stem, one funnel, three masts (rigged for sail), iron construction, single screw and a speed of 12 knots. There was capacity for 100-1st class, 80-intermediate and 700-steerage passengers. Launched on 23rd Oct.1869, she sailed from Glasgow on her maiden voyage to Moville (Ireland) and New York on 29th Jan.1870. Her 39th and last voyage on this service started on 5th Aug.1874 and between 1874-76 she made five Glasgow - Mediterranean - New York - Glasgow voyages. Between 1876-78 she completed 12 London - New York round voyages, 1878-79 Glasgow - Liverpool - Bombay (3 Round Voyages), 1879 Glasgow - Mediterranean - New York - Glasgow (2 Round Voyages). In May 1880 she instituted a new London - Halifax - Boston service, but on the 3rd homeward crossing from Boston, she collided with the barque "Trongate" in the Atlantic and sank on 6th Sept.1880 with 200 head of cattle on board. All passengers and crew were taken off safely. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P. Bonsor, vol.1, p.455] - [Merchant Fleets by Duncan Haws, vol.9, Anchor Line] - [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 7 September 1998]


ANGLO-SAXON
The "Anglo-Saxon" was built by Wm Denny & Bros, Dumbarton for the Allan Line of Liverpool in 1856. She was a 1,715 gross ton vessel, length 283ft x beam 35.2ft, clipper stem, one funnel, three masts, iron construction, single screw and a speed of 10 knots. There was accommodation for 75-1st and 350-3rd class passengers. Laid down as the "Saxon", she was actually launched as the "Anglo-Saxon" on 8/4/1856 and commenced her maiden voyage from Liverpool to Quebec and Montreal on 4/6/1856. On 27/4/1863 she was wrecked near Cape Race with the loss of 238 lives. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.1,p.308] [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 5 November 1997]


ANN
The barque 'Ann' left Gravesend in Oct 1847 for Ireland, leaving there in Dec 1847 and arriving in Auckland NZ May 1848. Believe the boat was built in c1812 Bombay for the English Armada but the guns were not installed. In 1847 the boat was hired on H.M.Services to bring the Fencible Soldiers and their families to NZ. Captain Walker was in charge of the boat and he had his family on board as well. The boat left NZ waters two months later in ballast for Hong Kong. She appeared just as mysteriously as she disappeared into the mist. [Posted to The ShipsList by Pam Pakes - 28 November 1997]


ANNA SALEN
The "Anna Salen" was built in 1939 as the "Mormacland" by Sun Shipbuilding & Drydock Co, Chester for Moore-McCormack Lines. She was a 11,672 gross ton ship, length 494ft x beam 69.2ft, single screw and a with a service speed of 17 knots. In 1940 she was taken over before completion by the US Navy and refitted as an auxiliary aircraft carrier. In 1941 she was commissioned by the British Royal Navy as HMS ARCHER and was used for convoy protection duties. She collided with and sank the American SS Brazos on 13th Jan.1942, was badly damaged and towed stern first to Charleston. In 1945 she was taken over by the Ministry of War Transport, renamed "Archer" and refitted as a cargo ship. Managed by the Blue Funnel Line and renamed "Empire Lagan", she was returned to the US Maritime Commission in 1946. Purchased by Sven Salen of Stockholm and registered under the ownership of Rederi A/S Pulp, she was rebuilt as a passenger ship with accommodation for 600 single class passengers. Used as an emigrant ship on various routes, she started a single round voyage between Bremen and Quebec on 2nd July 1953. Sold to Cia Nav.Tasmania, Piraeus in 1955, she was renamed "Tasmania" and placed on the Piraeus - Melbourne service of the Hellenic Mediterranean Line. In 1958 she was rebuilt to 7,638 gross tons and in 1961 was sold to China Union Lines, Taipeh and renamed "Union Reliance". On 7th Nov.1961 she collided with the Norwegian tanker "Beran" in the Houston Ship Channel and was beached on fire. Towed to Galveston on 11th Nov, she was sold in Jan.1962 to be scrapped at New Orleans. [Great Passenger Ships of the World by Arnold Kludas, vol.4,p.219] [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P. Bonsor, vol.5, p.1816] There is a photo of this ship in Great Passenger Ships of the World by A.Kludas, vol.4. ISBN 0-85059-253-4 - [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 19 August 1998]


ANNA STROWIG
See GOTHIA.


ANSGAR
See ELBE (1) .


ANTIGONE
See NECKAR (2) .


ANTONINA
The "Antonina" was built by Blohm & Voss, Hamburg in 1898 for the Hamburg South America Line. Her details were - 4,010 gross tons, length 361.1ft x beam 44.8ft, one funnel, two masts, single screw and a speed of 12 knots. There was passenger accommodation for 28-1st and 704-3rd class. Launched on 18/6/1898, she sailed from Hamburg on her maiden voyage to Brazil on 25/8/1898. In 1901 she was chartered to Italia Line and sailed between Genoa and the River Plate ports. Purchased by the Hamburg America Line in 1904, she commenced sailing between Hamburg and Para in 1905. On 30/4/1912 she started her first Hamburg - New York voyage and made three North Atlantic crossings, the last starting on 18/4/1914 when she left Hamburg for Boston. In 1914 she was interned at Tampico, Mexico for the duration of the Great War, and in 1920 was towed to Hamburg in a damaged condition. Repaired and surrendered to Britain in 1921, she was sold to German owners in 1922 and renamed "Haimon". In 1927 she was again renamed "Ancona" and in 1928 went to Brazilian owners, who renamed her "Pirangy". She was finally scrapped in 1960. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.1, p.414] [South Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, p.208] - [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 5 March 1998]


ANTONIO LOPEZ
The "Antonio Lopez" was a 5975 gross ton vessel built by Wm Denny & Bros, Dumbarton, Scotland in 1891 as the "Ruahine" for the New Zealand Shipping Company. Her dimensions were length 430ft x beam 50.1ft, one funnel, two masts, single screw and a speed of 14 knots. There was accommodation for 58-1st, 38-2nd, and 1,000-3rd class passengers. Launched on 20/10/1891, she was used on the UK - Australia - New Zealand run until 1899 when she was sold to the Spanish company Compania Trasatlantica Espanola, who renamed her "Antonio Lopez". On 21/10/1904 she left Genoa on her first voyage to Naples, Barcelona, Cadiz, New York, Havana and Vera Cruz. She stayed on the North Atlantic service until 4/1/1931 when she sailed from New York on her last voyage to Cadiz and Barcelona. In 1936 she was laid up in Cadiz until 1946 when she was scrapped. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.3, p.1256][Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Ted Finch - 12 September & 15 October 1997]


APOLLO
The brig Apollo, built by Heinrich Bosse in Berg, near Bremen, on the Weser River. It was 86 feet in length, 21 feet wide, and was launched on March 31, 1835. The owner was Friedrich Leo Quentell of Bremen, and he was also the owner of the brig Ferdinand. The Apollo made two trips from Bremen to Galveston with passengers that were being transported by the Society for the Protection of German Immigrants to Texas. [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Gary Martens - 2 August 1997]


ARABIA
See BARCELONA (3).


ARABIC (1) (of 1881)
See SPAARNDAM .


ARABIC (2)
See BERLIN (2),


ARAWA (1)
ARAWA was built for Shaw, Saville & Albion by Wm.Denny of Dumbarton in 1884. She was a 5026 gross ton vessel, with clipper stem, two funnels and four masts,length 439.6ft x beam 46.3ft, single screw and a speed of 13 knots. To reduce fuel consumption on the UK - Australia run, she was rigged for sails, being square rigged on the fore and mainmasts and fore & aft rigged on the other two. As originally built, she carried 95-1st class, 52-2nd class and 200 emigrants. She could also accommodate a further 470 emigrants in a cargo tween deck with portable bulkheads. She commenced service London - Australia - New Zealand in 1884 and stayed in this service until 1893 when she was chartered to James Huddart and was put onto the Australia - Vancouver run. In July 1895, she was taken over by the Union SS Co. of New Zealand and ran for one voyage between Australia and San Francisco. Late in 1895, she was chartered to the Spanish government who renamed her "Colon" and used her as a transport in the Spanish - American war. Returned to her owners she was renamed "Arawa" again and was put up for sale and purchased by Elder Dempster & Co. but immediately taken over by the British government and used as a transport in the Boer War. Returned to her owners in 1900, she was put onto the Beaver Line service from Liverpool to Halifax and St John NB [commencing 10/3/1900] and renamed "Lake Megantic". She underwent considerable change under Beaver Line ownership and was rebuilt with new boilers, mainmast and all yards and sailing rigging removed, new funnels and accommodation provided for 120-1st, 180-2nd and 700-3rd class passengers. On 4/2/1903 she left Liverpool on her last voyage to St John NB. In 1904 there was a plan to use her as an exhibition ship, but this fell through and in 1905 she was transferred to Elder Dempster's Imperial Direct West India Mail Line and renamed "Port Henderson". In 1912 she was sold to Italy and renamed "Arrapo" and in 1913 resold to other Italian buyers and renamed "Porto Said". In Dec.1915 she was torpedoed and sunk by a German submarine off Cyrenaica. [J.H.Isherwood - Sea Breezes, May 1950] [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Ted Finch]


ARAWA (2)
The "Arawa" was built by Swan Hunter & Wigham Richardson, Wallsend-on-Tyne in 1907 for Shaw Savill & Albion Co Ltd and was constructed specially for the frozen meat trade and with passenger accommodation for 220 in three classes. She was a 9,372 gross ton ship, length 460ft x beam 60ft, twin screw with a speed of 14 knots. She sailed on her maiden voyage from London to Cape Town and Wellington on 22nd August 1907. In 1909 she lost her starboard propellor after leaving Cape Town and proceeded to Wellington at reduced speed on the remaining screw. Between 1914-15 she was used as a troopship, and resumed service on 3/5/1921 sailing from London via Panama to Wellington. In 1926 she was converted to a cabin class ship and commenced her last voyage from Southampton on 25/5/1928. She was then sold to Arnold Bernstein of Germany and renamed "Konigstein". In 1939 she was sold to Cie Maritime Belge and renamed "Gandia" and on 22/1/1942 was torpedoed and sunk in mid Atlantic, NW of the Azores by the German submarine U.135. The Shaw Savill meat ships sailed from the Royal group of docks in London. They comprised the Victoria, Albert and King George V docks. - [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 12 March 1998}


ARCADIA
The "Arcadia" was the first of two ships with this name owned by Hamburg America Line. She was built by Harland & Wolff, Belfast in 1896 and her details were - 5,442 gross tons, length 400ft x beam 49ft, one funnel, two masts, single screw and a speed of 13 knots. There was accommodation for 20-1st and 1,100-3rd class passengers. launched on 8/10/1896, she left Hamburg on her maiden voyage to Montreal in April 1897. On 16/5/1897 she stranded near Cape Ray, Newfoundland on the homeward voyage, but was refloated and returned to Quebec for temporary repairs and then proceeded to Belfast for reconditioning by her builders. On 3/11/1897 she sailed from Belfast to New York and Hamburg and on 15/12/1897 commenced her first voyage Hamburg - Portland - Boston. On 25/7/1914 she left Hamburg on her last voyage to Baltimore and took refuge in the USA due to the outbreak of the Great War. In April 1917 she was seized at Newport News by US authorities and became the US government ship "Arcadia". She was scrapped in 1926. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.1,p.402] [Posted to the ShipsList by Ted Finch - 5 November 1997]

The steamship ARCADIA was built for the Hamburg-America Line by Harland & Wolff, Belfast, and launched on 8 October 1896. 5,442 tons; 121,4 x 14,9 meters (length x beam); straight bow, 1 funnel, 2 masts; steel construction, screw propulsion, service speed 12 knots; accommodation for 20 passengers in 1st class, and 1,136 in steerage. April 1897, maiden voyage, Hamburg-Montreal. 16 May 1897, stranded near Cape Ray, Newfoundland, on homeward voyage; 30 May 1897, arrived Quebec for temporary repairs; proceeded to builders for recoditioning. 3 November 1897, first voyage, Belfast-New York-Hamburg. 15 December 1897, first voyage, Hamburg-Portland-Boston, 4 September 1900, troop transport to China (Boxer Rebellion). 20 June 1908, 3 men killed when a box containg detonators exploded in storeroom IV. 29 December 1913, rescued the crew of the British steamship TEMPLEMORE, on fire in the North Atlantic. 25 July 1914, last voyage, Hamburg-Baltimore. 18 August 1914, laid up in Newport News. 6 April 1917, seized by the U.S. Shipping Board. 1920, chartered to the Acme Operation Co., Seattle. 1922, chartered to the California Steam Ship Co., Panama. 1926, scrapped [Arnold Kludas and Herbert Bischoff, Die Schiffe der Hamburg- Amerika-Linie, Bd. 1: 1847-1906 (Herford: Koehler, 1979), p. 66 (photograph); Noel Reginald Pixell Bonsor, North Atlantic Seaway; An Illustrated History of the Passenger Services Linking the Old World with the New (2nd ed.; Jersey, Channel Islands: Brookside Publications), vol. 1 (1975), p. 403]. - [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 10 February 1998]


ARCADIAN
See ORTONA.


ARCHER
See ANNA SALEN.


ARCHIBALD McMILLAN
The ship ARCHIBALD McMILLAN, built in Dumbarton in 1854, under special survey conducted by Lloyds Register of Shipping. 498 tons; 147.3 x 24.9 x 16.3 feet (length x beam x depth of hold). Master: 1854/55-1856/57 - Galloway; 1857/58-1862/63 - M. Lyle; 1861/62-1864/65 - W. Wilson; 1864/65-1865/66 - D. McMillan; 1865/66-1866/67 - M'Arthur. Owner: J. Kerr. Port of Registry: Greenock. Port of Survey: Clydeside. Destined Voyage: 1854/55-1855/56 - West Indies; 1856/57 - Mauritius; 1857/58-1860/61 - West Indies; 1861/62-1862/63 - Ceylon [crossed out]/West Indies; 1863/64-1866/67 - West Indies. A notation in Lloyd's Register for 1866/67 indicates that the ARCHIBALD McMILLAN was wrecked, most probably between 1 July 1866 and 30 June 1867. - [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 9 August 1998]


ARCHIMEDE
The ARCHIMEDE, built by A Stephen & Sons, Glasgow; laid down for the Florio Line, but launched on 22 November 1881 for the successor firm of Navigazione Generale Italiana (NGI). 2,839 tons; 106,70 x 12,19 meters (350.1 x 40 feet; length x beam); clipper bow, 1 funnel, 3 masts; iron construction, screw propulsion, service speed 12 knots; accommodation for 20 1st-, 56 2nd-,and 550 3rd-class passengers. 7 February 1882, maiden voyage, Catania-Palermo-New York. 18 June 1887, last coyage, Palermo-Naples-New York. 7 February 1888, first voyage, Naples-Cadiz-Montevideo-Buenos Aires. 3 March 1899, first voyage, Genoa-Naples-New York. 14 March 1903, last voyage, Genoa-Naples-New York (40 roundtrip voyages). 1903, transferred to the Italy-Alexandria service and renamed CAIRO. 5 March 1905, wrecked near Alexandria [Noel Reginald Pixell Bonsor, North Atlantic Seaway; An Illustrated History of the Passenger Services Linking the Old World with the New (2nd ed.; Jersey, Channel Islands: Brookside Publications), vol. 3 (1979), p. 1111; Bonsor, South Atlantic Seaway; An illustrated history of the passenger lines and liners from Europe to Brazil, Uruguay and Argentina (Jersey, Channel Islands: Brookside Publications, 1983), p. 301].[Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 24 September 1997]


ARCONIA
See IOANNINA .


ARCTIC
The "Arctic" was built in 1850 by Wm H. Brown, New York (engines by Novelty Iron Works, New York) for the Collins Line of New York. She was a 2,856 gross ton ship, length 285ft x beam 45.9ft, one funnel, three masts, wooden construction, paddle wheel propulsion and a speed of 12 knots. There was accommodation for 200-1st class passengers. Launched on 28/1/1850, she left New York on her maiden voyage to Liverpool on 27/10/1850. In 1851, accommodation for 80-2nd class passengers was added and she made a record passage in 1852 (7/2-17/2) from New York to Liverpool. In 1853, her mizzen (third) mast was removed and on 27/9/1854 she was sunk in collision with the French steamship "Vesta" near Cape Race with the loss of between 285 and 351 lives. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.1,p.207] [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 22 November 1997]


ARDEAL
See EMIL KIRDORFF.


ARGENTINA (1)
see BRASILE (2)


ARGENTINA (2)
The S.S. Argentina (U.S. Flag) was built in 1929 as the S.S. Pennsylvania. And was renamed in 1938 to S.S. Argentina. Builders: Newport News Shipbuilding and Drydock Co. NewportNews, Va. Launched: July 10,1929. Yard No. 329. GRT 20,526 . Length 613 feet. Breadth: 80.4 feet. Turbine=Electric Drive. Twin Screw Speed 17.0 to 18.5 knots. Passengers 385 1st class, Tourist Class 365. Crew 350. Service: U.S.East Coast to U.S. West Coast vis Panama Canal. Operators :Panama Pacific Lines. 1937 Sold to U.S. Maritime Commission Rebuilt for U.S. East Coast to East Coast of South America. Rebuilt to carry 500 passengers and one of the two stacks removed. 1938 Renamed S.S. Argentina Placed in service New York to Buenos Aires Company then changed to American Republic Line, Operated by Moore & McCormack Lines 1942 Taken over by War Shipping Adminstration as a Troop Ship. 1947 Resumed the New York to Buenos Aires trade. 1963 Sold to Peck Iron & Metals, Norfolk , Va. for Scrap. 1964 Resold to Luria Bros in South Kearny, N.J. aaand scrapped. NOTE: There were three vessels of this class: While operating as the Panama Pacific Lines their names were. S.S. Pennsylvania S.S. Virginia S.S. California. American Republica Lines renamed them. S.S. Argentina S.S. Brazil S.S. Uruguay. All three ships were considered Sister Ships All three ships were troopships during the Second World War. And all three of the ships survived the war. I made one voyage on the S.S. Brazil in 1942. These ships were replaced by newer vessels in the early 1960`s. [Posted to The ShipsList by Captain C.J.Carroll - 18 May 1998]


ARGENTINA (3) See JERUSALEM.


ARGO (1)
The only transatlantic "Argo" I can find in my records, and belonging to the European & American Steam Shipping Co. was wrecked at Trepassey Bay, Newfoundland while on passage New York - Galway, Ireland on 28.6.1859.
There was however an "Argo" owned by the Wilson Line which ran between the Baltic Sea ports and Hull, from where your ancestor could have travelled by train across to Liverpool to board a transatlantic liner.
There was also an American "Arago" which sailed between New York and Bremen in 1868-9.[Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Ted Finch - 13 August 1997]


ARGO (2)
See ARGONAUT.


ARGONAUT
J.Carmichael & Co had an "Argonaut" built by Barclay Curle, Glasgow in 1876 which sailed between London and Sydney at this time. She was a three masted, full rigged ship and was used in the wool trade, 1488 tons, length 254.4ft x beam 38.6ft x depth 23.2ft and iron construction. Her best run from Sydney to London was in 77 days in 1895. I haven't much info on this ship, but she later became the Portuguese "Elvira" and was used on the Lisbon - Rio de Janeiro - New Orleans - Lisbon service. In 1913 she was renamed "Argo", but I have nothing on her after 1914. - [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 1 June 1998]


ARIOSTO
The "Ariosto" was a North Sea and Baltic trader belonging to the Wilson Line of Hull, built by Earle's of Hull in 1890. She was 2,376 gross tons, length 300.4ft x beam 38ft. She was sold on 28.6.1910 to La Roda Hermanos, Valencia and renamed "Luis Vives" and was torpedoed and sank off the Scilly Isles while on passage from Valencia to Liverpool on 11.9.1916. [The Wilson Line of Hull, 1831-1981 by A.G.Credland & M.Thompson] [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 2 December 1997]

The "Ariosto" was a North Sea passenger ship which sailed between Scandinavian and Baltic ports and the UK for Wilson Line of Hull. Your grandmother would have disembarked at Hull and taken a direct train to Liverpool (or possibly Glasgow) where she boarded a transatlantic liner. There are details of the ship and route at - The Solum & Swiggum Norwegian Emigration site. - [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 26 October 1998]


ARISTIDES
See TROY.


ARIZONA
See CITY OF CHESTER.


ARKADIA
See MONARCH OF BERMUDA.


ARMADALE CASTLE
The "Armadale Castle" was built in 1903 and was a 13,973 gross ton mail steamer. Sister ship to the "Kenilworth Castle" she was withdrawn from service in 1935 and broken up shortly afterwards. This is all the info I have on this ship at the moment. 1868-9.[Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 10 November 1997]

I can add the following few details from Arnold Kludas, Die grossen Passagierschiffe der Welt; Eine Dokumentation, Band 1: 1858-1912 (2nd ed.; Oldenburg/Hamburg: Gerhard Stalling, c1972), p. 38: built by Fairfield, Glasgow (ship #424); 179,9 x 19,6 meters (length x beam); accommodation for 350 1st-, 200 2nd-, and 270 3rd-class passengers; crew of 260. She was launched on 11 August 1903, and began her maiden voyage from Southampton to Cape Town on 5 December 1903. In August 1914, she became an auxiliary cruiser in the 10th Cruiser Squadron; later in the War she served as a troop transport. In 1918, she was returned to passenger service between the UK and South Africa. She was laid up in 1935, and broken up the following year. {Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 13 November 1997]


ARMONIA
See WEIMAR.


ARNEDYKE
See INDIA VICTORY.


ARNO
See FRISIA.


AROSA KULM
Arosa Line. Built at Hog Island, Pa., U.S.A. In service 1952 - 8950 tons, 436x58 feet 1funnel 2masts GT engines, 14knots. formerly SS American Banker, United States Line. 46 tourist pass in cabin, 919 in dormitory. before 1953 painted white with green band; after 1953 painted black with red waterline & white band. Ref; Gibbs, Passenger Liners of the Western Ocean. [Posted to The ShipsList by Paul Petersen - 19 November 1997]

The "Arosa Kulm" was built in 1919 by the American International Shipbuilding Corporation, Hog Island, Penn. She was a 7,430 gross ton ship, length overall 448ft x beam 58.2ft, one funnel, two masts, single screw and a speed of 17 knots. Originally launched on 27/10/1919 as the US Army Transport "Cantigny", she went to the American Merchant Line in 1924 and was renamed "American Banker" with accommodation for 12 tourist class passengers. On 24/4/1924 she commenced her first voyage from New York to London and in 1926 her accommodation was altered to carry 80 tourist passengers. In 1931 she went to the United States Line and on 6/11/1931 started her first sailing from New York to Plymouth and London. On 8/10/1939 she commenced her last round voyage New York - London(dep 25/10) - New York(arr 4/11) . In 1940 she went to the French company, Societe Maritime Anversoise who renamed her "Ville d'Anvers" and on 9/3/1940 she started her first voyage from New York to Liverpool. In 1945 she went back to the United States Line and in 1946 went to the Isbrandsten Line. Later the same year she was sold to the Compania de Vapores Mediterranea, Honduras, her accommodation altered to carry 200 single class passengers and renamed "City of Athens" but was chartered to the Stevenson Line of Honduras and sailed from New York to Istanbul on 11/11/1946. She made two more voyages on this service on 23/1/1947 and 3/4/1947 and on 30/5/1947 commenced her 4th voyage for this company when she sailed from New York for Genoa, Piaeus, and Baltimore(arr 12/7). On 12/8/1947 she was sold by auction at Baltimore and was bought by the Panamian Lines, renamed "Proteus" and rebuilt from Oct'47-Apr'48 at Genoa. She then became a 8,929 ton ship with accommodation for 965 single class passengers, and from May 1948-July 1951 she ran for the Panamanian Lines and later Compania de Operaziones Maritima, Italy. During this period she made 4 round voyages to Australia, one voyage Italy - Brazil, one Italy - Central America, 5 from Italy - South America, 2 Gdynia - Haifa, and 3 Italy - Australia. In August 1951 she went to Compania Internacional Tr ansportadora (Arosa Line) of Panama and made one round voyage from Marseilles to Indochina and Italy before being chartered to the Incres Line of Panama. She commenced her first voyage for this company from Havre to Plymouth and St John NB on 10/12/1951 and started her last run on 10/12/1951 from Havre to Plymouth, St John NB and Bremen(arr 4/1/1952). She then went back to the Arosa Line and was renamed "Arosa Kulm". On 18/3/1952 she commenced her first voyage from Bremen to Zeebrugge, Southampton and Halifax and in April 1952 made her first sailing from Bremen to Quebec and Montreal. Her final voyage commenced on 5/9/1958 when she sailed from New York for Bremen and on 6/12/1958 she was arrested for debt at Plymouth. She arrived at Bruges on 7/5/1959 and was scrapped. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.4,p.1549] There is a picture of this vessel in North Atlantic Seaway, vol.4,p.1713. [Posted to the ShipsList by Ted Finch - 20 November 1997]


AROSA SUN
The "Arosa Sun" was built by Ateliers & Chantiers de la Loire, St Nazaire, France as the "Felix Roussel" for the French company, Messageries Maritimes. Her details when built were - 16,774 gross tons, length 545ft, beam 68.3ft, two square funnels, two masts, twin screw and a speed of 15 knots. She had accommodation for 196-1st, 110-2nd and 89-3rd class passengers. She was launched on 17/12/1929 and left Marseilles on her maiden voyage to the Suez Canal, Singapore, Saigon, Shanghai and Yokohama on 26/2/1931. In 1935, she was lengthened and her tonnage increased to 17,080 tons. She remained on the Far East service until 1940 when she came under the Free French flag and was used as a troop transport, managed by the Bibby Line. In 1942 she sustained some damage when attacked at Singapore by Japanese aircraft and on 15/4/1946 was returned to Messageries Maritimes at Durban. From June 1948 to Sept.1950, she was refitted at Dunkirk and her two square funnels were reduced to one oval one. On 22/2/1955 she commenced her last voyage to the Far East and was then sold to the Arosa Line of Panama who renamed her "Arosa Sun". She was rebuilt to become 20,126 gross tons, length overall 597ft, beam 68.3ft, one funnel, two masts, twin screw and a speed of 18 knots. There was accommodation for 60-1st and 862-tourist class passengers. On 14/7/1955 she commenced her first voyage from Trieste to Palermo, Naples, Lisbon and New York(arr. 1/8/1955), Quebec, Havre, Southampton and Bremen. On 20/8/1955 she started her first voyage from Bremen - Southampton - Havre - Quebec. On 15/3/1958 she sustained an engine explosion off the Columbian coast with the loss of 2 lives, was towed to Cristobal, then repaired at Baltimore and on 12/5/1958 resumed service New York - Bremen. On 13/9/1958 she commenced her last voyage Bremen - Quebec - Montreal - Quebec - Plymouth - Havre - Bremen and in December of that year was arrested for debt at Bremen. In 1960 she became a floating hostel for steel workers at Ymuiden, Holland and on 22/3/1974 left in tow for Bilbao, where she was scrapped. [North Atlantic Seaway, by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.4,p.1716] [Sea Breezes Magazine, June 1955] [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 30 October 1997]


ARRAPO
See ARAWA.


ARUNDEL CASTLE (1)
:ARUNDEL CASTLE (1894) - (a) Castle Line (b) Union-Castle Line. Built by Fairfield Shipbuilding & Engineering Co., Glasgow, Scotland. Tonnage 4,588. Dimensions 416' x 45'. Single-screw, 13 1/2 knots. Triple Expansion engines. Four masts and one funnel. Intermediate type of Steamer. Vessel sold to Danish East Asiatic Company in 1905. Renamed: (a) BIRMA (1905), (b) MITAU (1913), (c) JOSZEF PILSUDSKI (1920), (d) WILBO (1922). Scrapped in 1924. [ Passenger Ships of the World Past and Present by Eugene W. Smith,, George H. Dean Co., Boston, 1978, page 523] [E-mail from Lou Alfano to Sue Seales - 4 December 1997]


ARUNDEL CASTLE (2)
Arundel Castle ; this ship was a 4 stacker ( funnels ) there were only 14 such ships built. Union Castle built the ARUNDEL CASTLE ; She is in the class of ( Norddeutscher Lloyd ) KAISER WILHELM DER GROSSE, KRONPRINZ WILHELM, KAISER WILHELM 2ND, AND KRONPRINZESSIN CECILIE. Hapag only built one 4 stacker the DEUTSCHLSAND ., as did the Compagnie General Transatlique with the ship FRANCE. The Cunard and White Star Lines each constructed 3, and these are probably the most famous liners of all time : LUSITANIA, MAURETANIA, AQUITANIA, OLYMPIC, AND TITANIC, BRITANNIC. And finally, the Union Castle builders built the WINDSOR CASTLE. THE INITIAL NAME chosen for ARUNDEL CASTLE was Amroth Castle. but Arundel Castle name won out. Harland and Wolff began work on Arundel Castle on 11-6-1915. It was completed and launched Sept. 11th, 1919. [ 6 years after first being concieved] [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by M.L. Durse - 8 August 1997]

"Arundel Castle", built by Harland & Wolff at Belfast for Union Castle Mail Steamship Co. and launched in 1919. Her dimensions were length 661ft x beam 72.7ft, 18,980 gross tons, four funnels, two masts, twin screw and a speed of 17 knots. She originally had accommodation for 234-1st, 362-2nd class, 274-3rd class and 300 steerage passengers. She also carried a crew of 440. She commenced her maiden voyage from Southampton to Capetown on 22nd April 1921. She continued on the UK - S.Africa mail service until 1937 when she was refitted and modernised by Harland & Wolff and rebuilt with only two funnels. Her speed was increased to 20 knots and her accommodation altered to carry 219-1st, 167-2nd and 194 tourist class passengers. In 1939 she was requisitioned and used as a troop transport until 1949 when she was again overhauled and refitted to carry 164-1st and 371 tourist class passengers and continued on the Capetown service. In December 1958 she left Southampton to be broken up at Kowloon. There are two very good photos of this ship in Vol.2. of Great Passenger Ships of the World by Arnold Kludas (ISBN 0-85059-242-9). [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Ted Finch - 8 August 1997]

ARUNDEL CASTLE (1921) - Union-Castle Line. Built by Harland and Wolff, Ltd., Belfast, Ireland. Tonnage 19,023. Dimensions 630' x 75'. Twin-screw, 18 knots. Steam turbines. Two masts and four funnels. Service: Southampton - Capetown. Passengers 760. Crew 440. Lengthened to 661 feet (19.118 tons) in 1938, and also altered by replacing her original funnels with two of the new streamlined type. Scrapped in Hong Kong 1959. Sister ship: WINDSOR CASTLE. 1924. [ Passenger Ships of the World Past and Present by Eugene W. Smith,, George H. Dean Co., Boston, 1978, page 523] [E-mail from Lou Alfano to Sue Seales - 4 December 1997]


ASAHI MARU
See DANTE ALIGHIERI.


ASCENDANT
The Ascendant appears in Lloyds Register for 1850-1869. She is classed as a bark in the volumes for 1850-1860, but as a square-rigged ship in the volumes for 1861-1869. 500/562 tons (old/new measurement), 124 x 29.5 x 19.5 feet (length, breadth, depth), built in Sunderland in 1849 by Halls. She was owned by Temperley, and registered in London. She ran primarily to Australia, although in Lloyds Register for 1860 her destination is given as India, and in the volumes for 1861 and 1862 it is given as China. She does not appear in Lloyds Register for 1870 or subsequent years, but there is no indication of her fate. Twenty years was the average lifespan of a sailing vessel in the Australian/Asian trade in the 19th century, and if she was not wrecked she was probably broken up, or "sold foreign", possibly in Australia. The master of the Ascendant from 1850 to 1860 was R. Spencer. I know nothing about him but his name, but you should be able to learn more about him from Lloyd's Captains Registers, 1851-1947, the originals of which are now deposited (Mss. 18,567-71) in the Guildhall Library, in London. These registers have been microfilmed, and copies of these microfilms are held by the Australian National Maritime Museum in Sydney. [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 3 July 1997]


ASCTUNEY
See PISA.


ASHLAND
The ship ASHLAND, William Williams, master, bound from Liverpool to New York with a cargo of iron, coal, and salt, and 160 steerage passengers, went ashore "at South Hampton, opposite Meacock's Bay, Long Island", on the night of 29/30 April 1847 [New York Evening Post for 1 and 5 May 1847]; the ship was later refloated, and brought to New York [Evening Post, 28 May 1847]. For further details on this event, see the maritime news column of the New York Herald. The ASHLAND was a 3-masted, square-rigged ship, 631 tons, built in Swansea, Massachusetts, in 1846, and registered at New York on 10 November 1846 [Forrest Holdcamper, List of American-flag Merchant Vessels that received Certificats of Enrollment or Registry at the Port of New York, 1789-1867 (Record Groups 41 and 36), National Archives Publication No. 68-10, Special Lists No. 22 (Washington, DC: National Archives and Records Administration, 1968), p. 60]. I know very little of the history of the ASHLAND, as she does not appear in William Armstrong Fairburn, Merchant Sail (Center Lovell, ME: Fairburn Marine Educational Foundation, [1945-55]). However, I have been able to abstract the following references from my database of New York ship arrivals for 1820-1850, Carl C. Cutler,Queens of the Western Ocean; The Story of America's Mail and Passenger Sailing Lines (Annapolis: United States Naval Institute, c1961), and from Ira A. Glazier and P. William Filby, Germans to America; Lists of Passengers Arriving at U.S. Ports (Wilmington, Delaware: Scholarly Resources, 1988ff), vols. 1-9, covering 1850-1855: 1846 - Aaron Hawley, master, in Dunham & Dimon's Liverpool Line of New York-Liverpool packets [Cutler, p. 383]. - Aaron Hawley, master, in the Schooner Line of New York-Savannah packets [Cutler, p. 476].1847 - William Williams, master, from Liverpool to New York, went ashore on Long Island, April 1847 [see above]. - A. Hubbard, master, from Liverpool to New York; passenger manifest dated 20 December 1847 [National Archives Microfilm Publication M237, roll 70, list #993 for 1847] - John D. Rice, master, in the Holmes Line of New York-New Orleans packets [Cutler, p. 502]. 1848 - John D. Rice, master, from Liverpool to New York; passenger manifest dated 21 July 1848 [National Archives Microfilm Publication M237, roll 74, list #787 for 1848]. - John D. Rice, master, in the Union Line of New York-New Orleans packets [Cutler, p. 512]. 1849 - John D. Rice, master, from Liverpool to New York; passenger manifest dated 5 June 1849 [National Archives Microfilm Publication M237, roll 80, list #656 for 1849]. - Edward G. [? recte John D.] Rice, master, in the Black Star Line of New York-Liverpool packets [Cutler, p. 385]. - John D. Rice, master, in the Eagle Line of New York-New Orleans packets [Cutler, p. 518]. 1850 - John D. Rice, master, from Cork to New York; passenger manifest dated 20 April 1850 [National Archives Microfilm Publication M237, roll 87, list #229 for 1850]. - John D. Rice, master, from Dublin and Liverpool to New York; passenger manifest dated 25 September 1850 [National Archives Microfilm Publication M237, roll 92, list #1102 for 1850]. 1853 - Robert B. Benson, master, from Antwerp to New York; passenger manifest dated 5 May 1853 [Germans to America_, vol. 4, pp. 419-420].- Robert B. Benson, master, in the Union Line of New York-New Orleans packets [Cutler, p. 517]. 1855 - Fletcher, master, in the Brigham Line of New York-New Orleans packets; still in the line in 1856, Edward Moore, master [Cutler, p. 524]. - Edward Moore, master, from Havre to New Orleans; passenger manifest dated 30 March 1855 [Germans to America, vol. 9, pp.189-190]. 1856 - Edward Moore, master, in the Brigham Line of New York-New Orleans packets [Cutler, p. 524]. From these references it is evident that the ASHLAND was a regular participant in the "cotton triangle trade", carrying passengers from Europe (at first from Liverpool, later from Continental ports) to either New York or (later) New Orleans, then proceeding to a Southern port to take on a cargo of cotton, to be delivered to a European port. [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 15 November 1997]


ASIA
The "Asia" was built by Russell & Co, Port Glasgow (engines by J.G.Kincaid & Co, Greenock) in 1907 as the "Alice" for the Austrian company, Unione Austriaca. She was a 6,122 gross ton ship, length 415.3ft x beam 49.6ft, one funnel, two masts, twin screw and a speed of 16 knots. She was built with passenger accommodation for 50-1st, 75-2nd and 1,500-3rd class. Launched on 29/5/1907, she commenced her maiden voyage on 28/8/1907 when she sailed from Trieste for Patras, Palermo and New York. She started her last crossing from Trieste to Palermo, Algiers and New York on 10/8/1913 and subsequently sailed to South America. On the outbreak of the Great War, she was interned in Brazil, was seized by the Brazilian authorities in 1917 and renamed "Asia". Ceded to France as war reparations in December 1919, she was sold to the Fabre Line and rebuilt with accommodation for 130-cabin and 1,350-3rd class passengers. She commenced her first voyage for these owners on 19/9/1920 from Marseilles to Lisbon, Providence and New York. She continued Mediterranean - US voyages until making her last sailing in October 1929 when she left Marseilles for Providence, New York (arr.12/11, dep.20/11), Providence and Marseilles. She was then used on various services until 21/5/1930 when she was destroyed by fire in the Red Sea while carrying pilgrims to Mecca. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P. Bonsor, vol.3, p.1136/1331] - [Posted to The Shp\ipsList by Ted Finch - 20 june 1998]


ASIATIC (of 1881)
See SPAARNDAM .


ASIATIC PRINCE (of 1896 & 1898)
See PRINCE LINE FREIGHTERS


ASPENLEAF
See LAKE ERIE.


ASSINIBOIA
The ASSINIBOIA is listed in the 1908-09 Lloyd's Register of Shipping . I also found her "sister ship", the KEEWATIN. Both ships are almost identical except for minor differences listed below. I also found them mentionned in a book called Great Lakes' Saga by Anna G. Young in 1965. On page 105, there is the following text, and I quote: "In 1908 the ASSINIBOIA and KEEWATIN joined the fleet. They were built at Govan, Scotland and were top-notchers of their day. For fifty eight years they have carried thousands of passengers between Owen Sound and Fort William, the passing panorama of land and water had brought relaxation and enjoyment that leave nostalgic memories. Their freight carrying figures would make impressive reading. Now, in November 1965, these flagships of the Great Lakes fleet of the Canadian Pacific Railway must go. They have been overtaken by time. Their wooden frames and fittings are considered fire hazards. The trade is not sufficient to justify the costs of rebuilding. The safety, convenience, and economy of progress are paid for with treasures of the past. The ASSINIBOIA will continue in freight service. The fate of the KEEWATIN remains uncertain. They are the last of a splendid breed."
ASSINIBOIA - Official registration #: 125984 (consecutive number with the KEEWATIN) Master: Captain E.B. Anderson, appointed to the shipping line in 1883 and to the ship in 1907. Rigging: steel 3 masts single screw steam Schooner; 1 steel deck with deep framing and steel awning deck sheathed in wood; 5 cemented bulkheads; flat keel; fitted with electric light and machinery aft. Tonnage: 3,880 tons gross, 2,613 under deck and 2,486 net.Dimensions: 336.5 feet long, 43.8 foot beam and 15.4 feet deep; Bridge and Forecastle 295 feet long; water ballast in cellular double bottom under engine and boilers 113 feet long, forward 185 feet long and 720 tons; Forward Peak Tank 24 tons. Built: in 1907 by Fairfield Co. Ltd. in Glasgow.Propulsion: quadruple expansion engine with 4 cylinders of 23 1/2, 34, 48 1/2 & 70 inches diameter respectively; stroke 45 inches; operating at 220 p.s.i.; 524 nominal horsepower; 4 single ended boilers, 12 corrugated furnaces; grate surface 299 sq. ft.; heating surface 9,627 sq. ft.; engine built by same company as the hull. Owners: Canadian Pacific Railway Co. Port of registry: Montreal. Flag: British - [Posted to TheShipsList by Gilbert Provost - 23 October 1998]


ASSYRIA (1)
The Anchor Line's "Assyria" was built by Robert Duncan & Co, Port Glasgow (engines by Finnieston Steamship Works, Glasgow) in 1871. She was a 1,630 gross ton ship, length 300.5ft x beam 33.2ft, straight stem, one funnel, three masts (rigged for sail), iron construction, single screw and a speed of 10 knots. There was capacity for 100-1st and 500-3rd class passengers. Launched on 9th Jan.1871, her maiden voyage started 8th Feb.1871 when she left Glasgow for New York. In Nov.1871 she commenced her first Glasgow - Mediterranean - New York - Glasgow voyage and on 4th Jun.1873 started her tenth and last Glasgow - New York direct sailing. On 9th Dec.1876 she started a single round voyage between Bordeaux and New York and in 1880 was rebuilt to 2,023 gross tons with passenger accommodation for 43-1st, 28-2nd and 408-3rd class. She inaugurated a new service between Barrow, Dublin and New York on 27th Apr.1881, and made four round voyages on this route, the last one starting on 14th Sep.1881. In Oct.1882 she sailed from Glasgow to Liverpool and Calcutta, and in Jul.1889 sailed from New York to Naples direct. Between 1871 and 1893 she was used mainly on the Glasgow - Mediterranean - New York - Glasgow service and made 60 voyages on this route. Her last sailing commenced 3rd Jun.1893 when she left Leghorn for Naples and New York (arr.28/6) and on 15th Jan.1894 she was sold for scrap. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P. Bonsor, vol.1, p.456-7] - [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 29 September 1998]


ASSYRIA (2)
The "Assyria" was built by J.C.Tecklenborg, Geestemunde in 1898 for the Hamburg America Line. She was a 6,581 gross ton ship, length 420.7ft x beam 54.4ft, one funnel, two masts, single screw and a speed of 13 knots. There was accommodation for 50-1st and 1,200-3rd class passengers. Launched on 6th April 1898, she sailed from Hamburg on her maiden voyage to Baltimore on 3rd Sepember 1898. Her last voyage on this service commenced 11th December 1904 and she was sold to the Russian Volunteer Fleet and renamed "Sveaborg" the following year. Later the same year she went to the Russian Imperial Navy and in 1906 was returned to the Russian Volunteer Fleet and renamed "Ekaterinoslav". After the Russian revolution in 1917, she was operated by the British Shipping Controller, returned to German owners in 1925 and was scrapped at Kiel in 1928. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P. Bonsor, vol.1, p.405] [Merchant Fleets by Duncan Haws, vol.4, Hamburg America Line] - [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 30 July 1998]


ASSYRIAN
See ASSYRIAN MONARCH.


ASSYRIAN MONARCH
SS ASSYRIAN MONARCH. Built in 1880 by Earle's Shipbuilding Co., Hull, England, for the Royal Exchange Shipping Company Ltd. (Monarch Line). 3,317 tons; 109,72 meters (360 feet) long x 13,01 meters (42.7 feet) beam; straight bow, 1 funnel, 4 masts; steel construction, screw propulsion, service speed 11 knots; accommodation for 40 1st-, 1,000 3rd-class passengers. 10 August 1880, launched. 4 December 1880, maiden voyage (in ballast), Falmouth-New York (arrived 18 December). 15 January 1881, first voyage (with passengers), London-New York. 9 December 1886, last voyage, London-New York, for Monarch Line. 1887, purchased by the Allan Line and renamed ASSYRIAN; 3,970 tons. 30 September 1887, first voyage, London-Montreal. 22 November 1887, first voyage, Liverpool-Baltimore. 13 December 1889, first voyage, London- New York (3 roundtrip voyages). 3 January 1891, first voyage, Glasgow-Philadelphia. 1891-1901, mostly Glasgow-New York, Boston or Philadelphia. 24 July 1901, last voyage, Glasgow-Boston. 1901, sold. 1902, scrapped [Noel Reginald Pixell Bonsor, North Atlantic Seaway; An Illustrated History of the Passenger Services Linking the Old World with the New (2nd ed.; Jersey, Channel Islands: Brookside Publications), vol. 1 (1975), p. 317, and vol. 3 (1979), p. 1059. [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 14 August 1997]


ASTI
See BORKUM.


ASTORIA
The "Astoria" of 1911 belonged to Henderson's Anchor Line. She was built by Wm Denny & Bros, Dumbarton, Scotland in 1884 for Shaw Saville & Albion as the "Tainui". Her dimensions were 5086 gross tons, length 439.6ft x beam 46.4ft, clipper stem, two funnels, two masts, single screw and a speed of 13 knots. Accommodation for 120-1st, 180-2nd and 700-3rd class passengers. Launched on 8/9/1884 she ran on the UK - Australia - New Zealand service until 1897 when she went to the Spanish company who renamed her "Covadonga". In 1899 she reverted to Shaw Saville ownership and her previous name "Tainui". Later the same year she went to Allan Line and made her first voyage for them from Liverpool to Quebec and Montreal, commencing 11/5/1899 and her last voyage commencing 5/10/1899. She then came under the ownership of Anchor Line who reduced her masts from four to two and on 3/1/1900 started using her on their Glasgow - Moville - New York service. She continued on the transatlantic service until her last voyage commenced from Glasgow - Moville - NY - Glasgow on 10/1/1908. In Feb.1908 she was laid up and was scrapped in 1910. [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Ted Finch - 12 September 1997]


ASTRID
See ASTRONOM.


ASTRONOM
The ASTRONOM was a 3-masted, square-rigged ship, built by J. H. Bosse of Burg (now Bremen-Burg), and launched on 4 March 1863. 394 Commerzlasten/ 802 tons register; 43,1 x 8,7 x 5,9 meters (length x beam x depth of hold). Owner: 1863-1876 - Joh. Diedr. Koncke, Bremen; 1876-1891 - Carl Bohlken, Bremen; 1891-1899 - H. J. Fisser, Bremen. Master: 1863-1885 - August Klopper; Krippner; R. Krause; R. Hamer; H. Seeke; R. Schoon. In 1875, the ASTRONOM was re-rigged as a bark. In 1899, she was sold to S. M. Bjorkegren, of Simrishamn, Sweden, who renamed her ASTRID, and in 1909 re-rigged her as a lighter. Her captains under the Swedish flag were P. Thorsson (1899-1905) and A. H. T. Thorsson (from 1905). Her ultimate fate is not known [Peter-Michael Pawlik, Von der Weser in die Welt; Die Geschichte der Segelschiffe von Weser und Lesum und ihrer Bauwerften 1770 bis 1893, Schriften des Deutschen Schiffahrtsmuseums, Bd. 33 (Hamburg: Kabel, c1993), p. 396]. [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 30 November 1997]


ATALANTA (1)
The bark (a 3-masted sailing vessel, the 2 forward masts square-rigged, the mizzenmast rigged fore-and-aft) ATALANTA was built by the the shipbuilding firm of Hermann Friedrich Ulrichs, in Vegesack/Fahr (on the eastern bank of the Weser River, northwest of Bremen), and launched on 26 February 1857. 247 Commerzlasten/565 tons; 40,5 x 9,3 x 5,1 meters/ 143 x 30 x 17.5 feet (length x beam x depth of hold); International Signal Code QBHD. Principal owners of the ATALANTA were the Bremen firm of Konitzky & Thiermann, and her masters were, in turn, August Horstmann, Hinrich Gerhard Bulling, Johann von Harten, and Luder Hogemann. In 1880, the ATALANTA was purchased by C. Hartlaub, of Bremen. In July 1882, in the face of Hartlaub's mounting debts, the ATALANTA was forcibly auctioned by order of the Amtsgericht Geestem"unde, and was purchased by the Schiffahrtsgesellschaft "Astra", of Riga. The ATALANTA thus passed into Russian hands, her new master being Capt. Lindemann. In 1883, she made a passage from Swansea to Vera Cruz, returning to Europe by way of Pensacola. On 8 November 1887, the ATALANTA, Capt. Heimann, collided with the Danish bark EMIL (ex Bremen bark NORMA, built in Vegesack/Fahr by Ulrichs in 1859) off Helsingor, but sustained no major damage. On 21 November 1888, during a storm, the ATALANTA, bound from Riga to Antwerp with a cargo of wood, was stranded on the beach at Goeree, in the Netherlands; 6 members of the crew lost their lives, and the vessel was a total loss [Peter-Michael Pawlik, Von der Weser in die Welt; Die Geschichte der Segelschiffe von Weser und Lesum und ihrer Bauwerften 1770 bis 1893, Schriften des Deutschen Schiffahrtsmuseums, Bd. 33 (Hamburg: Kabel, c1993), p. 280, no. 43]. - [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 5 August 1998]


ATALANTA (2)
The "Atalanta" was built by Smith & Rodger, Glasgow as the "Ohio", but launched as the "Atalanta" in 1863 for the British owned London & New York Steamship Line. She was a 2,668 gross ton ship, length 339.1ft x beam 34.2ft, clipper stem, one funnel, four masts, iron construction, single screw and a speed of 10 knots. There was accommodation for 1st, 2nd and 500-3rd class passengers. It was attempted to launch her on 28/11/1863 but she stuck on the slipway, but floated off within a few days. She sailed from London on her maiden voyage to Havre and New York on 11/5/1864 and started her last voyage on this service on 20/3/1870. In 1870 she was sold to The Hughes Line of Liverpool who used her on their Liverpool - Suez - Bombay service. She was fitted with compound engines in 1874 and in 1880 went to British owners and was renamed "Clifton". In 1888 she became the Swedish owned "Ocean" and in September 1897 was reported in port in a damaged condition, and was scrapped. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P. Bonsor, vol.2, p.597; vol.3, p.954] - [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch 15 April 1998]


ATHENA
The Bremen ship ATHENA, Schilling, master, which arrived at New York on Saturday, 13 June 1857, 37 days from Bremen (New York Herald, 14 June 1857). I have at present no information on her, although if she was built on the Weser, Peter-Michael Pawlik, Von der Weser in die Welt; die Geschichte der Segelschiffe von Weser und Lesum und ihrer Bauwerften 1770 bis 1893, Schriften des Deutschen Schiffahrtsmuseums, 33 (Hamburg: Kabel, c1993), should contain some reference to her.[Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 27 July 1997]


ATHENIA (1)
There were two steamships named ATHENIA, both owned by the Donaldson Line, which operated from Glasgow to ports in Canada and the United States. The earlier ATHENIA, which was launched in 1903 as a cargo steamer and first sailed as a passenger steamer in 1905, was torpedoed and sunk by German submarine U-53 in August 1917. - [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 20 April 1998]


ATHENIA (2)
The "Athenia" was built in 1922 by Fairfield Co Ltd, Glasgow for the Donaldson Line of Glasgow. She was a 13,465 gross ton ship, length 526.3ft x beam 66.4ft, one funnel, two masts, twin screw and a service speed of 15 knots. There was accommodation for 516-cabin and 1,000-3rd class passengers. Launched on 28/1/1922, she sailed from Glasgow on her maiden voyage to Liverpool, Quebec and Montreal on 19/4/1923. She was used on the Cunard-Donaldson Line joint service. In March 1927 she was refitted to carry 314-cabin, 310-tourist and 928-3rd class passengers. She had the unfortunate distinction of being the first ship sunk in the war, on the day that war was declared. Torpedoed by the German submarine U.30 when 250 miles West of Inishtrahull, Northern Ireland on 3/9/1939 and sank with the loss of 128 lives. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P. Bonsor, vol.3, p.1014] - [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch -8 April 1998]

The ATHENIA (II) was built by Fairfield Co Ltd, Glasgow (order #596), for the Anchor-Donaldson (from 1935: Donaldson Atlantic) Line, and launched on 28 January 1922. 13,465 tons; 160,4 x 20,23 meters (length x breadth); 1 funnel, 2 masts, clipper stern; twin-screw propulsion, double-reduction steam turbines; accommodation for 516 cabin-class and 1,000 3rd-class passengers; crew of 300. 19 April 1923, maiden voyage, Glasgow-Liverpool-Quebec-Montreal. March 1927, passenger accommodation altered to 314 in cabin, 310 in tourist, and 928 in 3rd. 3 September 1939, torpedoed and sunk by German submarine U-30, at 56.44 N, 14.05 W, 250 miles west of Inishtrahull, Northern Ireland (the first passenger liner to be sunk in World War II by a submarine) [Noel Reginald Pixell Bonsor, North Atlantic Seaway; An Illustrated History of the Passenger Services Linking the Old World with the New (2nd ed.; Jersey, Channel Islands: Brookside Publications), vol. 3 (1979), pp. 1006 (photograph) and 1014; Arnold Kludas, Die grossen Passagierschiffe der Welt; eine Dokumentation, Bd. 2 (2nd ed.; Oldenburg/Hamburg: Gerhard Stalling, c1973), p. 194 (photograph)]. For further information on the ATHENIA (II), see the following: 1. Alastair MacTavish Dunnett, The Donaldson Line; a century of shipping, 1854-1954 (Glasgow: Jackson, 1960). - 2. P. J. Telford, Donaldson Line of Glasgow (Kendal: World Ship Society, 1989). - 3. Duncan Haws, Merchant fleets, 13: Donaldson line ([Hereford:] TCL Publications, 1989). - [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 20 April 1998]


ATHLONE CASTLE
The "Athlone Castle" was built by Harland & Wolff, Belfast in 1935 for the Union Castle Line. She was a 25,567 gross ton ship, length 725ft x beam 82.5ft, one funnel, two masts and a speed of 20 knots. There was accommodation for 242-1st and 487-cabin class passengers. Launched on 28.11.1935 by Princess Alice, Countess of Athlone, she commenced her maiden voyage from Southampton for the Cape on 22.5.1936. Throughout the war she served as a troopship and returned to service in May 1947 after refitting to accommodate 250-1st and 530-tourist class passengers. Her last voyage commenced when she left Capetown on 23.7.1965 and arrived at Southampton on 6th August after 141 round voyages to South Africa. She finally left Southampton on 16th August and arrived at Taiwan for scrapping on 13th September. [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 8 December 1997]


ATHOL
The bark ATHOL, 367 tons, built in New Brunswick in 1834, which appears in the annual volumes of Lloyd's Register of Shipping for 1834/35-1841/42. For the period 1834/35-1838/39: M'Credy, master; Robertson, owner; port of registry, St. Johns [probably St. John, NB, rather than St. Johns, Newfoundland]; port of survey, London; destined voyage, St. Johns [again, probably St. John, NB]; rating, AE1. According to a note on the Canadian Ship Information Database (http://susan.chin.gc.ca:8013/basisdbdocs/title1e.html), she was lost at Cape Sable Island, Nova Scotia. Although this note does not give a date, the ATHOL was lost probably in 1838 or 1839: although she appears in Lloyd's Register for 1839/40 through 1841/42, she is listed without a rating, indicating that she had missed a scheduled survey, and the Register continued to carry the names of such vessels until officially notified of their loss (which might be as many as three or four years after the event). Additional source: Public Archives of Canada, RG 42, Volume 1334 (original reference: vol. 123, reel C-382, page 17). [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 8 December 1997]

The ATHOL was a 367 ton wooden hulled Barque, built and registered in Saint John New Brunswick in 1834. Her registered owner was John Rob and her Captain listed as McReady. She was wrecked 1835-06-30, off Cape Sable Island at Half Moons, Barrington,(South West Nova Scotia) approx Lat 4325N, Long 06530W. This voyage had originated at Greenock, Scotland with destination Saint John, N.B. Refs: Saint John Ships And their Builders, Esther Clark Wright 1976.
Quite often the Lloyds registry was not kept up to date, particularly during the 1800's as ships changed owners frequently or were disposed of in one way or another without notifying the insurer. The Lloyds registry can be used as a starting point when researching a ship but should be quoted with extreme caution and compared to other sources, as they often contain inaccuracies pertaining to ships histories. [Posted to The ShipsList by Gery Swiggum - 8 December 1997]


ATHOS II
The "Athos II", built by Agt Ges Weser, Bremen in 1923 for the French company, Messageries Maritimes. She was a 15,275 gross ton ship, length 565ft x beam 66ft, two funnels, two masts, twin screw and a speed of 17 knots. There was accommodation for 167-1st, 156-2nd and 104-3rd class passengers, with a possible 430 deck passengers, probably for troops to Indo China. Launched on 12/11/1925, she didn't leave Bremerhaven for Marseilles until January 1927, having taken four years to complete. On 25th March 1927 she sailed from Marseilles on her maiden voyage to the Far East, and for the next nine years sailed between Marseilles, Malaya, Indo-China, Hong Kong, Shanghai, Kobe and Yokohama. In 1937 she wa completely refitted with new boilers and her machinery overhauled to give a speed of 19 knots. Her accommodation was modified to carry 84-1st, 108-2nd and 112-3rd class passengers. In 1938 she resumed the Far East service but after the outbreak of war sailed between Marseilles, Egypt and Syria. In June 1940 she was laid up at Alexandria but was allowed to repatriate crews of French ships laid up in the port. In September 1940 she brought back to France the French troops still in Syria and then sailed to Algiers where she remained until captured by the Allies in November 1942. She left in December 1942 for the USA where she was converted to an armed transport. She then made several trooping voyages between the USA and Casablanca, Southampton, Havre and Naples and in March 1946 was returned to French control. In 1948 she resumed Far East voyages, but after a couple of voyages was taken in for a major refit. She returned to the Far East run in 1950 for about four years and also carried pilgrims from Casablanca and North Africa to Jeddah. In August 1956 she was taken over by the French government for use as a troop transport for the Suez operation and then used between Marseilles and North Africa. Finally she was sold in July 1959 to Italian ship breakers and was towed to Spezia on July 31st. ["Messageries Maritimes Liner Athos II' of 1927", by Captain J.H.Isherwood; Sea Breezes Magazine, March 1973] - [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 12 March 1998]


ATLANTA
See URANIUM.


ATLANTIC (1)
The "Atlantic" was the first ship owned by the Collins Line of New York. She was a wooden built ship, built by William H Brown of New York and launched on 1/2/1849. Her engines were built by the Novelty Iron Works of NY. She was a 2845 gross ton ship, length 284ft x beam 45.9ft, straight stem, one funnel, three masts, paddle steamer and a speed of 12 knots. There was accommodation for 200 1st class passengers. She left New York on her maiden voyage to Liverpool on 27/4/1850 and in July-Aug. of that year made a record passage between NY and Liverpool. On 6/1/1851 she broke her main shaft in mid-Atlantic and arrived in Queenstown under sail on 22/1/1850, and was then towed to Liverpool. While there, she had major repairs to her machinery, new dining saloon built on deck, Mizzen (third) mast removed and 80-2nd class berths added. She ran between Liverpool and NY from 23/7/1851 until January 1858 when she was laid up until 1859 when she was bought by North Atlantic Steamship Co who used her on the NY - Aspinwall service. On 17/11/1860 she made her first voyage on the NY - Southampton - Havre service for one round voyage and in 1861 she became a Civil War transport. In 1866 she was transferred to North American Lloyd and made her first voyage for their NY - Southampton - Bremen service on 22/2/1866. In August of that year she made her last trip between NY - Southampton - Bremen - Southampton - NY (arrived 25/9/1866) and in 1867 went to the NY and Bremen Steamship Co. and made six round voyages for them between 7/2/1867 and 29/10/1867. She was scrapped in 1871. [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Ted Finch - 15 August 1997]


ATLANTIC (2)
(of 1948) See VASILISSA FREIDERIKI .


ATLANTICA
See MENTANA.


ATLANTIQUE
See AMERIQUE .


ATLAS
The "Atlas" was built by J&G.Thomson, Glasgow in 1860 for the British & North American Royal Mail Steam Packet Co (later Cunard SS Co). She was a 2,393 gross ton ship, length 339ft x beam 36.5ft, clipper stem, one funnel, three masts (rigged for sail), iron construction, single screw and a speed of 11 knots. There was capacity for 69-1st and 833-3rd class passengers. Launched on 8th Mar.1860 for Cunard's Mediterranean service as a 1,794 gross ton ship with a length of 276ft and two masts, she was lengthened in 1873, fitted with compound engines, and a mizzen (third) mast fitted. On 1st May 1873 she started her first voyage between Liverpool - Queenstown (Cobh) - Boston. Between 1873-1883 she sailed mainly between Liverpool and Boston and commenced her last voyage on this service on 25th Apr.1883. She subsequently ran Liverpool - Mediterranean and was scrapped in 1896. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P. Bonsor, vol.1, p.151-2] - [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 19 October 1998]


ATRATO
The "Atrato" was built in 1888 by R.Napier & Sons, Glasgow for the Royal Mail Steam Packet Co. She was a 5,347 gross ton ship, length 421.2ft x beam 50ft, clipper stem, two funnels, three masts, single screw and a speed of 15 knots. There was accommodation for 221-1st, 32-2nd and 26-3rd class passengers. Launched on 22/9/1888 for the West Indies service, she sailed from Southampton on her maiden voyage to Brazil, Montevideo and Buenos Aires on 17/1/1889. Subsequently she sailed between Southampton and the West Indies. In 1912 she went to the Viking Cruising Co who renamed her "The Viking", and in 1914 she was converted to an Armed Merchant Cruiser and renamed "Viknor". On 13/1/1915 she was in communication with Malin Head signal station and subsequently disappeared without trace, with the loss of 284 lives. It is probable that she struck a German mine. [South Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, p.26] There is an article and line drawings of this ship in the April 1977 issue of Sea Breezes magazine . - [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 21 January 1998]


ATTACKER
See FAIRSKY.


AUDACIOUS
See BELVEDERE.


AUGUSTA
The Barque AUGUSTA, 599 tons, launched in December 1841, for R. D. Wilmot, and was sold to Leith in 1843, was registered in Glasgow in 1845, in Sligo, in 1852, was sold from Liverpool to "foreigners" in 1870. Then she returned to the Liverpool registry as TRAVANCORE, seven entries later, and again went to Glasgow in 1871. [Saint John Ships and Their Builders, by Esther Clark Wright, DLitt.] - [Posted to The ShipsList by Gery Swiggum - 9 February 1998]


AUGUSTA VICTORIA
The "Augusta Victoria" was built for the Hamburg America Line in 1888 by A.G.Vulcan, Stettin. She was a 7,661 gross ton ship, length 462.7ft x beam 55.7ft, three funnels, three masts, twin screw and a speed of 18 knots. There was accommodation for 400-1st, 120-2nd and 580-3rd class passengers. Originally laid down as the "Normannia", she was launched on 1/12/1888 as the incorrectly named "Augusta Victoria" and commenced her maiden voyage from Hamburg to Southampton and New York on 10/5/1889. She started a winter service from Genoa to New York on 15/3/1894 and commenced her last voyage from Hamburg to Southampton and New York on 22/10/1896. In 1896-7 she was lengthened to 520.8ft by Harland & Wolff, her tonnage increased to 8,479 tons and her mainmast removed. At the same time she was given the correct name of "Auguste Victoria". On 3/6/1897 she resumed the Hamburg - Southampton - New York service and on 8/4/1903 commenced her last voyage from Naples to Genoa and New York. She sailed from Hamburg on her final voyage to Southampton and New York on 16/1/1904 and was sold to Russia in May of that year. Renamed "Kuban" and used as a Russian auxiliary cruiser and troopship in the Russo-Japanese War, she was eventually scrapped at Stettin in 1907. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.1,p.395] [Merchant Fleets in Profile by Duncan Haws, vol.4 Hamburg America Line] [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Ted Finch - 15 August 1997]

The AUGUSTA VICTORIA was laid down as the NORMANNIA by A.G. Vulcan, Stettin (ship #183), for the Hamburg America Line, but launched on 1 December 1888 as the AUGUSTA VICTORIA, after Auguste Victoria, wife of the Emperor Wilhelm II. (the error in the first name was not discovered until after the launching, and was officially changed in 1897). 7,661 tons; 140,5 (144,8) x 16,9 meters (length x breadth); straight bow, 3 funnels, 3 masts; steel construction, twin-screw propulsion, triple-expansion engines (13,500 psi), service speed 19 knots; accommodation for 400 passengers in 1st class, 120 in 2nd class, and 580 in steerage; crew of 245. The AUGUSTA VICTORIA was the first German express steamer, and the type-ship of the Augusta-Victoria Class. 10 May 1889, maiden voyage, Hamburg-Southampton-New York. 22 January 1891, first pleasure cruise by any commercial passenger ship, to the Mediterranean and the Near East. 15 March 1894, first voyage, Genoa-New York. 2 October 1896, last voyage, Hamburg-Southampton-New York. 1897, refitted by Harlan & Wolff, Belfast: 8,479 tons, lengthened to 163,1 meters, 2 masts, name corrected to AUGUSTE VICTORIA. 3 June 1897, resumed Hamburg-Southampton-New York service. 8 April 1903, last voyage, Naples-Genoa-New York. 16 January 1904, last voyage, Hamburg-Southampton-New York. May 1904, sold to the Russian Navy, renamed KUBAN, rebuilt as auxiliary cruiser. May 1907, scrapped at Stettin [Arnold Kludas and Herbert Bischoff, Die Schiffe der Hamburg- Amerika-Linie, Bd. 1: 1847-1906 (Herford: Koehler, 1979), p. 50 (photograph c1900); Noel Reginald Pixell Bonsor, North Atlantic Seaway; An Illustrated History of the Passenger Services Linking the Old World with the New (2nd ed.; Jersey, Channel Islands: Brookside Publications), vol. 1 (1975), p. 395]. Also pictured in Michael J. Anuta, Ships of Our Ancestors (Menominee, MI: Ships of Our Ancestors, 1983), p. 19 (after 1897), and in Clas Broder Hansen, Passenger liners from Germany, 1816-1990, translated from the German by Edward Force (West Chester, Pennsylvania: Schiffer Pub., c1991), p. 37 (before 1897). - [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 4 July 1998]


AUGUSTE VICTORIA
See AUGUSTA VICTORIA.


AUGUSTINE
See GRANTULLY CASTLE .


AUGUSTUS WATTENBACH
The ship AUGUSTUS WATTENBACH was built under special survey by R. C.Rickmers in 1855 (completed ["seefertig"] on 30 August 1855), the third of three vessels commissioned by Wattenbach & Heilgers from Rickmers. (The other vessels were the WINTERTHUR, 648 brutto register tons, built in 1853, and the IDA ZIEGLER, 955 brutto register tons, built in 1854.) Her dimensions on completion were given as 64 x 11.56 meters (length x beam), her tonnage as 1,595 brutto register [Otto Hover, Von der Galiot zum Funfmaster: unsere Segelschiffe in der Weltschiffahrt 1780-1930 (Bremen: Angelsachsen-Verlag, 1934), pp. 265-266]. (Incidentally, Hover states that the proprietors of Wattenbach & Heilgers came originally from Switzerland.) The annual volumes of Lloyd's Register of Shipping for 1856/57-1873/74 contain the following information on the AUGUSTUS WATTENBACH: Name: 1856/57-1860/61 - AUGUSTUS WATTENBACH; 1861/62-1873/74 - KING OF ITALY. Built: Bremen [Bremerhaven], 1855. Tonnage:1856/57-1860/61 - 1282 tons; 1861/62-1873/74 - 1363 tons. Measurements (1863/64): 219.6 x 37.5 x 22.7 feet (length x beam x depth of hold). Rig: Ship. Master: 1856/57 - Kersting; 1857/58-1860/61 - J. C. Clare; 1861/62-1862/63 - R. Norris; 1862/63-1863/64 - E. Marshall; 1863/64-1873/74 - H. Brown. Owner: 1856/57-1860/61 - Wattenbach; 1861/62-1866/67 - Higgin & C; 1866/67-1873/74 - E. Gennys. Registry: 1856/57-1866/67 - London; 1866/67-1873/74 - Plymouth. Port of Survey: 1856/57-1859/60 - Liverpool; 1860/61 - London; 1861/62-1862/63 - Hartlepool; 1862/63-1863/64 - London; 1863/64-1873/74 - Liverpool. Destined Voyage: 1856/57 - India; 1857/58-1859/60 - Calcutta; 1860/61 - [not given]; 1861/62-1862/63 - Australia; 1863/64 - India; 1864/65 - India [crossed out]; 1865/66-1873/74 - [not given]. I do not at present know the ultimate fate of the KING OF ITALY, ex AUGUSTUS WATTENBACH. Although the vessel last appears in Lloyd's Register for 1873/74, the entries in the last volumes for 1868/69 onwards are clearly continuations of the entry in the volume for 1867/68; she was last surveyed in February 1865. - [E-mail from Michael Palmer - 23 September 1998]


AURELIA
See BEAVERBRAE .


AUSTRAL
The "Austral" was a 5,524 gross ton ship, built by John Elder, Glasgow in 1881 for the Orient Line (which later became part of the P&O group). There was accommodation for 120-1st, 130-2nd and 300-3rd class passengers. She started her maiden voyage from London via Suez to Melbourne and Sydney on 18/1/1882. Her second voyage was a catalogue of misfortunes which started with a series of engine defects while on passage from London to the Cape, where she was detained at Simons Bay for a week due to an epidemic of small-pox ashore. More engine trouble was encountered during her passage from the Cape and at one time she was forced to maintain steerage way by means of sail alone until repairs could be effected. On 11/11/1882 she sank at her coaling berth at Sydney, and on 28/3/1883 was refloated and temporarily repaired at Cockatoo Island. Between 1883-4 she was refitted on the Clyde and in April 1884 was chartered to the Anchor Line and used on their Liverpool - New York route. On 12/11/1884 she resumed London - Sydney sailings and started her last voyage on this service on 21/11/1902. She was then sold to Italian shipbreakers and scrapped at Genoa. [North Star to Southern Cross by John M.Maber] - [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 15 February 1998]


AUSTRALASIAN
See RUAPEHU (2).


AUSTRAL GLADE
See GENERAL A.W.GREELY.


AUSTRALIA (1) See ALFRED.


AUSTRALIA (2)
The Anchor Line ship "Australia" was built by Robert Duncan & Co, Port Glasgow (engines by Finnieston Steamship Works, Glasgow) in 1870. This was a 2,244 gross ton ship, length 324.6ft x beam 35.2ft, clipper stem, one funnel, three masts (rigged for sail), iron construction, single screw and a speed of 12 knots. There was passenger accommodation for 128-cabin and 600-steerage class. Launched on 20/1/1870, she commenced her maiden voyage from Glasgow to Moville and New York on 11/3/1870. In February 1876 she made a single voyage between Glasgow, Mediterranean ports, New York and London and on 13/5/1876 started London - New York sailings. In 1877 she was fitted with compound engines by D&W.Henderson and started the last of 33 London - New York voyages on 24/3/1881. In 1881 she made 5 London - Halifax - Boston sailings and between 1881-1884 made 8 voyages between Glasgow, Mediterranean, New York and Glasgow. Between 1882-1883 she made 2 sailings from Glasgow to Liverpool and Bombay and in 1883 made a single Glasgow - Liverpool - Calcutta voyage. From 1884-1885 she was used for 11 round voyages between London, Halifax and Boston and from 1886-1891 made 14 Glasgow - Mediterranean - New York - Glasgow voyages. Her last voyage commenced 11/4/1891 when she left Palermo for Naples, New York(arr. 8/5/1891) and Glasgow. On 12/5/1892 she was sold to Furness Withy & Co, West Hartlepool, was laid up in 1893 and scrapped the following year. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P. Bonsor, vol.1, p.455] [Merchant Fleets by Duncan Haws, vol.9, Anchor Line] - [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 6 May 1998]


AUSTRALIA (3)
Built by John Elder & Co, Glasgow in 1875 for Sir William Pearce, she was to have been named "Nova Cambria", but was launched as the "Australia". She was a 2,737 gross ton ship, length 376ft x beam 37ft, one funnel, four masts (barquentine rigged for sail), iron construction, single screw and a speed of 13 knots. There was accommodation for 170-1st, 30-2nd and 100-3rd class passengers. She sailed from London in Jan.1876 for Melbourne and was then operated by Pacific Mail Steamship Co. Although Pacific Mail was an American company, the "Australia" and her sister ship "Zealandia" operated under the British flag and with British officers and Chinese crews. She commenced San Francisco to Auckland and Sydney sailings on 17th July 1876 and made calls at Honolulu and Fiji. She made her last voyage under the British flag towards the end of 1885 and was then sold to the Oceanic Steamship Co and transferred to Hawaiian registry. The service was taken over by Oceanic SS Co jointly with the Union SS Co of New Zealand. The "Australia" later became an American transport running to the Philippines. In 1905 she was chartered to the Russian government and used as a transport until captured on 26th Aug.1905 by the Japanese in Petropavlovsk Harbour while carrying supplies from the US to Siberia. [North Star to Southern Cross by John M.Maber] [Pacific Steamers by Will Lawson] I don,t have any info on this ship after this date, but there is a photo of her in North Star to Southern Cross by John M.Maber, published by T.Stephenson & Sons, 1967. - [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 27 August 1998]


AUSTRALIA (4)
The "Australia" of 1882 was built by C.Mitchell & Co. of Walker-on-Tyne, England, in 1881 for the Carr Line of Germany. She was a 2119 gross ton vessel, length 297.9ft x beam 37.1ft, one funnel, two (extremely tall) masts, iron construction, single screw and a speed of 10 knots. There was accommodation for 800-3rd class passengers only. Launched on 16/4/1881, she sailed from Hamburg on her maiden voyage to New York on 9/6/1881 and commenced her last Hamburg - New York run for this company on 9/5/1888. In May 1888, she went to the Hamburg America Line and resumed sailing from Hamburg to New York on 3/7/1888 for three round voyages. Transferred to the Stettin - NY service on 14/6/1889 for one round voyage and commenced her last run from Hamburg to Baltimore on 5/2/1896. On 26/1/1902 she stranded in the River Scheldt near Antwerp and on 27/1/1902 she broke in two. [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Ted Finch - 10 September 1997]


AUSTRALIS
See AMERICA (5).


AUSTRIAN
The "Austrian" was a 2,458 gross ton ship, built by Barclay & Curle, Glasgow in 1867 for the Allan Line of Glasgow. Her details were - length 319ft x beam 38.5ft, clipper stem, one funnel, three masts (rigged for sail), iron construction, single screw and a speed of 11 knots. There was accommodation for 115-1st and 600-3rd class passengers. Launched in Feb 1867, she sailed from Liverpool on her maiden voyage to Quebec and Montreal on 18/7/1867. On 10/10/1871 she commenced her first voyage between Liverpool, Halifax, Norfolk and Baltimore. She was fitted with compound engines in 1875 by J.Jack, Rollo & Co, Liverpool and on 25/1/1876 resumed Liverpool - St John's NF - Halifax - Baltimore voyages. On 30/5/1876 she started Glasgow - Quebec - Montreal voyages and on 20/12/1879 made her first Glasgow - Boston voyage. On 13/5/1885 she made her first Glasgow - Philadelphia run. She was fitted with triple expansion engines by J.Howden & Co, Glasgow in 1888, and on 29/12/1888 resumed Glasgow - Boston service. On 11/5/1889 she commenced sailings between Glasgow and South America and on 20/5/1893 started running between London, Quebec and Montreal. Between 1896-1901 she was used mainly on the Glasgow - S.America service until 30/4/1902 when she resumed the Glasgow - Boston route. She commenced her last N.Atlantic crossing between Glasgow and Boston on 10/4/1903 and her last Glasgow - S.America voyage on 9/2/1904. In 1905 she was scrapped. [ North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.1, p.312] The Montreal Ocean Steamship Co was commonly known as the Allan line between 1854-1897. On 19/6/1897 the Montreal Ocean SS Co ceased to exist and a limited liability company called Allan Line Steamship Co Ltd, was formed. They were, to all intents and purposes the same company. [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 8 January 1998]

The Austrian, of the Allan Line, was a 2,458 ton ship which was built in 1867. Refitted several times, she was used on the Canadian and the South American service until she was scrapped in 1905. [E-Mail from Marj Kohli - 10 Mar 1998]


AVOCA
See URANIUM.


HTML and compilation format
Copyright 1997- 2001 Louis S. Alfano
All rights reserved.


Return to main page.