M

MAAS
The "Maas" of 1873 was a 1,705 gross ton ship, length 255.3ft x beam 35.1ft, straight stem, one funnel, two masts, iron construction, single screw and a speed of 10 knots. There was accommodation for 8-1st and 288-3rd class passengers. Built by Henderson, Coulborn & Co, Glasgow for the Dutch company, Plate, Reuchlin & Co, she was launched on 19/8/1872. She left Rotterdam on her maiden voyage to Halifax (for coal) and New York on 20/11/1872. In April 1873, Plate, Reuchlin ceased operations due to lack of capital and she went, with the rest of their assets, to the newly formed Holland America Line. On 1/6/1873 she commenced her first voyage for her new owners, from Rotterdam to New York, and her last voyage started on 8/4/1883. Later the same year she was renamed "Maasdam" and on 25/8/1883 resumed Rotterdam - New York sailings. On 24/10/1884 she was destroyed by fire at sea with no loss of life. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.3, p.909] - [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 4 February 1998]


MAASDAM (1)
See MAAS .


MAASDAM (2)
The "Maasdam" was built by Harland & Wolff, Belfast in 1871 as the "Republic" for the White Star Line. She was a 3,984 gross ton ship, length 420ft x beam 40.9ft, one funnel, four masts, iron construction, single screw and a speed of 14 knots. There was accommodation for 166-1st and 1,000-3rd class passengers. Launched on 4th Jul.1871, she left Liverpool on her maiden voyage to Queenstown and New York on 1st Feb.1872. Her last voyage on this service commenced 16th Jan. 1889 and she was then sold to Holland America Line and renamed "Maasdam". Re-engined by G.Forrester & Co, Liverpool, and refitted to carry 150-1st, 60-2nd and 800-3rd class passengers, she started Rotterdam - New York sailings on 15th Mar.1890. In 1899 she was again refitted to accommodate 2nd and 3rd class passengers only, and on 6th Mar. 1902 commenced her last voyage between Rotterdam, Boulogne and New York. In 1902 she went to Italian owners and was renamed "Vittoria" and later the same year was sold to La Veloce of Genoa and renamed "Citta di Napoli". Refitted to carry 1,424-3rd class passengers, she started sailings between Genoa, Naples and New York on 30th Sep. 1902. Her thirtieth and last voyage on this route commenced 27th Apr. 1907 and she was sold in 1908 and scrapped at Genoa in 1910. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P. Bonsor, vol.2, p.756] - [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 18 September 1998]


MAASDAM (3)
See STEFAN BATORY .


MACASSAR
See SLAVONIA.


MACEDONIA
See IOWA (2) .


MADISON
See SAALE.


MADONNA
The "Madonna" was built by Swan, Hunter & Wigham Richardson, Wallsend on Tyne in 1905 for the Fabre Line of Marseilles. She was a 5,537 gross ton ship, length 430.9ft x beam 48ft, two funnels, two masts, twin screw and a speed of 16 knots. There was accommodation for 54-1st and 1,650-3rd class passengers. Launched on 23/1/1905, she sailed from Marseilles on her maiden voyage to Naples and New York on 29/4/1905. She sailed under the British flag until 17/6/1906 when she left Marseilles under the French flag bound for Naples and New York. In 1912, accommodation for 60-2nd class passengers was added. On 30/5/1919 she commenced her first voyage after the Armistice, from Marseilles to Oran and New York with cabin and 3rd class passengers. On 10/3/1925 commenced her last transatlantic voyage between Constantinople, Piraeus, Leghorn, New York and Marseilles, and from 1927 onwards was used on the West Africa service. She was scrapped in Italy in May 1934. [ North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.3, p.1134] [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch 13 December 1997]


MADRID
The MADRID was built as the SIERRA NEVADA (II) by AG Vulcan, Stettin (Bau-Nr. 666), for Norddeutscher Lloyd's South American service, and was launched on 2 May 1922. 8,741 tons; 133,50 x 17,25 meters (length x breadth); 2 funnels (the second of which was a dummy, to make the vessel appear larger), 2 masts; twin-screw propulsion, 4,400 horsepower, service speed 13.5 knots; accommodation for 112 passengers in 1st class, 82 in 2nd class, and 1,115 in 3rd class. 16 September 1922, maiden voyage, Bremen-New York (2 roundtrip voyages). 1922, first voyage, Bremen-South America. July 1925, renamed MADRID; passenger accommodation reconfigured to 221 in cabin class, 416 in 3rd-class dormitories; accommodation later reconfigured to 249 in cabin class, 274 in 3rd-class cabins, and 301 in 3rd-class dormitories. 16 May 1934, sold to the Hamburg - Sudamerikanische Dampfschiffahrts-Gesellschaft, but continued to be registered in Bremen. September 1939, at Las Palmas. 30 November 1940, ordered home; second blind stack removed. 11 December 1940, left Las Palmas for Penhoet (arrived 28 December). 15 February 1941, auxiliary/dormitory ship for submarine crews. 9 December 1941, sunk by British air attack off Den Helder, Holland, with the loss of 12 lives [Edwin Drechsel, Norddeutscher Lloyd Bremen, 1857-1970; History, Fleet, Ship Mails (Vancouver: Cordillera Pub. Co., c1994-c1995), vol. 2, p. 26, no. 289]. Drechsel's book contains several nice photographs of the SIERRA NEVADA, but unfortunately none from the time she was known as the MADRID. [E-mail from Michael Palmer - 14 January 1998]


MAGALLANES
See ALASKA (1).


MAGDALENE
The bark MAGDALENE was built by Johann Lange, Vegesack/Grohn, and launched on 15 March 1847 for the Bremen firm of D. H. Watjen & Co.; she was named after the eldest daughter of C. H. Watjen. 167 Commerzlasten/340 tons register; 32,8 x 8,4 x 4,4 meters (length x beam x depth of hold). 30 April 1847, maiden voyage to New York. Under captains Johann Heinrich Kuhlmann and Gerhard Bremer she carried passengers to either New York or New Orleans, returning with a cargo of either tobacco or cotton. 27 October 1855, last voyage under the Bremen flag to New York. She then proceeded with a cargo of cotton to Genoa, where she was sold to Fratelli Rossi, of Genoa, renamed CARLOTTA, and placed under the flag of the kingdom of Sardinia. Her new captain was A. Chiozzia. The CARLOTTA appears in the records until the mid-1860's; her ultimate fate is not known at present [Peter-Michael Pawlik, Von der Weser in die Welt; Die Geschichte der Segelschiffe von Weser und Lesum und ihrer Bauwerften 1770 bis 1893, Schriften des Deutschen Schiffahrtsmuseums, Bd. 33 (Hamburg: Kabel, c1993), p. 211]. [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 10 December 1997]


MAGDALENE WILHELMINE
The MAGDALENE WILHELMINE was built in Karlshamn, Sweden, in 1822. I have no record of here measurements, but her cargo capacity was rated at 60 Commerzlasten, or about 85 register tons. She had originally been owned in Altona--now part of Hamburg, but in the 19th century a port city in the kingdom of Hannover--and was known first as MARTIN LUTHER, and later as MARIA HENRIETTE. On 14 June 1832, she was purchased from Schagen, of Altona, by the Hamburg merchant Matthias Diederich August Segnitz, who on 14 March 1842 sold her to Willem Smitt, also of Hamburg. Master: 1832-1834 - H. J. Schagen [presumably her prior owner]; 1834-1838 - N. Quedens; 1838-1841 - C. A. Nueschke; 1842-1845 - W. Smitt [owner]. Voyages: 1832 - Port au Prince; 1832/1833 - Port au Prince/Jeremie, Haiti; 1833 - Bilbao/Malaga; 1833/1834 - Madeira/Port au Prince; 1834 - Malaga; 1834/1835 - Port au Prince; 1835 - Port au Prince/Santo Domingo; 1835/1836 - Port au Prince; 1836/1837 - Malaga/intermediate ports/Santiago de Cuba; 1837 - New York/Puerto Rico; 1837/1838 - St. Thomas; 1838 - Port au Prince; 1838/1839 - Jersey/Lisbon; 1839 - Boston, Massachusetts/Malaga; 1840 - Le Havre/Rio de Janeiro; 1840/1841 - Rio de Janeiro; 1841 - Madera/Rio de Janeiro; 1842/1845 - Algiers/intermediate ports/Gibraltar; 1845 - Port au Prince. The MAGDALENE WILHELMINE disappeared in 1845, on a voyage from Santo Domingo to Hamburg [Walter Kresse, ed., Seeschiffs-Verzeichnis der Hamburger Reedereien, 1824-1888, Mitteilungen aus dem Museum fur Hamburgische Geschichte, N. F., Bd. 5. (Hamburg: Museum fur HamburgischeGeschichte, 1969), vol. 2, pp. 200 and 221]. - [E-mail from Michael Palmer - 6 October 1998]


MAGUYLA
See GOTHIA.


MAIN (1)
The first "Main" was a 3,087 gross ton ship, built by Caird & Co, Greenock in 1868 for Norddeutscher Lloyd [North German Lloyd] of Bremen. Her details were - length 332ft x beam 40ft, clipper stem, one funnel, two masts, iron construction, single screw and a speed of 13 knots. There was passenger accommodation for 70-1st, 100-2nd and 600-3rd class. Launched on 22/8/1868, she sailed from Bremen on her maiden voyage to Southampton and New York on 28/11/1868. In 1878 her engines were compounded by the builders and on 6/3/1890 she commenced her last Bremen - New York voyage. On 6/3/1890 she started her final Bremen - Baltimore crossing and the following year was sold to British owners. She was destroyed by fire at Fayal, Azores on 23/3/1892. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.2,p.546] - [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 1 February 1998]

The first steamship MAIN was built by Caird & Co, Greenock (ship #146), for Norddeutscher Lloyd, and launched on 22 August 1868. 2,898 tons; 106,19 x 12,22 meters (length x breadth); clipper bow (last of the New York route ships so built), 1 funnel, 2 masts; iron construction, screw propulsion (single expansion engine, 1800 hp), service speed 12 knots; accommodation for 70 passengers in 1st class, 100 in 2nd class, and 600 in steerage. 28 November 1868, maiden voyage, Bremerhaven - Southampton - New York. 1878, engine compounded by Caird & Co (3,000 hp), new boilers, service speed 14 knots. 6 March 1890, last voyage, Bremerhaven-New York. 1891, sold to Anglo-American Steamship Co, A. Rimner Liverpool, managers. 23 March 1892, burned out at Fayal, Azores, over her full length, and left there to disintegrate [Edwin Drechsel, Norddeutscher Lloyd Bremen, 1857-1970; History, Fleet, Ship Mails, vol. 1 (Vancouver: Cordillera Pub. Co., c1994), p. 49, no. 21; Noel Reginald Pixell Bonsor, North Atlantic Seaway; An Illustrated History of the Passenger Services Linking the Old World with the New (2nd ed.; Jersey, Channel Islands: Brookside Publications), vol. 2 (1978), p. 546]. Pictured in Michael J. Anuta, Ships of Our Ancestors (Menominee, MI: Ships of Our Ancestors, 1983), p. 183, courtesy of the Peabody Essex Museum, East India Square, Salem, MA 01970. - [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 7 February 1998]


MAIN (2)
The "Main" of 1906 was the second vessel of that name owned by Norddeutscher Lloyd [North German Lloyd]. She was built in 1900 by Blohm & Voss, Hamburg and was a 10,200 gross ton ship, length 501ft x beam 58.1ft, one funnel, four masts, twin screw, and a speed of 14 knots. There was accommodation for 148-1st, 116-2nd and 2,500-3rd class passengers. Launched on 10/2/1900, she sailed from Bremen on her maiden voyage to Cherbourg and New York on 28/4/1900. On 30/6/1900, she sank after being involved in a New York dock fire and on 27/7/1900 was refloated and subsequently reconditioned at Newport News, her accommodation then being 369-2nd, 217-3rd, and 2,865-4th class passengers. On 21/8/1902 she commenced her first voyage from Bremen to New York and Baltimore and subsequently sailed between Bremen and New York and/or Baltimore. In June 1914 she made her last sailing from Bremen to Baltimore and between 1914 - 1918 was laid up at Antwerp. In 1919 she was allocated to Britain under the War Reparations scheme and in 1921 went to the French government. She was scrapped in 1925. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.2,p.562] [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 16 November 1997}


MAJESTIC
The "Majestic" was built by Harland & Wolff, Belfast in 1889 for the White Star Line. She was a 9,965 gross ton ship, length 565.8ft x beam 57.8ft, two funnels, three masts, twin screw and a speed of 19 knots. There was accommodation for 300-1st, 190-2nd and 1,000-3rd class passengers. Launched on 29/6/1889, she left Liverpool on her maiden voyage to Queenstown and New York on 2/4/1890. In 1891 she made a record crossing from Queenstown to Sandy Hook. From 1899-1900 she was used as a Boer War transport and in 1902-3 was rebuilt to 10,147 tons, new boilers, funnels heightened by 10ft, and the mizzen(third) mast removed. On 29/5/1907 she commenced her last voyage from Liverpool to Queenstown and New York and on 26/6/1907 commenced sailing between Southampton, Cherbourg and New York. She started her last voyage on this service on 14/1/1914 and was scrapped the same year at Morecombe.[North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.2,p.759] [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 4 December 1997]


MALOLO
See VASILISSA FREIDERIKI .


MALWA
The "Malwa" was built in 1908 by Caird & Co, Greenock for the Peninsular & Oriental Steam Navigation Co (P&O Line). She was a 10,883 gross ton ship, length 562ft x beam 61.2ft x depth 24.6ft, two funnels, two masts and twin screw. There was passenger accommodation for 407-1st class and 200-2nd class. Launched on October 10th 1908, she sailed from Tilbury on her maiden voyage for Columbo, Melbourne and Sydney on January 29th 1909. In 1910 she was in collision with the British steamer "Nairn" off Columbo, and in 1917 was requisitioned for use as a troopship. She resumed the Australia service on September 24th 1920 and continued on this route until December 16th 1932 when she was sold for breaking up in Japan. [Merchant Fleets, vol.1, P&O, Orient & Blue Anchor Lines by Duncan Haws] - [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 23 June 1998]


MANCHESTER IMPORTER
Built 1899, 4,028 gross tons, owners - Manchester Liners (became part of Furness Lines group). Sold to Greek owners in 1927 and renamed "Alexandra". Scrapped at Venice in 1933.[Sea Breezes Magazine, July 1958] - [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 2 November 1998]


MANCHESTER SHIPPER
The "Manchester Shipper" was built by Irvine's Shipbuilding Company, West Hartlepool (engines by W.Allan & Co, Sunderland) in 1899 for Manchester Liners. She was a 4,038 gross ton ship, length 370ft x beam 48ft (112,77m x 14,63m), one funnel, two masts, single screw and a speed of 12 knots. Launched on 18.11.1899, she was chartered to the French owned Franco-Canadian Steam Navigation Co in 1901 for three voyages. The first was undertaken in October 1901 when she sailed from Dunkirk and Bordeaux for Quebec, arriving on 27th October with 9-1st class and 217 steerage passengers. The following April, she sailed from Christiania (Oslo) to Halifax with 6-1st class and 758 steerage and in June 1902 she sailed from Havre to Halifax with 2-1st class and 233 steerage. In 1930 she was scrapped at Briton Ferry. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P. Bonsor, vol.3, p.1262] - [E-mail from Ted Finch - 20 June 1998]


MANHATTAN (1)
See WILLIAM PENN.


MANHATTAN (2) See SOLIS .


MANHATTAN (3)
The "Manhattan" was built by the New York Shipbuilding Corp, Camden, NJ in 1930 for the United States Line. She was a 24,289 gross ton ship, length overall 705ft x beam 86.3ft, two funnels, two masts, twin screw and a speed of 20 knots. There was accommodation for 582 cabin class, 461 tourist class and 196-3rd class passengers. Launched on 5/12/1931, she commenced her maiden voyage from New York to Cobh, Plymouth, Havre, Hamburg, Havre, Southampton, Cobh and New York on 10/8/1932. In 1933 her funnels were heightened and on 23/8/1939 she commenced her last voyage from New York - Cobh - Plymouth - Havre - Hamburg - Havre - Southampton - Cobh - New York. She made three voyages New York - Le Verdon (Bordeaux) - New York between Sept. and Nov.1939 and in 1940 transferred to the New York - Mediterranean service for 6 round voyages. She then made a single NY - Lisbon - NY voyage and, on 10/8/1940 sailed from New York via Panama to San Francisco. From 12/1/1941 to 3/2/1941 she was aground on a sandbank off West Palm Beach, Florida, was refloated and in 1941 became the US Troopship "Wakefield".On 3/9/1942 she was damaged by fire in the North Atlantic, abandoned but later towed to Halifax. She was reconditioned at Boston as a permanent troopship and was eventually sold in 1964 and scrapped the following year at Kearny, NJ. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.4,p.1550] There is a picture of this ship in North Atlantic Seaway, vol.4. ISBN 0905824 03 2. [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 30 November 1997]


MANILA
See SIBERIA.


MANILLA
The "Manilla" of 1900 was owned by the Navigazione Generale Italiana Line. Built by Palmers Co. of Jarrow-on-Tyne in 1873 as the "Whampoa" for the British company Watts, Milburn & Co.she was sold to Rubattino and renamed "Manilla" in 1878. In 1881 was transferred to Nav. Gen. Italiana and commenced running between Genoa, Naples and New York on 11/5/1899. She started her last voyage on this service on 28/6/1903 having made seven round voyages and was sold in 1905. She was scrapped in 1907. Her dimensions were 3910 gross tons, length 399.5ft x beam 42.2ft, clipper stem, one funnel, three masts, iron construction, single screw and a speed of 12 knots. Accommodation provided for 60-1st class 1,250-3rd class passengers. [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Ted Finch]


MANITOBAN
See OTTAWA (2).


MANITOU
The "Manitou" belonged to the British "Atlantic Transport Line" and was originally built by Furness Withy & Co Ltd, West Hartlepool for Wilson's & Furness-Leyland as the "Victoria". She was a 6849 gross ton vessel, length 475.5ft x beam 52.2ft, one funnel, four masts, single screw and a speed of 14 knots. There was accommodation for 120-1st class passengers only. Launched on 31/7/1897, she left Newcastle for New York and London on her maiden voyage on 9/1/1898 and then sailed between London and New York until her last voyage for this company, commencing 30/6/1898. She then went to the Atlantic Transport Line and made two round voyages between London and NY, before being renamed "Manitou" and continuing on the same service. On 9/2/1905 she left London on her last voyage to NY and in August 1905 commenced running for the Red Star Line between Antwerp and Philadelphia. Her accommodation was altered to carry 120-2nd class passengers and she continued for Red Star until July 1914 when she commenced her last run from Antwerp to Boston and Philadelphia. On 31/10/1914 she resumed the London - NY service for ATL for two round voyages and was then used as a British transport ship. In 1921 she went back to the Red Star Line who renamed her "Poland" and converted her to carry 1000-3rd class passengers. She sailed from Antwerp for NY on 20/1/1921 and then from NY to Hamburg, Danzig and Libau. Last voyage for this company commenced 25/5/1921 when she left Philadelphia for NY and Danzig before going to the White Star Line who used her to run between Bremen - Southampton - Quebec and Montreal for three round voyages before she became the "Natale" in 1925 and was scrapped later the same year. [Posted by Ted Finch - 11 September 1997]


MANMASCO
See SOUTHERN CROSS.


MANOUBA
See NAPOLITAN PRINCE.


MANUEL CALVO
The MANUEL CALVO was built by Sir W. G. Armstrong, Mitchell & Co., Walker-on-Tyne (engines: Hawthorn, Leslie & Co., Newcastle), and launched on 19 October 1891 as the LUCANIA, for MacIver. She never sailed for MacIver, and in 1892 was purchased by Norddeutscher Lloyd (North German Lloyd) and renamed H.H. MEIER, after the founder of the line. 5,140 tons; 128,31 x 14,63 meters (421 x 40 feet; length x beam); straight bow, 1 funnel, 3 masts; steel construction, twin-screw propulsion, service speed 13 knots; accommodation for 75 1st-, 300 2nd-, and 1,000 3rd-class passengers. 27 December 1892, maiden voyage, Bremen-Southampton-New York (46 1st-class, 259 2nd-class passengers). 20 July 1893, first voyage, Bremen-New York-Baltimore. 23 March 1894-26 July 1895, 5 roundtrip voyages, Bremen-South America. 21 September 1901, last voyage, Bremen-New York. 1901, acquired by Compania Transatlantica Espanola and renamed MANUEL CALVO; 5,617 tons; accommodation for 84 1st-, 32 2nd-, and 1,100 third-class passengers. 21 March 1902, first voyage, Genoa-Barcelona-Cadiz-New York-Havana-Vera Cruz. 10 October 1917, sailed Barcelona-Buenos Aires (may have made other South American voyages). 29 March 1919, damaged by mine off Turkish coast when repatriating 400 foreigners (151 lost). May 1931, last voyage, Barcelona-Cadiz-New York-Havana. 1936, laid up at Port Mahon, Minorca. October 1939, sailed for Cadiz; rebuilt as cargo steamer, and placed in service to New York. 1950, laid up at Santander. 1952, became DRAGO (Spanish). December 1959, scrapped in Spain [Noel Reginald Pixell Bonsor, North Atlantic Seaway; An Illustrated History of the Passenger Services Linking the Old World with the New (2nd ed.; Jersey, Channel Islands: Brookside Publications), vol. 2 (1978), pp. 523 and 556-557; vol. 3 (1979), pp. 1248, 1250, 1252, 1256; Bonsor, South Atlantic Seaway; An illustrated history of the passenger lines and liners from Europe to Brazil, Uruguay and Argentina (Jersey, Channel Islands: Brookside Publications, 1983), p. 323.] Pictured in Michael J. Anuta, Ships of Our Ancestors (Menominee, MI: Ships of Our Ancestors, 1983), p. 187, courtesy of the Peabody Essex Museum, East India Square, Salem, MA 01970 [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer]


MARATHON
The Aberdeen Line ship "Marathon" was built by Alexander Stephen & Sons, Glasgow in 1903, she was a 6,793 gross ton ship, length 138,43m x beam 16,79m (454.2ft x 55.1ft), clipper stem, one funnel, two masts, twin screw and a speed of 14 knots. The "Marathon" and her sister ship "Miltiades" were the last two ships of any size to be built with a clipper stem and figurehead. Launched on 18/11/1903, she made her maiden voyage from London for Cape Town, Melbourne and Sydney on 27/1/1904. In 1912 was lengthened to 153,57m (504.1ft), and given a second (dummy) funnel, 7,848 gross tons and accommodation for 90-1st and 150-3rd class passengers. In 1915 she became a troop transport and started her only post war commercial sailing on 21/10/1920 when she left London for Cape Town, Sydney and Brisbane. In 1921 she was sold to Pacific Steam Navigation Co, renamed "Oruba" and commenced her first Liverpool to Rio de Janeiro, Montevideo, Valparaiso, Panama Canal and Liverpool voyage on 26/5/1921. She started her second and last voyage on this service on 6/10/1921 and was then laid up at Liverpool. In 1924 she was laid up at Dartmouth and was scrapped in Germany the same year. [North Star to Southern Cross by John M.Maber][South Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor] - [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 11 July 2998]


MARBURN
See TUNISIAN.


MARCO POLO
See KAISER FRANZ JOSEF I.


MARECHAL GALLIENI
See CASSEL.


MARGLEN
See STATENDAM.


MARIA CHRISTINA
See GUGLIELMO PEIRCE.


MARIA DEL CARMEN
See PRESIDENT LINCOLN (2) .


MARIA HENRIETTE
See MAGDALENE WILHELMINE


MARIANNA
See HIGHLAND BRIGADE.


MARIANNA IV
See COSTA RICA VICTORY.


MARIANNE (1)
The MARIANNE was a bark, a 3-masted sailing vessel, the fore- and mainmasts square-rigged, the mizzenmast rigged fore-and-after, built in Elbing, East Prussia, in 1833, as the MERCUR. Dimensions (1841): 102 Commerzlasten; 99,8 x 27,6 x 15,1 Hamburg Fusse (length x beam x depth of hold) (1 Hamburger Fuss = 0,287 meters) "zwischen den Steven". 30 August 1833, purchased from Dieckmann, of Elbing, by Joachim Dav. Hinsch & Co, of Hamburg, by whom she was "sold Norwegian" in 1854. Masters: 1833-1839 - A. K. Voigt; 1838-1845 - H. C. Bock; 1845-1854 - N. S. Ries. Voyages: 1833/34 - Bahia; 1834/35 - Bahia/intermediate ports/Bahia; 1835 - Bahia; 1835/36 - Bahia; 1836 - Bahia; 1837 - Rio de Janeiro/intermediate ports/Rio de Janeiro; 1837/38 - Bahia/intermediate ports/Bahia; 1838/39 - Bahia/intermediate ports/Bahia; 1839/40 - Bahia; 1840/41 - Bahia/intermediate ports/Bahia; 1841/42 - Lisbon/Bahia; 1842/43 - Bahia; 1843 - Rio de Janeiro; 1843/45 - Freetown/intermediate ports/Sierra Leone; 1845 - St. Thomas/Puerto Plata, Santo Domingo; 1845/47 - Newcastle-upon-Tyne/intermediate ports/Rio de Janeiro; 1847 - Sierra Leone; 1847/49 - West Africa/intermediate ports/Cape Palmas, South Africa; 1849/50 - Pernambuco/Maceio, Brazil/Mayo; 1850/51 - Cape Verde Islandsd/Rio de Janeiro; 1851/52 - Bahia/intermediate ports/Antwerp; 1852/53 - Santos; 1853/54 - West Africa/Bahia.Source: Walter Kresse, ed., Seeschiffs-Verzeichnis der Hamburger Reedereien, 1824-1888, Mitteilungen aus dem Museum fur Hamburgische Geschichte, N. F., Bd. 5. (Hamburg: Museum fur Hamburgische Geschichte, 1969), vol. 1, p. 240-241. - [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 4 March 1998]


MARIANE/MARIANNE (2)
The square-rigged ship MARIANE, 673/797 tons (old style/new style), built in Quebec in 1846. The following is taken from the Wallace Ship List, maintained by the Marine Museum of the Great Lakes, Kingston, Ontario, Canada,

Vessel Name : MARIANNE
Rigging : SHIP
Tonnage : 796
Length : 139
Breadth : 28.40
Depth : 21.40
Date Built : 1846
Province Built : Quebec
Builder's Name : Richard Jeffery
Data Source : FREDERICK W. WALLACE - RECORD OF CANADIAN SHIPPING 1786-1920

According to Lloyd's Register of Shipping for 1848, master: Campbell; owner: Wardlow; port of registry: Belfast; port of survey Belfast; destined journey: Quebec [stamped underneath: New York]. She last appears in the Register for 1858: master: W. Allen; owner: Downing; port of registry: Falmouth; port of survey: Liverpool; destined voyage: Quebec. There is unfortunately nothing in the Register to suggest why the MARIANE disappeared from the Register the following year. The most likely reasons are, of course, destruction (wreck, stranding, disappearance, or scrapping) or sale "abroad". If she was wrecked, stranded, or lost, the National Maritime Museum, Greenwich, London SE10 9NF, http://www.nmm.ac.uk, may possibly be able to give you some information on the circumstances from Lloyd's List. [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 2 August 1997]


MARIA PIPA
See PRESIDENT WILSON .


MARIA VITTORIA
See TWEED.


MARINULA
The "Marinula" was a tanker. It was previously the "Santa Margharita" and later became the "Trigonia" belonging to the Anglo-Saxon Petroleum Co (now Shell Oil). She was a twin screw motorship built by Vickers Ltd at Barrow in 1919. [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 10 January 1998]


MARION
See SILVER LAKE (2) .


MARITZBURG
See CASERTA.


MARLOCH
See VICTORIAN.


MARMARA
See STATE OF PENNSYLVANIA.


MARSALA
The "Marsala" was built by A.Stephen & Son, Glasgow in 1882 for Sloman of Hamburg. She was a 2,397 gross ton ship, length 320.2ft x beam 36.2ft, one funnel, three masts, iron construction, single screw and a speed of 11 knots. There was accommodation for 600-3rd class passengers. Launched on 3/5/1882, she was used on the Australia service until 1886 when the Union Line was formed and she commenced sailing for this new company. She started her first voyage from Hamburg for New York on 2/9/1886 and continued on this service until her last voyage commenced on 7/10/1897. In 1911 she was sold to Italian owners and on 2/7/1913 was sunk in collision with the Italian vessel "Campidano" off Gianutis. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.3, p.1166] [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 29 November 1997]


MARTHA
I found the following ship in the 1887-88 Lloyd's Register of Shipping: MARTHA - Master: Captain Topp. Rigging : Steel single screw Schooner; 1 steel deck and Spar Deck with 3 tiers of beams; 8 bulkheads cemented. Tonnage : 2.107 tons gross, 2,009 under deck and 1,560 net. Dimensions : 286.4 feet long, 36.1 foot beam and 24.9 foot draught. Poop Deck 40 feet long; Bridge Deck 64 feet long; Forecastle 36 feet long. Double bottom under engine and boilers 64 feet long, 140 tons; Midship Deep Tank 36 feet long, 330 tons. Built in 1884 by G. Howaldt in Kiel. Owners : G. Howaldt. Propulsion : Compound inverted engine with 2 cylinders of 35 in. and 61 in. diameter respectively. Stroke 43 inches. Operating at 78 psi.; 250 horsepower. Engine built by same company as the hull. Port of registry : Kiel. - [Posted to The ShipsList by Gilbert Provost - 24 September 1998]


MARTHA WASHINGTON
The "Martha Washington" was built by Russell & Co, Port Glasgow (engines by Rankin & Blackmore, Greenock)in 1907 for the Austrian company, Unione Austriaca. She was a 8,145 gross ton ship, length 460ft x beam 56ft, two funnels, two masts, twin screw and a speed of 16 knots. There was accommodation for 60-1st, 130-2nd and 2,000-3rd class passengers. Launched on 7/12/1907, she sailed from Glasgow on her maiden voyage to New York in ballast on 16/4/1908. On 23/5/1908 she commenced her first passenger voyage from Trieste to Patras, Palermo and New York and on 18/7/1914 commenced her last voyage on this service, arriving in New York on 1st August. She then took refuge in New York and in April 1917 she was seized by the US authorities. In 1922 she went to Cosulich Line of Italy and started her first sailing from New York to Algiers, Venice and Trieste on 15/12/1922, and on 27/6/1923 commenced her first voyage from Trieste to Naples, Algiers and New York. She made her last Trieste - Naples - Boston - new York crossing in September 1927 and subsequently ran to South America. In 1933 she want to Lloyd Triestino and was renamed "Tel Aviv", and in 1934 was scrapped at Trieste. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P. Bonsor, Vol.3,p.1331] [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 21 December 1997]


MARTIN LUTHER
See MAGDALENE WILHELMINE.


MARVALE
See CORSICAN. <>


MARY AND JOHN
In Charles Edward Banks, Planters of the Commonwealth, Boston, 1930, we find the following (abstracted verbatim, down to punctuation): p. 87: MARY AND JOHN, Thomas Chubb, Master. She sailed from Plymouth, England, March 20 [1630], with one hundred and forty passengers from the counties of Somerset, Dorset, and Devon under the patronage of the Reverend John White. She arrived at Nantasket May 30, and all the passengers settled at Mattapan which was renamed Dorchester. [Clapp: Memoirs.] There is no list of the emigrants. All settled at Dorchester, Massachusetts. [Banks: The Winthrop Fleet , pp. 100-05.] - [Posted to The ShipsList by Sharon Todtenbier - 13 March 1998]


MARY HEIN
See SILVER LAKE (3).


MARYLAND
S.S. Maryland ( After my Home State) Flag : Danish 4895DWT ( Deadweight Tons) Torpedoed Feb. 15,1940 Lat. 57-09 North Longitude 12-00 West Torpedoed by German Sub. U50 Captain of sub named Bauer The S.S. Maryland departed Maderia on Feb.7,1940 for Copenhagen. She radioed her position on Feb. 10th.and was reported missing thereafter. One wrecked lifeboat was found at North Uist. Sorry I have no more information. My source is Axis Submarine Sucesses by Jurgen Rohwer...Naval Institute Press - Annapolis, Md - [Posted to The ShipsList by Capt. C.J. Carroll - 20 March 1998]


MARY PHILLIPS
See HUDSON.


MASSACHUSETTS
See SOLIS .


MASSILIA (1)
There were two vessels called "Massilia" in 1902. One belonged to the Fabre Line of Marseilles and the other belonged to the Anchor Line.

The Fabre Line one was a 2965 gross ton vessel built in 1891 by Gourlay Bros. & Co. of Dundee, Scotland. Her dimensions were:- length 340ft x beam 41.2ft, one funnel, two masts, single screw and a speed of 11 knots. There was accommodation for a limited number of first class plus 1,250-3rd class passengers. She made her maiden voyage on 1.5.1891 between Marseilles - Naples - New York. In 1906 she was transferred to the Italian flag and ran between Marseilles - Almeria - NY. In 1908 she returned to the French flag and stayed on the same service. Made her last voyage in 1910 and was sold and scrapped in Italy in 1911. [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Ted Finch - 7 August 1997]


MASSILIA (2)
The Anchor Line vessel, built in 1902 made her maiden voyage in September of that year on the UK - Bombay service and did not go onto the N.America run until 1919. [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Ted Finch - 7 August 1997]


MATATUA
The Shaw Savill Line's "Matatua" was a 6,488 gross ton cargo liner, built in 1904 by Workman Clark, Belfast. Her details were - length 448ft x beam 56.4ft, and she was reputed to have the tallest funnel in the world at the time. There was accommodation for 6-1st and 200-steerage class passengers. In 1916 she had a serious fire on board while in Canadian waters and the master was killed. Sold to Arnold Bernstein of Hamburg in 1928 and renamed "Ilsenstein"; used on the Havre and later Antwerp to New York service. She sailed to Blyth for scrapping in 1939 but was later towed to Scapa Flow and was sunk there as a blockship in 1940. Demolished on site in 1951. [The Shaw Savill Line by Richard P.de Kerbrech] [North Star to Southern Cross by John M.Maber] [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P. Bonsor, vol.4, p.1633] - [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch 3 May 1998]


MATILDA WATTENBACH
. The annual volumes of Lloyd's Register of Shipping for 1854/55-1873/74 contain the following information on the MATILDA WATTENBACH, later RACEHORSE: Name: 1854/55-1863/64 - MATILDA WATTENBACH; 1863/64-1873/74 - RACEHORSE Built: Jersey 1853, under special survey. Tonnage: 1854/55-1856/57 - 1300/1058 (old measurement/new measurement); 1857/58-1863/64 - 955; 1863/64-1873/74 - 1077 Measurements (1863/64): 210 (corrected to 209.3) x 35 (corrected to 36.1) x 20 feet (length x beam x depth of hold). Rig: Ship. Master: 1854/55-1855/56 - J. Clare; 1856/57 - [not given]; 1857/58-1858/59 - Berryman; 1859/60-1860/61 - T. Denkin; 1861/62-1863/64 - W. Goudie; 1863/64-1865/66 - J. Mann; 1865/66-1867/68 - Matthews; 1867/68-1870/71 - W. Sewan; 1870/71-1873/74 - E. Peacock. Owner: 1854/55-1856/57 - Melhuish; 1857/58-1863/64 - Watenbach; 1863/64-1866/67 - "Smrthwaite &"; 1866/67-1869/70 - A. Fotheringham; 1869/70-1870/71 - Oswald & Co; 1871/72-1873/74 - [not given]. Registry: 1854/55-1856/57 - Liverpool; 1857/58-1869/70 - London; 1869/70-1870/71 - Sunderland; 1871/72-1873/74 - [not given]. Port of Survey: 1854/55-1855/56 - Jersey; 1856/57-1858/59 - Liverpool; 1859/60-1863/64 - London; 1863/64-1865/66 - Sunderland; 1865/66-1869/70 - London; 1870/71-1871/73 - Sunderland. Destined Voyage: 1854/55-1856/57 - [not given]; 1857/58-1858/59 - Calcutta; 1859/60-1861/62 - Cape of Good Hope; 1861/62-1863/64 - New Zealand; 1863/64-1865/66 - China; 1865/66-1867/68 - Freemantle; 1867/68-1869/70 - New Zealand; 1869/70-1873/74 - China, According to Marten A. Syme, Shipping arrivals and departures : Victorian ports, vol. 2: 1846-1855, Roebuck Society Publication No. 39 (Melbourne: [Roebuck Society], 1987), p. 247, the ship MATILDA WATTENBACH, 1050 tons, J. Clair[e], master, arrived at Melbourne on 27 April 1854, having sailed from Liverpool on 6 December 1853, via Lisbon (where she had called after having been dismasted), with 15 cabin and 41 intermediate passengers, and merchandise. According to Ian Hawkins Nicholson, Log of logs : a catalogue of logs, journals, shipboard diaries, letters, and all forms of voyage narratives, 1788 to 1988, for Australia and New Zealand and surrounding oceans, vol. 1, Roebuck Society Publication No. 41 (Yaroomba, Qld: The Author jointly with the Australian Association for Maritime History, [1990]), p. 335, there is a diary of this voyage, by Nathaniel Levy, in the Australian Manuscripts Collection, La Trobe Library, State Library of Victoria, in Melbourne, MS 8021; extracts in Don E. Charlwood, The Long Farewell (Ringwood, Vic., Australia: Allen Lane, 1981). The MATILDA WATTENBACH cleared for Sydney on June 7, with part of her original cargo but no passengers, but ran foul of a vessel in the bay, lost her bowsprit and rudder, and returned to port for repairs; she sailed for Sydney on 23 July 1855, and arrived there on 28 July. Copies of the Matilda Athenaeum, a newspaper published during a voyage of the MATILDA WATTENBACH from England to Calcutta in 1859/60 are held by the
National Maritime Museum in Greenwich, enter the words "matilda wattenbach" in the Keyword/Subject box. According to Nicholson, vol. 1, p. 335, notes by the Rev. S. Edger, June-6 September 1862, during the voyage to New Zealand are held by the Mitchell Library, Sydney, B1507. According to Nicholson, vol. 1, p. 432, records for two voyages of the vessel as the RACEHORSE survive:
1. Convict transport, 1077 tons, A. J. Mann, master, from Portland 26 May 1865, arrived Fremantle 10 August 1865, with 278 male convicts. The surgeon's journal of the passage is in the Public Record Office, Kew, MT32/9. Captain Mann's account, "A Boy's Voyage in a Convict Ship," written years later, is published in Blackwood's Magazine vol. 273, no. 1649 (1953); extracts from this have been published in Charles Bateson, The Convict Ships, 1787-1868 (Glasgow: Brown, Son & Ferguson, 1959).
2. Capt. M. H. Seward, from London 27 March 1868, arrived Auckland 8 July 1868, with 54 settlers; dismasted on 16 June 1868. A brief account of the voyage is published in Sir Henry Brett, White Wings, vol. 2: Founding of the provinces and old-time shipping (Auckland: Brett, 1928).
I do not at present know the ultimate fate of the RACEHORSE, ex MATILDA WATTENBACH. Although the vessel last appears in Lloyd's Register for 1873/74, the entries in the last three volumes are incomplete, the last complete entry being in the volume for 1870/71; she was last surveyed in November 1869. (In the 19th century, Lloyd's Register often continued to carry the names of vessels for several years after they were "sold foreign", lost, or scrapped, in particular if the event took place outside British home waters.) Nicholson, vol. 1, p. 432, contains a reference to general correspondence by the Foreign Office with France in 1872 concerning a vessel named RACEHORSE (Australian Joint Copying Project 3611, presumably copied from Public Record Office, FO27), but he is not certain whether this correspondence refers to the RACEHORSE ex MATILDA WATTENBACH or to a naval vessel of the same name. If, however, this correspondence does indeed concern the RACEHORSE/MATILDA WATTENBACH, she was probably lost, condemned, seized, or sold in French territorial waters, possibly (although this is only supposition on my part) - [E-mail from Michael Palmer - 23 September 1998]

The MATILDA WATTENBACH is illustrated in Frank Charles Bowen, The golden age of sail: Indiamen, packets and clipper ships ... with illustrations from contemporary engravings and paintings in the Macpherson collection (London: Halton & T. Smith/New York: Minton, Balch & Co, 1925), plate 44. Bowen's book contains the following account of the MATILDA WATTENBACH (p. 40): Wooden clipper ship, built in 1853 at St. Heliers, Jersey, by Frederick C. Clarke. Her principal owners were J. J. Melhuish, of Liverpool, and T. H. A. Wattenbach, of London. Her tonnage was 1,058, length 211.5 feet, beam 35.4 feet, and depth 20.2 feet. In her early days she traded between Liverpool and Calcutta under Captain John Clare and Captain James Berriman. After three years Wattenbach became the principal of numerous part-owners, her registry was shifted from Liverpool to London, and her tonnage altered to 954 tons. After trading for some years out of London to the Cape of Good Hope and to New Zealand she was, in 1863, acquired by Philip Blyth, of London. Next year she was sold foreign, but within a few days was bought by Alexander Fotheringham and renamed RACEHORSE [*]. Fotheringham was joined as part owner by John Smurthwaite, a Sunderland merchant, and from that port she made a voyage to Hong Kong. For the next few years she traded out of London, making voyages to Swan River and Madras, to Sydney and Demerara, to Auckland and Sydney. Further changes of ownership came in 1870 when she was bought by Thomas Ridley Oswald, Sunderland shipbuilder, and in 1872 when she was sold first to William Wilkinson, of London, and within a month or two to Thomas Redway, an Exmouth shipowner. Her last voyage under British colours was made during 1869 and 1871 from Sunderland to Hong Kong and back to London, after which she was sold foreign.[*] The "foreign" sale and the re-sale, within a few days, to the Englishman Alexander Fotheringham were to effect a change in the vessel's name, since between 1786 and 1871 British vessels were forbidden by statute (one of the measures to combat smuggling) from changing names. A shipowner could evade this provision by ostensibly selling the vessel to a foreigner, then buying it back a few days later. Upon its sale to the foreigner the vessel was considered no longer British, so a British subject who purchased it even a few days later could rename it anything he wished. - [E-mail from Michael Palmer - 25 September 1998]


MATSONIA (1)
See MONTEREY (2) .


MATSONIA (2)
See VASILISSA FREIDERIKI


MAUNGANUI
See CYRENIA .


MAURETANIA
The "Mauretania" was built by Swan, Hunter & Wigham Richardson, Wallsend-on-Tyne (engines by Wallsend Slipway Co) in 1906 for the Cunard Line. She was a 31,938 gross ton ship, overall length 790ft x beam 88ft, four funnels, two masts, four screws and a service speed of 25 knots. There was accommodation for 563-1st, 464-2nd and 1,138-3rd class passengers. Launched on 20/9/1906, she left Liverpool on her maiden voyage to Queenstown (Cobh) and New York on 16/11/1907. Between 1907 and 1924 she broke several transatlantic records, and started her last pre-war Liverpool - New York voyage on 10/10/1914. Converted to a troopship, hospital ship and then back to a troopship between 1915 and 1919, she made her first Liverpool - New York voyage after the Armistice on 25/11/1918 (still as a troopship). After being refitted as a passenger liner, she commenced Southampton - Halifax - New York voyages on 28/6/1919. Damaged by fire at Southampton on 25/7/1921, she was rebuilt to 30,696 tons, converted from coal to oil fuel, and refitted to carry 589-1st, 400-2nd and 767-3rd class passengers. She resumed Southampton - Cherbourg - New York sailings on 25/3/1922 and in April 1931 was refitted to carry 1st, tourist and 3rd class passengers. She commenced her last Southampton - Cherbourg - New York voyage on 30/6/1934 and then carried out five cruises from New York. Her last New York - Southampton crossing started on 26/9/1934, and on 1/7/1935 she left Southampton for Rosyth, where she was scrapped. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P. Bonsor, vol.1, p.157] - [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 16 July 1998]


MAY FLINT
See PERSIAN MONARCH.


MAYFLOWER (1)
"Mayflower", Built-Guernsey, Date-1834, Port of Registry-Jersey, Tonnage-69, Rig-Schooner, Master-T.Vibert, Owners-Capt. & Co., Career- Voyage, Jersey-Halifax. [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Gery Swiggum - 8 August 1997]


MAYFLOWER (2)
MAYFLOWER never sailed for the Donaldson Line. From Bonsor, _North Atlantic Seaway_ (2nd ed.; 1975-1978), vol. 2, p. 762, sub CRETIC (White Star Line):13,518 tons; 177,38 x 18,38 meters (582 x 60.3 feet); 1 funnel, 4 masts; twin screw propulsion, service speed 15 knots. Built by R. & W. Hawthorne, Leslie & Co., Hebburn-on-Tyne. 25 February 1902, launched as HANOVERIAN, for the Leyland Line (260 1st-class passengers). 19 July 1902, maiden voyage, Liverpool-Boston. 27 September 1902, last voyage, Liverpool-Boston (3 round-trip voyages). 1903, MAYFLOWER (Dominion Line); 260 1st-, 250 2nd-, 1000 3rd-class passengers. 9 April 1903, first voyage, Liverpool-Boston. 22 October 1903, last voyage, Liverpool- Boston (7 round-trip voyages). 1903, CRETIC (White Star). 9 November 1903, first voyage, Liverpool-Boston (10 round-trip voyages). November 1904, first voyage, Boston-Naples-Genoa-Naples-Boston-New York (arrived 7 December). 21 November 1911, last voyage, (Genoa)-Naples-New York. March 1912, first voyage, Genoa-Naples-Boston. 17 March 1915, first voyage, Genoa-Naples-Boston-New York. January 1918, last voyage, Genoa-Naples-Boston (arrived 30 January)-Liverpool. April 1918, first voyage, Liverpool-New York. 5 September 1919, last voyage, Liverpool-New York. 24 September 1919, resumed New York-Naples-Genoa; 300 1st-, 210 2nd-, 800 3rd-class passengers. 18 October 1922, last voyage, Genoa-Naples-New York. 1923, DEVONIAN (Leyland Line); 12,153 tons; 250 cabin-class passengers. June 1923, first voyage, Liverpool-Boston (arrived 24 June). April 1926, cabin became tourist third cabin. 10 December 1927, first voyage for Red Star Line (chartered), New York-Plymouth-Antwerp. 9 March 1928, last voyage, Antwerp-Southampton-New York (3 round-trip voyages). 23 March 1928, sailed New York-Philadelphia. 15 September 1928, last voyage, Boston-Liverpool (2 1/2 round-trip voyages). 1929, scrapped at Bo'ness. [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 27 July 1997]


MAYOTTE
See ORANASIA .


McPHERSON
See OBDAM.


MEADE
See CITY OF BERLIN.


MEDIATOR
The MEDIATOR was a 3-masted, square-rigged ship, built in New York by Westervelt & Roberts, launched in 1836, and registered at New York on 5 December 1836. 660 tons; 138' 4" x 32' 6" x 21' (length x beam x depth of hold). She served in the Black X Line of New York-London packets from 1837 to 1848, during which time her average westward passage time was 36 days, her shortest being 25 days, her longest 54 days. In 1848, because of her small size and her age, she was transferred from the "prestige" transatlantic packet service to the New York & New Orleans Line of coastal packets, where she served until 1860; during this period her average passage between New York and New Orleans was 16.9 days, her shortest being 12 days, her longest 22 days [Robert Greenhalgh Albion, Square-riggers on Schedule; The New York Sailing Packets to England, France, and the Cotton Ports (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1938), pp. 39, 45, 68, 126, 137, 282, 294, 316, 332, 333, 340, 342; William Armstrong Fairburn, Merchant Sail (Center Lovell, ME: Fairburn Marine Educational Foundation, [1945-1955]), II.1147, 1148, 1149, 1158, 1206, 1212, 1224, 1295; V.2780, 2797; Carl C. Cutler, Queens of the Western Ocean; The Story of America's Mail and Passenger Sailing Lines (Annapolis: United States Naval Institute, c1961), pp. 391, 512, 517, and 526; Forrest R. Holdcamper, List of American-flag Merchant Vessels that received Certificates of Enrollment or Registry at the Port of New York, 1789-1867 (Record Groups 41 and 36), National Archives Publication No. 68-10, Special Lists No. 22 (Washington, DC: National Archives and Records Administration, 1968), p. 471]. I do not have any information at present on the later history or ultimate fate of the MEDIATOR. [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 14 November 1997]


MEDINA
See STATE OF PENNSYLVANIA.


MEDITERRANEO
See CITY OF CORK.


MEDWAY
The "Medway" belonged to the British Colonial SS Co, which, in 1872 became the Temperley Line. The company name was changed because in 1867, the former Colony of Canada became the Dominion of Canada and the previous name was not thought appropriate The "Medway" was built by T.R.Oswald & Co, Sunderland in 1865. She was an 1,823 gross ton vessel, length 285.2ft x beam 35.4ft, clipper stem, one funnel, two masts, iron construction, single screw and a speed of 10 knots. Launched in March 1865, she was chartered to Hiller & Strauss in 1867 and commenced her first voyage for them in April 1867, from Antwerp to New York. She made three round voyages for them on this service, the last starting on 9/9/1867. On 29/7/1869 she commenced her first voyage for the Temperley Line from London to Quebec and Montreal. On 6/9/1873 she was wrecked in the Straits of Belle Isle. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.2,p.671] [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 23 November 1997]


MEGANTIC
MEGANTIC, White Star Line, 15,000 GRT, 565' x 67' built by Harland & Wolff at Belfast as ALBANY for Dominion Line but transfered to White Star before launch. Launched Dec 10 1908. She made her maiden voyage Liverpool-Montreal June 17 1909. During WWI she served as a troopship returning to Liverpool-New Yotk service in 1918, then Liverpool-Montreal service in 1919. In service for British Government she sailed Liverpool- Sydney in 1920. In 1927 she made a voyage to China as a troop transport. In 1928 she sailed London-Halifax-New York then Liverpool-Montreal service. In 1931 Liverpool-Montreal until she was laid up due to world recession in July 1931. Feb 1933 she was broken up in Osaka. Her sister ship was the LAURENTIC.[Posted to the Jewishgen Mailing List by Jeffrey Smith - 9 October 1997] After their arrest, the infamous Dr.Crippen and his secretary Ethel Le Neve were escorted back to England on the MEGANTIC. [Additional information via E-mail from David Bell - 29 December, 1997]

The "Megantic" was built by Harland & Wolff, Belfast in 1908. Originally laid down as the "Albany" for the Dominion Line, she was purchased on the stocks by White Star Line and launched as the "Megantic". This was a 14,878 gross ton ship, length 550.4ft x beam 67.3ft, one funnel, two masts, twin screw and a speed of 16 knots. There was accommodation for 230-1st, 430-2nd and 1,000-3rd class passengers. Launched on 10th Dec.1908, she sailed from Liverpool on her maiden voyage to Quebec and Montreal on 17th Jun.1909. On 30th Nov.1914 she started her first Liverpool - New York voyage and commenced her last sailing on this route on 21st Apr.1915. On 6th Apr.1917 she came under the liner requisition scheme and was used for government wartime services. In April 1918 she resumed Liverpool - New York sailings and started her last voyage on this service on 1st Apr.1919. Refitted to accommodate 325-1st, 260-2nd and 550-3rd class passengers, she resumed Liverpool - Quebec - Montreal voyages in May 1919. On 9th Jan.1920 she sailed Liverpool - Sydney for the British government and in May 1924 she became cabin and 3rd class only. She made one voyage to China as a troop transport in 1927 and in March 1928 became cabin, tourist and 3rd class. On 22nd Mar.1928 she sailed London - Havre - Southampton - Halifax - New York and on 19th Apr.1928 commenced her first London - Havre - Southampton - Quebec - Montreal voyage. Her last voyage on this service started on 16th May 1931 and she was then laid up at Rothesay, Scotland. In Feb.1933 she sailed to Osaka, Japan where she was scrapped. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P. Bonsor, vol.2, p.764] [Great Passenger Ships of the World by Arnold Kludas, vol.1] - [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 28 October 1998]


MELITA (1)
The "Melita" was a 1,254 gross ton ship, built for Cunard in 1853 by Alexander Denny, Dumbarton (engines by Macnab & Clark, Greenock). Her details were - length 233ft x beam 29ft, clipper stem, one funnel, two masts(rigged for sail), iron construction, single screw and a speed of 9 knots. Launched on 27/3/1853, she was used on the Mediterranean service until 13/6/1860 when she sailed from Liverpool to Quebec and Montreal under charter to the Allan Line. After this single round voyage, she did a voyage for Cunard, leaving Liverpool on 5/9/1860 for Halifax and New York. In 1861 she was acquired by William Denny in part payment for the "Sidon" and in 1863 went to S & S.Isaac. On 2/6/1866 she commenced sailings between Liverpool - Queenstown - Boston - Philadelphia on charter to the Warren Line. She started her last voyage on this service on 28/7/1868 and on 27/8/1868 sailed from Boston for Liverpool, but was destroyed by fire at sea on 5th September. All the passengers and crew were rescued by the sailing ships, "Jacob A.Stamler" and "Monequash" [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P. Bonsor, vol.1, p.145-6] - [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 23 April 1998]


MELITA (2)
The "Melita" was laid down by Barclay, Curle & Co. of Glasgow in 1913. She was originally ordered by Hamburg America Line but, due to the Great War was bought by Canadian Pacific. Eventually launched on 21/4/1917. She was a 13,967 gross ton vessel, length 520ft x beam 67.2ft, two funnels, two masts, three screws and a speed of 15 knots. She had accommodation for 550-cabin class and 1,200-3rd class passengers. On 2/6/1917 she was towed to Belfast for engining and on 25/1/1918 she left Liverpool on her maiden voyage to St John NB. In 20/8/1918 she commenced running between Liverpool and New York. On 10/12/1918 she went back to the Liverpool - St John NB service and in 1919 did one voyage from Glasgow to Bombay for the British government. In Dec.1920 she was overhauled at Antwerp and on 10/5/1922 commenced running between Antwerp - Southampton - Quebec - Montreal. In 1925 she was completely refitted at Jarrow and her tonnage increased to 15,183 tons, and in 1926 her accommodation altered to 206-cabin, 546-tourist and 588-3rd class passengers. On 16/3/1927 she left Antwerp on her last voyage to Southampton and St John NB and on 15/4/1927 was transferred to the Glasgow - Belfast - Quebec - Montreal service. On 18/3/1932 she made her last voyage on this run and was then used for cruising until April 1935 when she was sold and towed to Genoa for scrapping, but was bought by Italia , renamed "Liguria" and used as a transport ship. In July 1940 she was damaged in an air attack on Tobruk and on 22/1/1941 scuttled in the Tobruk Roads, later raised and seized by the British. In 1950 she was towed to Savona and scrapped. [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Ted Finch - 12 September 1997]


MEMFI
See GOTTARDO .


MEMPHIS
The MEMPHIS (officially so, but referred to in contemporary newspapers as the BELLE MEMPHIS) was a side-wheel packet, built in Jeffersonville, Indiana, by Howard, in 1860. 645 tons; 263 x 38 x 7 ft (length x beam x depth of hold); wood hull; engines, inside diameter of cylinder 27 in, length of stroke 8 ft; 4 boilers, each 44 in by 24 ft. Norman S. Russell's paper on American river steamers, in Transactions of Naval Architects, 2 (1861), contains three detailed drawings of her. She frequently served as a U.S. army transport during the Civil War. February 1862, carried the 66th Illinois Infantry from St. Louis to Fort Henry, where the troops occupied the vacated fortifications. She spent most of March and the first week of April 1864, on a sand bar opposite Tiptonville, Tennessee. She was anchored at St. Louis, at the location of the east pier of the Eads Bridge, in the winter of 1865-1866, and test borings were made from her forecastle. She was at that time solidly frozen in ice, and was lost on 12 January 1866, when the ice gorged, the crew, including the captain and two pilots, getting ashore only with some difficulty. The wreck lodged near Duncan Island, where on 13 February 1867 it was struck by the steamer WHITE CLOUD NO. 2, which sank [ Frederick Way, Jr., Way's Packet Directory, 1848-1994; Passenger Steamboats of the Mississippi River System Since the Advent of Photography in Mid-Continent America (revised edition; Athens, Ohio: Ohio University Press, 1994) p. 319, packet #3897]. [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing list by Michael Palmer - 16 December 1997]


MENDOZA
See CASERTA.


MENES
The "The "Menes" was a cargo vessel built in 1926 by Bremer Vulkan, Vegesack. She was a 5,609 gross ton ship, length 438.6ft x beam 55.4ft, one funnel, two masts, single screw and a speed of 11 knots. She was built for Deutsche Dampf Kosmos in 1924 and was taken over the same year by Hamburg America Line, together with the rest of the companies vessels. In 1940 she became a Mediterranean transport and on December 3rd 1942 was sunk off the coast of Libya while en route to Crete. [Merchant Fleets by Duncan Haws, vol.4, Hamburg America Line] - [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 4 February 1998]


MENOMINEE
The "Menominee" was built by A.Stephen & Sons, Glasgow in 1897 as the "Alexandra" for Wilson's and Furness-Leyland. This was a 6,919 gross ton ship, length 475ft x beam 52.3ft, one funnel, four masts, single screw and a speed of 14 knots. There was accommodation for 120-1st class passengers. She commenced her maiden voyage on 8/10/1897 when she left Glasgow for New York and London and on 12/11/1897 commenced her first London - New York sailing. Her last voyage for this company started on 14/7/1898 from London to New York and she then went to the Atlantic Transport Line. She made one London (dep 18/8/1898)- NY voyage for this company under her old name and was then renamed "Menominee". She commenced sailing London - NY on 23/9/1898 and continued on this service until her last voyage started on 16/2/1905. In Sept.1905 she was chartered to Red Star Line and sailed between Antwerp and Philadelphia carrying up to 120-2nd class passengers. She made her last voyage on this service in July 1914 and on 18/8/1914 sailed between Antwerp, London (dep 5/9) and new York. On 28/10/1914 she went back to the London - New York service for ATL for three round voyages, the last starting on 21/1/1915 and then became a British Transport ship. Reconditioned in 1919 she sailed from Liverpool to New York with cargo only and then returned to the London - New York service. She was scrapped in Italy in 1926. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.3, p.1091] [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 25 November 1997]


MENTANA (1)
The "Mentana" was built as the "Westphalia" in 1868 by Caird & Co, Greenock, Scotland for the Hamburg America Line. She was 3158 gross tons, length 103,60m x beam 12,20m, two funnels [built with one funnel but later increased to two], two masts, iron construction, single screw and a speed of 12 knots. There was accommodation for 90-1st, 130-2nd and 520-3rd class passengers. Launched on 24/6/1868, she sailed on her first voyage from Hamburg to New York on 16/9/1868. In 1887 she was sold to Britain and became the "Atlantica" and in 1888 was sold to Gazzo & Schiaffino of Italy who renamed her "Provincia di Sao Paolo". In 1889, she was sold again to Fratelli Lavarello who renamed her "Mentana" and on 7/3/1889 she commenced running between Genoa and South America. In 1891 she went to the Italian company - La Veloce, who renamed her "Sud America" and used her from 14/1/1891 to run between Genoa and S.America. She was scrapped in Genoa in 1901. [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Ted Finch - 11 September 1997]


MENTANA (2)
See TEUTONIA (1)


MERCUR
See MARIANNE (1).


MERCURIUS
See GANGES .


MERCURY (1)
The MERCURY was a 3-masted, square-rigged ship, built by Westervelt & Mackey, New York, for Boyd & Hincken's Havre Second Line of pacekts between New York and Havre, and launched on 3 September 1851. 1,350/1,156 tons (old/new measurement); 193.6 x 38.10 x 22.2 feet (length x beam x depth of hold); 2 decks, draught 21 feet. She was the largest vessel in the Havre Second Line, and the fastest (she is often considered a "medium clipper"): in the 18 years (1851-1869) in which she sailed in the line, her westbound passages, from Havre to New York, averaged 33 days, her fastest passage being 23 days, her longest being 49 days [Robert Greenhalgh Albion, Square-riggers on Schedule; The New York Sailing Packets to England, France, and the Cotton Ports (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1938), pp. 286-287, 299; William Armstrong Fairburn, Merchant Sail (Center Lovell, Maine: Fairburn Marine Educational Foundation, [1945]55]), II.1176, 1190, 1198, 1199, 1201, 1202, 1206, 1226, 1271, 1292, 1301, 1304; V.2780, 2781, 2799, 2816; Carl C. Cutler, Queens of the Western Ocean; The Story of America's Mail and Passenger Sailing Lines (Annapolis: United States Naval Institute, c1961), p. 321]. I have no information on the MERCURY's history after 1869, or on her ultimate fate. However, it may be able to trace this history in the annual volumes of one or more of the following: 1. American Lloyd's Registry of American and Foreign Shipping (from 1858; begun in 1857 as the New York Marine Register), a "classification" society like Lloyd's and the Bureau Veritas. 2. American Shipmasters' Association (later American Bureau of Shipping), Record of American and Foreign Shipping (from 1867), also a "classification" society. 3. Merchant Vessels of the United States (from 1867), published originally by the Treasury Department, then, in turn, by the Bureau of Navigation, the Bureau of Marine Inspection and Navigation, and the Bureau of Customs. The best collection of these registers is held by the Mariners' Museum, 100 Museum Drive, Newport News, VA 23606-3798. [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 12 December 1997]


MERCURY(2)
See BARBAROSSA.


MERKARA
The MERKARA was a 1996 tons ship, Captain Sayers. Sailed from London on the 30th April 1889 and arrived at Brisbane on the 25th June 1889. Surgeon Superintendent Dr Kenneth Smith. Matron Mrs McKeddie. Additional info per John Snelson, I think she was an auxiliary steamship ... 2971 tons, built by William Denny of Dumbarton in 1875 for the British India Navigation Co ... she was an iron ship ... made an unbelievable 31 voyages from London to Queensland from 1881 to 1896 averaging 57 days ... quite remarkable ...see Rights of Passage by Woolcock. [Posted th The ShipsList by Fred Birkley - 15 November 1997]

The "Merkara" inaugurated a new regular mail service for British India Steam Nav.Co on 12th Feb.1881 when she left London for Naples, Suez, Colombo, Batavia, Cooktown, Townsville, Rockhampton and Brisbane where she arrived on 13th April. This service filled a gap left by other shipping companies which tended to concentrate on the Adelaide, Melbourne and Sydney routes. They ran a four weekly service with the "Merkara", "Roma", "Almora", "Chyebassa", and "Dorunda". All were barquentine rigged, single funneled vessels of between 2600 and 3000 tons with a service speed of around 10 knots. They also chartered the "Durham" until delivery of their new vessels "Compta" and "Camorta" in late 1881 enabled the company to operate the service with their own vessels. The "Merkara" made her last sailing in Oct.1896 and was broken up in 1901. [North Star to Southern Cross, The story of the Australasian Seaways by John M.Maber] [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 16 November 1997]

I can't find a photo of this ship, only a silhouette line drawing in Merchant Fleets, vol.11, British India S.N.Co by Duncan Haws. The "Merkara" was the first of three ships with this name owned by the British India Steam Navigation Co. Built by Wm.Denny in 1875, together withher sister ship "Dorunda", she was a 2,971 gross ton ship, length 368.2ft x beam 37.2ft x depth 28.5ft, one funnel, three masts (barquentine rigged for sail), iron construction, single screw and a speed of 11 knots. There was accommodation for 237 passengers. Launched on 7/7/1875, she started her first London - Australia voyage on 12th February 1881. She arrived at Brisbane on 13th April after calls at Cooktown, Townsville and Rockhampton. Her final Australia sailing commenced 19th October 1896 and she was then used on various routes until 1901, when she was broken up at Bombay. (It is recorded by the builders that she had pens for 1 cow, 10 sheep and a fowl coop for live produce consumption during the voyage) [Merchant Fleets, vol.11, British India S.N.Co by Duncan Haws] A couple of books worth trying for photos are - B.I.Centenary 1856-1956 by G.Blake. or BI - British India Steam Navigation Company Ltd by W.A.Laxon. - [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 11 June 1998]


MESSICO
See ETNA.


METAGAMA
The "Metagama" was built by Barclay Curle & Co Ltd, Glasgow in 1914 for Canadian Pacific Line. She was a 12,420 gross ton ship, length 500.4ft x beam 64.2ft, two funnels, two masts, twin screw and a speed of 15 knots. There was accommodation for 520-cabin and 1,200-3rd class passengers. Launched on 19/11/1914, she sailed from Liverpool on her maiden voyage to St John, NB on 26/3/1915. She started her first voyage after the Armistice on 20/11/1918 when she left Liverpool for St John,NB. On 9/3/1922 she started Glasgow - St John,NB sailings and on 26/5/1923 collided with the British Hogarth Line steamer "Baron Vernon" in the Clyde. On 19/6/1924 she collided with the Italian ship "Clara Camus" off Cape Race and on 1/3/1927 commenced Antwerp - Southampton - St John, NB sailings. In October 1927 she was converted to 1st, tourist and 3rd class accommodation and on 13/8/1930 commenced the last of 151 North Atlantic round voyages when she left Antwerp for Southampton, Quebec and Montreal. From 1931-1934 she was laid up at Southend and on 3/4/1934 was sold to P & W. McLennan Ltd and broken up at Bo'ness, Firth of Forth. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.3, p.1311] [Canadian Pacific - 100 years by George Musk] - [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 14 March 1998]


METAPEDIA
See MONTCLARE.


METEORO
See HAVEL.


MICHIGAN (1)
See SURREY .


MICHIGAN (2) See WASHINGTON (4).


MIDNIGHT SUN
See GENERAL WERDER.


MILANO
See ITALIA (2).


MILWAUKEE
The ship MILWAUKIE, or MILWAUKEE, as the name is usually (although not invariably) spelled, 738 tons, built at Yarmouth, Maine, in 1853. She was originally registered at New Haven, Connecticut, and was registered at New York on 16 June 1858 [Forrest R. Holdcamper, comp.,List of American-flag Merchant Vessels that received Certificates of Enrollment or Registry at the Port of New York, 1789-1867 (Record Groups 41 and 36), National Archives Publication 68-10, Special Lists 22 (Washington, DC: National Archives and Records Service, 1968), p. 481]. I know very little about the vessel's career, except that in 1854, H. S. Soule, master, she made two voyages from Havre to New York carrying German immigrants, and in the same year she was advertised as running in the Merchants' Line of coastal packets between New York and New Orleans [Germans to America, vol. 6, 453-455, and vol. 8, pp. 336-338; Carl C. Cutler, Queens of the Western Ocean; The Story of America's Mail and Passenger Sailing Lines (Annapolis: United States Naval Institute, c1961), p. 509]. - [Posted to the Emigration-ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 12 July 1998]


MILWAUKIE
See MILWAUKEE.


MINDON
Mentioned in the book The Blackwall Frigates by Basil Dubbock she is spelled there as "Minden." Built by Sunderland in1848 as one of the Blackwall Frigates. She was 916 tons and owned by Dunbar. On one trip to Australia she left Liverpool bound for Melbourne under Captain John Gover on 22nd April 1856. On the Passenger List her name is spelled "Mindon"and she was cited as being 1277 tons. She was approved for 286 Statute Adults for 140 days. She arrived in Port Phillip (Melbourne) on 14 July 1856. On board were 116 English adults, 71 children and 3 infant passengers; 5 Scotch adults; 163 Irish adults 4 children and 4 infant passengers and 50 other adults (plus 2 "other" children) . In total there were 27 married men, 41 married women; 178 single men, 71 single women; 13 male children, 14 female children; and 7 infants. One death occurred on 9th July 1856 - Amelia SIDELLE? of 27 (their surname might be GIDELLE) married to Elias (23). - {Email from John Parker, Perth, Western Australia - 11 August 1998]


MINIEH
See ALSATIA (2).


MINNEDOSA
The "Minnedosa" was ordered by the Hamburg America Line in 1913, but was taken over by Canadian Pacific before completion. She was built by Barclay, Curle & Co Lts, Glasgow (engines by Harland & Wolff, Belfast)and was a 13,972 gross ton vessel, length 520ft x beam 67.2ft, two funnels, two masts, triple screw and a speed of 15 knots. There was accommodation for 550-cabin and 1,200-3rd class passengers. Although her keel was laid in 1913, she was not launched until 17/10/1917 and on 2/5/1918 was towed to Belfast to have her engines fitted. On 5/12/1918 she commenced her maiden voyage from Liverpool to St John, NB and on 13/12/1919 started a single round voyage from the UK to Bombay for the British government. On 21/6/1922 she commenced her first voyage from Antwerp to Southampton, Quebec and Montreal and in 1925 was refitted by Hawthorn, Leslie & Co Ltd, Hebburn-on-Tyne and her tonnage increased to 15,186 tons. In June 1926 she had accommodation for 206-cabin, 545-tourist and 590-3rd class passengers. She commenced her last Antwerp - Southampton - St John NB - Liverpool voyage on 30/3/1927 and was transferred to the Liverpool - Quebec - Montreal route on 29/4/1927. On 27/6/1931 she started her last transatlantic crossing from Glasgow to Quebec and Montreal (129 Atlantic round voyages) and was then laid up in the River Clyde. In April 1935 she was sold for scrapping and was towed to Savona, Italy, but was bought by Italia Line, renamed "Piemonte" and used as a troopship. On 15/8/1943 she was scuttled at Messina, salvaged in 1949 and towed to Spezia and scrapped. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.3,p.1314] - [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 16 February 1998]


MINNEHAHA
The "Minnehaha" was built by Harland & Wolff, Belfast in 1900 for the Atlantic Transport Line. She was a 13,443 gross ton ship, length 600.7ft x beam 65.5ft, one funnel, four masts, twin screw and a speed of 16 knots. There was accommodation for 250-1st class passengers. Launched on 31/3/1900, she sailed on her maiden voyage from Belfast to New York and London on 7/7/1900. On 12/8/1900 she commenced her first voyage from London to New York and on 18/4/1910 stranded on the Scilly Isles, was refloated and repaired at Southampton. On 27/10/1910 she resumed the London - New York service and was torpedoed and sunk on 7/9/1917 by the German submarine U.48, 12 miles from Fastnet with the loss of 43 lives. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.3,p.1091] [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 10 November 1997]


MINNEKAHDA
The "Minnekahda" was built by Harland & Wolff, Belfast as a cargo steamer for the Atlantic Transport Line. She was a 17,221 gross ton ship, length 620.5ft x beam 66.4ft, one funnel, one mast, triple screw and a speed of 15 knots. The order was placed with the shipbuilders in April 1913, but due to the war, she was not launched until 8/3/1917, and then served as a British troopship. She commenced her last trooping voyage from London to Halifax and New York on 16/1/1920 and commenced London - New York voyages as an Atlantic Transport Line cargo ship on 27/3/1920. On 17/7/1920 she started a single round voyage on charter to the American Line between New York - London - Hamburg - New York and on 8/10/1920 commenced her last London - New York voyage as a cargo ship. Later the same year she was rebuilt to 17,281 gross tons and with accommodation for 2,150-3rd class passengers. She was chartered to the American Line and started a single round voyage between New York - Naples - Hamburg - New York on 31/3/1921. On 21/5/1921 she commenced New York - Hamburg - New York sailings and in 1923 was transferred to the US flag. She started her last Hamburg - New York crossing on 10/1/1925 and on 24/3/1925 commenced London - New York sailings for the Atlantic Transport Line. Her final voyage started on 5/9/1931 when she sailed from London for Boulogne and New York and she was then laid up at New York. On 14/4/1936 she sailed under the British flag from New York for Scotland, and was scrapped at Dalmuir. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.3, p.1095-6] - [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 16 March 1998]


MINNESOTA (1)
The steamship MINNESOTA was built by Palmer Bros & Co, Jarrow-on-Tyne, for the Liverpool & Great Western Steamship Co Ltd (familiarly known as the Guion Line), and launched in February 1867. 3,008 tons; 102,22 x 12,95 meters/335.4 x 42.5 feet (length x breadth); clipper bow, 1 funnel, 2 masts; iron construction, screw propulsion, service speed 10 knots; accommodation for 72 passengers in 1st class and 800 in steerage. 14 April 1867, maiden voyage, Liverpool-Queenstown-New York. 18 November 1874, last voyage Liverpool-Queenstown-New York. 10 February 1875, 1 roundtrip voyage, Liverpool-Philadelphia, chartered to the American Line. 1875, sold to the Warren Line; compound engines by J. Jack Rollo & Co, Liverpool. 19 August 1876, first voyage, Liverpool-Boston. 1882, VINUELAS (Spanish). 1886, SAN IGNACIO DE LOYOLA (Cia Trasatlantica). 1908, scrapped [Noel Reginald Pixell Bonsor, North Atlantic Seaway; An Illustrated History of the Passenger Services Linking the Old World with the New (2nd ed.; Jersey, Channel Islands: Brookside Publications), vol. 2 (1978), p. 708. Pictured in Michael J. Anuta, Ships of Our Ancestors (Menominee, MI: Ships of Our Ancestors, 1983), p. 201, coutesy of the Peabody Essex Museum, East India Square, Salem, MA 01970. [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 9 January 1998]


MINNESOTA (2)
See ZEELAND (2).


MINNIE J. DICKS
MINNIE J. DICKS ~ official number 085737 ~ Schooner ~ 2 masts ~ GTon 108.5, NTon 105.5, RTon 77.8 ~ length 82ft, width 23.8 ft, draft 9.5ft. Built 1883 by Titus Langille in Mahone Bay, NS. ~ Reg: Sydney ~ Cargo: Gas and butter Owner: Margaret Dicks 1919-12-01 ~ Stranded from anchor, broke up, at Ile Vainqueurs, St. Pierre east, St. Pierre (Nfld) Notes: poss. December 2nd Prev. SCYILLA Prev reg: Halifax (1905-14), Sydney (1914) aka. Minnie Dicks Owned at: North Sydney. 5 bodies came ashore. [Carte des Naufrages Iles St. Pierre et Miquelon by Institute Geographique National - 1975? (France)~Shipwreck Chart of St Pierre and Miquelon. Shipwreck of St. Pierre by Jean-Pierre Andrieux pub. W.P. Rannie 1982 ,W.P. Rannie, P.O. Box 700, Beamsville, Ont. L0R 1B0] - Posted to The ShipsList by Sue Swiggum - 28 May 1998]


MINONA
Here is the information I have gleaned on the MINONA: From Wendy Schnur, Reference Assistant at the G. W. Blunt White Library, Mystic Seaport, Mystic, Connecticut:
"According to American Lloyd's, MINONA was a Swedish bark of 251 tons, built of oak and fir in 1820 in Gottenburg (also spelled Goteborg or Gothenburg). In 1857 she measured 104' x 23' x 11 1/2' and had a draft of 13'. She was lengthened and rebuilt in 1856 and rerigged from her original brig rig (2 masts, square-rigged) to a bark (3 masts, square-rigged on the fore and main, and fore-and-aft-rigged on the mizzen)."
"The Boston Shipping List for July 4, 1857, states that MINONA arrived on July 1, with Rydin as master. Her cargo was 210 tons of iron."
And from the Boston Daily Advertiser, No. 13, 428, Vol. 90, No. 3, Friday morning, July 3, 1857: "A Hardy Craft--The Swedish barque Minona, which arrived here on Wednesday, consigned to Messrs. Naylor & Co., was formerly a brig; but has been recently made longer, and rigged as a barque. Her keel was laid upwards of one hundred years ago, and her frame was constructed of teak wood; the strongest and most durable wood used in ship-building. She seems to contradict the theory that vessels become worthless in a quarter of a century or so, from decay, or must succumb to the perils of the sea before the lapse of many years. If not properly taken care of, this might have been the fate of the Minona; but many parts of her have been altered and renewed from time to time, that not much of the original brig, besides the frame, remains." - [E-mail from Jeanne Nelson - 30 May 1998]

According to Stockholm's Sj?historiska Museet, "the Minona was built 1781 in Halmstad, Sweden as the Therese Charlotte." In an "unknown year it was named Fredrik and after that got the name Neptunus. The Minona was shipwrecked in 28.12 1879 near the place Goodwill Sands, river Thames, England." - [E-mail from J. Nelson - 12 July 1998]


MINSK
See HEKLA.


MIRAMAR
See SCHIEDAM .


MISSOURI (1)
(of 1873) See HAMMONIA (1).


MISSOURI (2)
The "Missouri" was built by C.Connell & Co, Glasgow(Engines by J&J.Thomson, Glasgow) in 1881 for the Warren Line of Liverpool. She was a 5,146 gross ton ship, length 425.6ft x beam 43.6ft, one funnel, four masts, iron construction, single screw and a speed of 11 knots. I have no information on her passenger capacity. Launched on 15/2/1881, she sailed from Liverpool on her maiden voyage to Boston on 30/5/1881. On 1/3/1886 she was wrecked in Caernarvon Bay, Wales with no loss of life. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.2, p.685] - [Posted to the ShipsList by Ted Finch - 22 February 1998]


MITAU
See ARUNDEL CASTLE (1).


MOANA
The "Moana" was built by Wm.Denny, Dumbarton in 1897 for the Union SS Co of New Zealand, she was a 3,915 gross ton ship, twin screws and a speed of 15 knots. She had accommodation for 198-1st and 100-2nd class passengers. She sailed between Sydney, Auckland, Honolulu and San Francisco until 1900 when the Hawaiian Islands were annexed by the USA, thus bringing the San Francisco to Honolulu trade into the 'domestic' category which prohibited the carriage of passengers and cargo between American ports in other than US registered ships. The "Moana" arrived in Sydney from San Francisco for the last time on 28th October 1900. In 1901 she commenced sailings between Sydney, Brisbane, Honolulu and Vancouver for Huddart, Parker's Canadian-Australasian Line. In Dec.1903 she stranded on rocks near Victoria BC, refloated and given temporary repairs at Victoria, she was then given a complete overhaul. She continued regular voyages to Vancouver until 1908 when she was transferred to the Inter-Colonial service, although she did an occasional relief voyage to Vancouver as required. Her last sailing from Vancouver took place on 24th March 1911 and in 1912 she entered the Sydney - Wellington - Raratonga - Tahiti - San Francisco service until 1920 when she transferred to the Tasman Sea service. In 1927 she was sold to the Otago Harbour Board for use as a breakwater. [North Star to Southern Cross by John M.Maber] - [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 5 July 1998]


MOBILE (1)
According to the New Orleans Daily Picayune, the ship MOBILE, Tarbox, master, arrived at New Orleans on Saturday, 29 May 1852, 52 days from Havre, with 371 steerage passengers, to the master. (Because the vessel arrived on Saturday, the passenger manifest is not dated until Monday, 31 May 1852, the earliest day the master could present it to the U.S. Customs officials at New Orleans.). The only information I have on this vessel at present is that she was a 3-masted, square-rigged ship, built at Bath, Maine, in 1851, for the firm of John & George F. Patten: 960 tons, 172.8 x 34.8 x 17.4 feet (length x beam x depth of hold) [William Armstrong Fairburn, Merchant Sail (Center Lovell, Maine: Fairburn Marine Educational Foundation, [1945-1955]), vol. 5, pp. 3199, 3205, and 3207].- [Posted to The Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 28 September 1998]


MOBILE (2)
The MOBILE was a 3-masted, square-rigged ship, 1290 Lasten/1856 tons. According to Johannes Lachs, Schiffe aus Bremen; Bilder und Modelle im Focke-Museum (Bremen: H. M. Hauschild, [1994]), p. 137, she was built in Portsmouth, New Hampshire, and launched in 1855 as the TWING. However, I can find no reference to her in William Armstrong Fairburn, Merchant Sail (6 vols.; Center Lovell, Maine: Fairburn Marine Educational Foundation, [1945-55]), the standard work on 19th-century U.S. sailing vessels, and since Lachs's account of her contains at least one proven inaccuracy it is possible that he misspelled the name. According to Lachs, on one of her earliest voyages, the TWING stranded off Goteborg, Sweden. In 1856, she was purchased for 88,000 Taler by the Bremen firm of D. H. Watjen, who renamed her MOBILE, and placed her in the North American trade. The MOBILE became at the time of her purchase the largest sailing vessel in the Bremen merchant fleet. She was destroyed by fire at Mobile, Alabama, in January 1867 (not, as Lachs prints, 1866). The following is an account of her destruction, printed in the New York Herald for 28 January 1867, and taken in turn from the Mobile Advertiser of 19 January 1867: At about 12 o'clock on Thursday night last [17/18 January 1867] flames were discovered issuing from the fore hatch of the Bremen ship MOBILE, then at anchor in the lower bay, some 30 miles below the city. Capt. Lee, of the steamer JACKSON, was alongside of the ship PROGRESS, with a load of cotton, and as soon as he was informed of the fire immediately cast off and stood for the burning ship. The wind was blowing fresh from the north at the time, and it was impossible for Capt. Lee to get to leeward of the MOBILE without running great risk of losing his own boat and cargo, but he took his vessel to windward and ahead of the MOBILE, and made a successful effort to bring a stream of water from the pumps of his steamer to bear upon the fire; a hawser was got out from the bow of the M[OBILE] to the JACKSON, up which Mr. Jessup, of the latter vessel, gallantly made his way and led the hose from the steamer to the fore hatch of the ship. The flames had made such headway, however, that the intense heat prevented anything more being done than lying by to pick up any one who might chance be compelled to jump overboard. Fortunately for the mate and the three men who had so courageously remained at their posts, the boats of the Br[itish] ship TUDOR, under charge of Capt. Wherland, pulled under the counter of the burning ship and rescued them from their dangerous position. With the exception of the ship's chronometer and two quadrants the captain and officers lost all their clothing and personal effects saving only the clothes they stood in. The M[OBILE] was a vessel of abut 5,000 bales capacity, and an excellent ship in every particular. She was owned in Bremen and sailed under that flag, but was American built, being one of the numerous vessels placed under foreign colors during the war. She was under charter for Liverpool and was about half loaded, having 2,350 bales of cotton aboard. Rumor has it that the ship was fuly insured, and we understand from a gentleman in a position to know that the cotton is fully covered by the policies of foreign offices. The fire was undoubtedly the work of an incendiary, as no smoking is ever allowed in the 'tween decks of a vessel loading with cotton. There is as yet no suspicion as to who the scoundrel is that could thus peril so many lives and destroy so much property. For additional information on the MOBILE, see the following works: (1) Otto Hover, Von der Galiot zum Funfmaster; Unsere Segelschiffe (Bremen 1934), pp. 277f. (2). Rolf Reinemuth, Segel aus Downeast (Herford 1971), p. 40. (3) Hans Watjen, Weisses W im blauen Feld (Wolfsburg 1983), pp. 116f. - [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing list by Michael Palmer - 17 Feb 1998]


MOBILE (3)
See CLEVELAND (2) .


MOCAMBIQUE
See SICILIAN PRINCE.


MODASA
The "Modasa" was one of a class of six near-sister ships owned by British India Steam Navigation Co. Built by Swan Hunter & Wigham Richardson, Wallsend-on-Tyne, she was a 9,070 gross ton ship, length 465.2ft x beam 58.3ft x depth 32.6ft, one funnel, two masts, twin screw and a speed of 13.5 knots. There was accommodation for 127-1st and 41-2nd class passengers. Launched on 24th December 1920, she entered service in December 1921 on the UK to India or East Africa service and in 1927 carried the first large export cargo of maize from East Africa to London. In 1933 she arrived at Middlesborough to discharge her cargo before proceeding to London for repairs. She had 450 tons of oil in her tanks and Customs ruled that, as this constituted a coastal voyage, this oil was liable to customs duty. The row was only settled by taking the ship to Antwerp for repairs, this being classed as a non-coastal voyage. Between 1939 and 1945 she was employed on both commercial and government service and was refurbished in 1946 to carry 183 single class passengers. She then resumed the East Africa service until being sold for scrap in December 1953. On January 23rd 1954, after unloading her cargo at the Tyne, she proceeded to Blyth where she was scrapped. [Merchant Fleets by Duncan Haws, vol.11, British India S.N.Co] A typical voyage for 1953 was - 3rd June Sail London, 15-16 June call Port Said, 19-20th June call Port Sudan, 23rd June call Aden, 30th June - 6th July call Mombasa, 7th July call Tanga, 8th July call Zanzibar, 9th - 12th July call Dar-es-Salaam, 14th - 16th July call Lindi, 20th - 23rd July call Beira, 28th - 30th July call Dar-es-Salaam, 31st July call Zanzibar, 1st - 2nd August call Tanga, 3rd - 8th Aug. call Mombasa, 14th Aug. call Aden, 17th - 18th Aug. call Port Sudan, 21st - 22nd Aug. call Port Said, 28th - 30th Aug. call Marseilles, 1st Sept. call Gibraltar, 7th Sept. arrive London. [Sea Safari, British India S.N.Co African Ships and Services by Peter C. Kohler] - [Posred to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 27 July 1998]


MOLTKE
The "Moltke" was built by Blohm & Voss, Hamburg in 1901 for the Hamburg America Line. Her details were 12,335 gross tons, length 525.6ft x beam 62.3ft, two funnels, two masts, twin screw and a speed of 16 knots. There was accommodation for 390-1st, 230-2nd and 550-3rd class passengers. Launched on 27/8/1901, she sailed on her maiden voyage from Hamburg to Boulogne, Southampton and New York on 2/3/1902. On 3/4/1906 she commenced her first sailing between Naples, Genoa and New York and her last voyage, Genoa - Naples - New York - Genoa on 23/6/1914. She was interned at Genoa in 1914 and on 25/5/1915 she was seized by Italy and renamed "Pesaro". She commenced her first voyage for the Italian company, Lloyd Sabaudo, on 23/4/1919 when she sailed from Genoa for Marseilles and New York. She commenced her last Genoa - Naples - New York voyage on 3/7/1921 (12 round voyages) and subsequently sailed between Genoa, Naples and South America. She was scrapped in 1925 in Italy. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.1,p.407] [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Ted Finch - 25 November 1997]


MONARCH OF BERMUDA
Bult by Vickers-Armstrong Shipbuilders Ltd, Walker-on-Tyne (ship order #1) (engines by Fraser & Chalmers, Erich (turbines), and by General Electric Co Ltd, Birmingham (motors)), for Furness, Withy & Co's New York-Bermuda service, and launched on 17 March 1931. 22,424 gross tons; 579 x 76 feet (length x breadth), 3 funnels, 2 masts, cruiser stern; steam turboelectric engines, quadruple screw, service speed 19 knots; acccommodation for 799 passengers in 1st class, 31 in 2nd class; crew of 456. 1931-1939, New York-Bermuda. November 1939-1946, troopship. 24 May 1947, burned out at Hebburn-on-Tyne while being reconditioned for return to passenger service. Although declared a total loss, the wreck was reappraised and then purchased by the Ministry of Transport, who had her rebuilt by Thornycroft in Southampton as an emigrant ship; 20,256 tons; 553.2 x 76.7 feet; 1 funnel; 1600 passengers in one class. 1949, renamed NEW AUSTRALIA. 15 August 1950, first voyage, Southampton-Sydney, managed by the Shaw Savill Line. January 1958, sold to the Greek Line, and renamed ARKADIA (registered in the name of the Arcadia Steamship Co); rebuilt and modernized by Blohm & Voss, Hamburg; 20,259 tons; forpeak extended to provide a curved stem, length 590 feet; foremast replaced by two king-posts; 150 passengers in 1st class, 1150 in tourist class. 22 May 1968, first voyage, Bremerhaven-Cherbourg-Liverpool-Greenock- Quebec-Montreal. 17 June 1958, first voyage, Bremerhaven-Southampton- Cherbourg-Cobh-Quebec-Montreal. 1961, further refitting by Blohm & Voss, Hamburg; 20,648 tons; 50 passengers in 1st class, 1337 in tourist class. 16 August 1966, last voyage, Bremerhaven-Amsterdam-London-Havre-Cobh-Quebec-Montreal (departed 26 August). November 1966, laid up in River Fal. 18 December 1966, arrived at Valencia, Spain, for scrapping [Noel Reginald Pixell Bonsor, North Atlantic Seaway; An Illustrated History of the Passenger Services Linking the Old World with the New (2nd ed.; Jersey, Channel Islands: Brookside Publications), vol. 4 (1979), pp. 1652-1653 and 1657 (photograph as ARKADIA); Arnold Kludas, Die grossen Passagierschiffe der Welt; Eine Dokumentation, Bd. 3: 1924-1935 (Oldenburg/Hamburg: Gerhard Stalling, c1973),. pp. 180 - 181(photographs)]. - [E-mail from Michael Palmer - 9 June 1998]


MONGOLIA
See RIMUTAKA (3) .


MONGOLIAN
Steamship MONGOLIAN, built for the Allan Line by D & W Henderson Ltd, Glasgow, and launched on 13 November 1890. 4,838 tons; 121,91 x 13,77 meters (400 x 45.2 feet, length x beam); straight bow, 1 funnel, 2 masts; steel construction, screw propulsion, service speed 13 knots; accommodation for 100 1st-, 80 2nd-, and 1,000 3rd-class passengers. 12 February 1891, maiden voyage, Liverpool-Halifax-Portland. 23 April 1891, first voyage, Liverpool-Quebec-Montreal. 14 May 1897, first voyage, Glasgow-New York. 1900, Boer War transport. 13 April 1905, last voyage, Glasgow-Liverpool-Halifax-New York. 20 May 1905, first voyage, Glasgow-Quebec-Montreal. December 1907, first voyage, Glasgow-St. John's, Newfoundland- Philadelphia. 30 December 1914, last voyage, Glasgow-St.John, New Brunswick-Halifax-Glasgow. 1915, sold to the British Admiralty. 21 July 1918, torpedoed and sunk near Filey Brig, Yorkshire (36 lives lost) [Noel Reginald Pixell Bonsor, North Atlantic Seaway; An Illustrated History of the Passenger Services Linking the Old World with the New (2nd ed.; Jersey, Channel Islands: Brookside Publications), vol. 1 (1975),p. 317]. Pictured in Michael J. Anuta, Ships of Our Ancestors (Menominee, MI: Ships of Our Ancestors, 1983),p. 206, courtesy of the Peabody Essex Museum. Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 16 September 1997]


MONMOUTH
The "Monmouth" was built by Sir Raylton Dixon & Co, Middlesborough in 1900 for Elder Dempster Line. She was a 4,078 gross ton ship, one funnel, two masts, single screw and a speed of 11 knots. Launched on 1/5/1900, she commenced her maiden voyage from the Tyne to Montreal and Avonmouth on 25/7/1900. On 2/9/1900 she commenced her first voyage from Avonmouth to New Orleans and on 4/12/1900 started her first voyage as a Boer War troop transport from Fiume to Capetown. She made six voyages from Fiume or New Orleans on this service and on 9/10/1902 resumed the Tyne - Montreal - Avonmouth route. On 29/11/1902 she resumed the Avonmouth - New Orleans run and in 1903 was bought by Canadian Pacific and ran between London or Bristol and Canada. On 16/11/1916 she struck a mine off Cherbourg but was towed in. After repair she sailed from Liverpool on 27/9/1917 to Murmansk and Archangel and on 31/12/1919 was sold to Imperial Oil Co. of Toronto. In 1922 she went to Stillmar, Sarnia, Ontario, and in 1923 was sold to Kishimoto KK, Japan and in 1925 was renamed "Shinzan Maru". In 1929 she was sold again, to Dalgosrybtrest, Vladivostok, Russia and renamed "Treti Krabolov". She was no longer registered in 1960. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.3,p.1308] [Canadian Pacific, 100 years by George Musk] [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 18 November 1997]


MONTANA (1)
See TEUTONIA (1)


MONTANA (2)
Built in 1872 by Palmer Bros & Co, Jarrow-on-Tyne for the Guion Line of Livepool, this was a 4,321 gross ton ship, length 400.4ft x beam 43.7ft, straighr stem, one funnel, two masts (rigged for sail), iron construction, single screw and a speed of 11 knots. There was passenger accommodation for 60-1st, 90-intermediate and 900-3rd class. Launched on 14th Nov.1872, but on the delivery voyage from the Tyne to Liverpool, five of her boilers were put out of action by tube blow-outs and the ship put in at Portsmouth for temporary repairs. Upon arrival at Liverpool, the Board of Trade inspector refused to pass her until she had undertaken a six day trial; during which she encountered further trouble. The boilers were replaced and the ship didn't sail on her maiden voyage from Liverpool for New York until 17th Jun.1874, but returned to Liverpool on 21st June with further engine trouble. Eventually she sailed again on 7th July 1875, almost two years behind schedule. She continued Liverpool - Queenstown - New York sailings until 14th Mar.1880 when she stranded on Anglesey, North Wales, was refloated and scrapped at Sunderland the same year. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P. Bonsor, vol.2, p.702-709] - [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 17 October 1998]


MONTCALM
The "Montcalm" was the third ship with that name and was owned by Canadian Pacific Steamships Ltd. She was built in 1920 by John Brown & Co, Glasgow and was a 16,418 gross ton ship, length 549.5ft x beam 70.2ft, two funnels, two masts, twin screw and a speed of 16 knots. There was accommodation for 542-cabin class and 1,268-3rd class passengers. Launched on 3/7/1920, she sailed from Liverpool on her maiden voyage to St John NB on 17/1/1922 and rescued the crew of the Norwegian steamer "Mod" during this crossing. On 21/4/1922 she commenced her first Liverpool - Quebec - Montreal voyage and in 1927 was converted to cabin, tourist and 3rd class. On 3/7/1927 she collided with an iceberg in the Belle Isle Straits but received only superficial damage. She commenced her first Southampton - Cherbourg - St John NB voyage on 16/3/1929 and her first Antwerp - Southampton - Cherbourg - St John NB voyage on 12/4/1929. On 14/5/1929 she started her first Hamburg - Southampton - Cherbourg - Quebec - Montreal crossing and commenced the last voyage on this service on 28/4/1932 (15 round voyages). On 31/1/1930 she resumed Liverpool - Canada voyages (10 round voyages) and between 1932 - 1939 made 48 pleasure cruises as well as North Atlantic crossings from Antwerp, Southampton or Liverpool. On 12/3/1932 she rescued 27 men and the captain's dog from the rescue tug "Reindeer" in heavy seas off Halifax. In April 1939 she was converted to cabin and 3rd class only and commenced her last voyage from Southampton to Cherbourg and St John NB on 8/4/1939 (163 N.Atlantic crossings) On 17/10/1939 she was requisitioned and converted to an Armed Merchant Cruiser, renamed HMS Wolfe and one one occasion received two direct hits during a bombing raid. One bomb hit a ventilator and rebounded into the sea and the second one failed to explode and was hove over the side. In January 1942 she sailed to Canada and then Baltimore for conversion to a submarine depot ship, but on 22/5/1942 she was sold to the British Admiralty and in January 1943 converted to a destroyer depot ship. Laid up in 1950, she was towed to the Clyde in 1952 and scrapped at Faslane. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.3, p.1316] [Canadian Pacific 100 Years by George Musk] - [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 22 February 1998]


MONTCLARE
Gibbs, Passenger Liners of the Western Ocean reports; S.S.Montclare was built at Clyde, Brown shipyard, years of service 1922-1942...16,400 tons, 549 x 70..2 funnels, 2 masts, GT-2 engines, 16 knots....540 cabin, 1270 steerage, sailed from Liverpool until 1928 and then Southampton, re-engineered 1929-31 and commissioned as liner-cruiser in 1939...converted to destroyer depot ship in 1944, sold 1955. Posted to The ShipsList by Paul Petersen - 11 October 1997]

The "Montclare" was built by John Brown & Co.Ltd, Glasgow in 1922 for Canadian Pacific Steamships Ltd. She was a 16,314 gross ton vessel, length 549.5ft x beam 70.2ft, two funnels, two masts, twin screw and a speed of 16 knots. There was accommodation for 542-cabin class and 1,268-3rd class passengers. She was laid down as the "Metapedia" but launched on 18/12/1921 as the "Montclare". On 18/8/1922 she left Liverpool on her maiden voyage to Quebec and Montreal. In 1928, her accommodation was altered to cabin, tourist and 3rd class and her engines rebuilt in 1929. On 22/3/1929 she commenced an Antwerp - Southampton - St.John NB. Service and on 17/4/1929 an Antwerp - Southampton - Quebec - Montreal service. On 20/3/1930 she made her first voyage Hamburg - Southampton - Cherbourg - St John NB. and commenced her last voyage Hamburg - Southampton - Cherbourg - Quebec - Montreal on 9/11/1933. Between 1932 - 1939 she carried out 48 pleasure cruises, but some N.Atlantic voyages from Hamburg, Antwerp, Southampton or Liverpool. In Jan.1939 she was rebuilt to carry cabin and 3rd class only and commenced her last N.Atlantic voyage on 21/7/1939 fom Liverpool to Greenock, Belfast, Quebec, Montreal and Liverpool. On 28/8/1939 she was converted to an Armed Merchant Cruiser and named HMS Montclare and on 2/6/1942 was sold to the British Admiralty. In 1946 she was used as a submarine depot ship, and in 1954 was towed to Gareloch. In 1955 she was towed to Portsmouth and in Jan.1958 was sold and scrapped at Inverkeithing. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor - Vol.3,p.1317] Posted to The ShipsList byTed Finch - 12 October 1997]


MONTEAGLE
MONTEAGLE. Built by Palmers Shipbuilding, Jarrow in 1898. 5498 gross tons, length 445ft x beam 52.2ft, one funnel, four masts, iron built, twin screw and a speed of 13 knots. Launched on 13/12/1898 she left the Tyne for New Orleans on her maiden voyage on 4/3/1899. On 13/5/1899 she started on the Avonmouth - Montreal service and did six round voyages and on 2/12/1899 did one trip Liverpool - St John NB. 2/2/1900 she started one voyage Liverpool - Capetown as a Boer War transport and then did two round voyages London - Montreal commencing 4/8/1900. In Dec.1900 she started her first of two voyages New Orleans - Capetown, and in June 1901 resumed the Avonmouth - Montreal service for four round trips. Commencing Dec.1901 she did two trips Fiume - Capetown and on 24/5/1902 resumed the Avonmouth - Montreal service for three voyages. In 1903, she was taken over by Canadian Pacific and did her first run for this company, Bristol Channel - Montreal, arriving on 30.5.1903. In 1904 she was refitted at Liverpool with 97 cabin class berths and in March 1906 she sailed for Hong Kong via the Cape of Good Hope and was used on the transpacific service to Vancouver. In Sept.1914 she was requisitioned as a troopship and returned to the Pacific in Feb.1915. Between Nov.1918 and May 1919 she repatriated prisoners of war to Vladivostok and in 1921, rescued the crew of the "Hsin Tien" off the China coast. On 22/9/1922 she left Vancouver for Montreal and on 17/11/1922 left Montreal for Avonmouth. Arrived London 29/1/1923 and laid up. Renamed "Belton" and sold to Hughes Bolckow Shipbreaking Co. and arrived Blyth on 27/4/1926 for scrapping. [Canadian Pacific - G.Musk p242] [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Ted Finch]


MONTEBELLO
The "Montebello" was built in 1890 by Richardson Duck, Stockton for the Wilson Line of Hull. These ships were North Sea and Baltic traders. The "Montebello" was a 1,735 gross ton ship, length 276ft x beam 35ft. Sold on 28.6.1910 to Comp. Valenciana, Spain and renamed "Barcelo". Sold for scrapping in 1929. [The Wilson Line 1831-1981 by A.G.Credland & M.Thompson] [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 2 December 1997]


MONTEITH
See PRINZ FRIEDRICH WILHELM.


MONTEREY (1)
MONTEREY. Built 1897 by Palmer's & Co Ltd, Jarrow for Elder Dempster's Beaver Line. 5455 gross tons, length 445ft x beam 52ft, one funnel, four masts, single screw and a speed of 12 knots. Built as a cargo vessel with accommdation for 14-1st class passengers. Launched 25/11/1897 and made her maiden voyage from the Tyne - Montreal - Avonmouth commencing 25/5/1898. In June of that year she transferred to the Avonmouth - Quebec - Montreal run and on 16/3/1900 did a single voyage from Halifax to Capetown as a war transport. On 22/5/1900 transferred to the New Orleans - Capetown service for seven voyages and in 1903 was taken over by Canadian Pacific and arrived 4/7/1903 at Montreal from Bristol and on 1`4/7/1903 was wrecked on Plata Point, Little Miquelon. [Canadian Pacific - 100 years. G.Musk 1981.] [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Ted Finch]


MONTEREY (2)
The "Monterey" was built in 1932 by the Bethlehem Shipbuilding Corp, Quincy, Mass. for the US, Matson Line. She was an 18,655 gross ton ship, length 632ft x beam 79ft, two funnels, two masts, twin screw and a speed of 20 knots. She commenced her maiden voyage from San Francisco to New Zealand and Australia on 3.6.1932. In 1940 she was sent to the Far East to evacuate American subjects. Between 1941 and 1946 she was used as a troopship and then laid up at Alameda until 1952 when she was sold to the US government for further use as a troopship. Repurchased in 1956 by Matson Line and renamed "Matsonia", she was refitted at Newport News and commenced sailing between Los Angeles and Honolulu on 11.6.1957. In December 1963 she was renamed "Lurline" and in 1970 was sold to the Greek, Chandris Lines and renamed "Britanis". She was refitted at Piraeus and on 21.2.1971 commenced Southampton - round the world cruises. I have no information on her history after this.[ Pacific Liners by F.Emmons] {posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 8 December 1997]


MONTEREY (3)
There was another "Monterey" built in 1932 at Newport News as the "Haiti"for the Columbia Steamship Co. This was a 5,236 gross ton vessel, single screw and a speed of 18 knots. There was accommodation for 120-1st and 24-tourist passengers and she also carried refrigerated cargo. She was originally designed to run between New York and Port-au-Prince, Kingston, Jamaica, Puerto Columbia and Cristobal. In 1938 she transferred to the New York - Puerto Rico service and was renamed "Puerto Rico". In 1939 she went to the Ward Line and was named "Monterey". In 1942 she was chartered to the US Army and roughly converted to a troopship at New York. After a long voyage to the Persian Gulf and India, her conversion was completed to carry just over 1,000 troops. She took an active part in the Operation Torch landings in French North Africa and was then used to carry reinforcements to US bases in the West Indies, Brazil, etc. Her war service was finished by repatriating personnel from the Mediterranean. In 1948 she was sold to Turkish owners and renamed "Adana", but in 1952 her engine room flooded while at anchor off Istanbul and she was beached in shallow water. I have no further information on this ship. [ Sea Breezes magazine, vol.14,p.56, July 1952] [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 8 December 1997]


MONTEVIDEO
See SILESIA.


MONTEZUMA
The MONTEZUMA was a 3-masted, square-rigged ship, built in New York in 1843 by the shipbuilding firm of Webb & Allen for the Black Ball Line of packets between New York and Liverpool. 924 tons; 162' x 35' 8" x 21' (length x beam x depth of hold). Unusually for her time, she was painted with dummy gun ports, like a Blackwall frigate. She served in the Black Ball Line until she was wrecked on Jones Beach, Long Island, on 18 May 1854, on a voyage from Liverpool to New York, carrying almost 500 immigrant passengers; by efficient work, all passengers and crew were saved. The MONTEZUMA was one of the fastest packets of her day, her westbound passages averaging 34 days, with her fastest passage being 27 days, and her slowest being 57 days [Robert Greenhalgh Albion, Square-riggers on Schedule; The New York Sailing Packets to England, France, and the Cotton Ports (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1938), pp. 198, 225, 276]. [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 19 November 1997]


MONTFORT
The "Montfort" was built in 1899 by Palmers Co Ltd, Jarrow-on-Tyne for Elder Dempster's Beaver Line. She was a 5,519 gross ton ship, length 445ft x beam 52.2ft, one funnel, four masts, twin screw and a speed of 13 knots. Built primarily as a cargo vessel, she had accommodation for only 12-1st class passengers. Launched on 13/2/1899, she sailed from the Tyne on her maiden voyage to Quebec and Montreal on 26/4/1899. In May 1899 she made her first of four Avonmouth - Montreal passages. She was transferred to trooping duties for the Boer War and commenced her first of three Liverpool - Capetown voyages on 11/11/1899. She also made one round voyage from each of Halifax, New Orleans and Fiume to Capetown. In 1900 she was refitted to carry 30-1st class and 1,200-3rd class passengers and her tonnage increased to 7,087 tons. Her first passenger voyage between Liverpool, Quebec and Montreal commenced on 17/7/1900 and she received several refits to various tonnages between 1901-1903. In 1903, the "Montfort" went to Canadian Pacific together with the rest of Beaver Line's Canadian fleet and her accommodation was altered to carry 30-2nd and 1,200-3rd class passengers. The following year the company switched its service from Avonmouth to London/Antwerp to Canada and on the eastbound journey, the third class berths were frequently dismantled in Montreal and replaced with portable stalls to carry upwards of 1,200 head of cattle to London. In 1909, she was again rebuilt to 6,578 tons and on 1st Oct.1918 was torpedoed and sunk by the German submarine U.55, 170 miles from Bishops Rock, Scilly Islands, with the loss of 5 lives. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.3, p.1306] [Canadian Pacific 100 years by George Musk] [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 7 January 1998]


MONTICELLO (1)
See CONTE GRANDE.


MONTICELLO (2)
See KAISER WILHELM II (2).


MONTLAURIER
See PRINZ FRIEDRICH WILHELM.


MONTMORENCY
See MONTROSE (2) .


MONTNAIRN
See PRINZ FRIEDRICH WILHELM.


MONTREAL
The first "Montreal" was built by C.S.Swan & Hunter, Wallsend-on-Tyne (engines by Wallsend Slipway Co Ltd) in 1900. She was a 6,870 gross ton ship, length 469.5ft x beam 56.2ft, one funnel, four masts, twin screw and a speed of 13 knots. She was launched on 28/4/1900 for Elder Dempster's Beaver Line and sailed from the Tyne on her maiden voyage to Montreal and London on 4/7/1900. She then left London on 26/8/1900 on a single round voyage to Montreal before being transferred as a troopship between New Orleans and Cape Town for the Boer War for 7 voyages. In 1903 she was purchased by Canadian Pacific, together with the rest of Elder Dempster's Canadian assets. She was rebuilt to 8,644 gross tons and with accommodation for 1,000-3rd class passengers in 1904, and in April of that year, made her first London - Antwerp - Quebec - Montreal voyage. In August 1914 at the outbreak of the Great War, she was at Antwerp undergoing engine repairs, together with the "Montrose" which was waiting to bunker. The "Montreal" transferred her coal bunkers to the "Montrose", which then towed her, together with a large number of refugees to Gravesend. On 1/4/1915 she was requisitioned as a troopship, and on 29/1/1918 was in collision with the White Star Liner "Cedric". She was taken in tow, but on 30/1/1918 she sank 14 miles from the Bar Lightship, Liverpool with no loss of life. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.3, p.1306-7] [Canadian Pacific-100 Years by George Musk] - [Posted to the ShipsList by Ted Finch - 19 March 1998]


MONTROSE (1)
MONTROSE. Built 1897 by Sir Raylton Dixon & Co., Middlesborough for Elder Dempster & Co. 7094 gross tons, length 444.3ft x beam 52ft, one funnel, four masts, single screw and a speed of 12 knots. Originally built as a refrigerated cargo steamer with accommodation for 12-1st class passengers. Launched on 17/6/1897 and commenced her maiden voyage from Middlesborough - Quebec - Montreal in September of that year. On 29/10/1897 she commenced running between Avonmouth and Montreal until 1900 when she was chartered to the government and made eight voyages to Capetown to carry the Dublin & Denbigh Imperial Yeomanry and their horses to the Boer War. In 1903, she was laid up at Liverpool and was taken over by Canadian Pacific and rebuilt to carry 70-2nd class and 1,800-3rd class passengers. On 20/4/1903 she commenced running between Liverpool - Quebec - Montreal and on 7/4/1904 was transferred to the London - Antwerp - St John NB and London - Antwerp - Quebec - Montreal services. It was during this period that the infamous Dr.Crippen and his secretary Ethel Le Neve (dressed as a boy) aroused the suspicions of the master, who radioed the Liverpool office with his suspicions and the pair were arrested for murder in the St Lawrence. On the outbreak of war in 1914, the "Montrose" was in Antwerp waiting to bunker and the "Montreal" was also there for engine repairs. The coal on the "Montreal" was transferred to the "Montrose" who then towed the other vessel to the UK. On 20/10/1914 she was sold to the admiralty who intended to use her as a blockship in Dover harbour, but during a gale, she broke her moorings and drifted out to sea where she went aground on the Goodwin Sands and was lost. Her mast was visible there until 1963. [Canadian Pacific - 100 years. G.Musk 1981.] [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Ted Finch]After their arrest, Dr.Crippen and Ethel Le Neve were escorted back to England on the White Star MEGANTIC.. [Additional information via E-mail from David Bell -29 December, 1997]


MONTROSE (2)
The "Montrose" was a sister ship to the "Montclare" and the third "Montcalm". She was built in 1920 by Fairfield Co Ltd, Glasgow for Canadian Pacific Line, and it was originally intended to name her "Montmorency" after the great waterfall in Quebec, but this was changed before launch. She was a 16,402 gross ton ship, length 548.7ft x beam 70.2ft, two funnels, two masts, twin screw and a speed of 16 knots. There was passenger accommodation for 542-cabin and 1,268-3rd class. Launched on 14/12/1920 by Lady Raeburn, wife of the Director-General of the Ministry of Shipping, she sailed from Liverpool on her maiden voyage to Quebec and Montreal on 5/5/1922. In April 1928 she was refitted to carry cabin, tourist and 3rd class passengers, and the same year, struck an iceberg in thick fog near St John. This caused damage to the bows and killed two seamen by falling ice, but the ship was able to proceed to Liverpool. On 18/7/1928 she commenced her first Antwerp - Southampton - Quebec - Montreal voyage, and on 29/5/1929 started her first Hamburg - Southampton - Cherbourg - Quebec - Montreal sailing. In April and May 1929 two calls were also made at Cardiff to pick up emigrants from South Wales. She was fitted with single reduction geared turbines by Harland & Wolff, Belfast in 1931 and on 6/6/1933 started her last Hamburg - Canada voyage having made 11 round voyages on this service. Between 26/3/1932 and 24/6/1939 she made 46 pleasure cruises as well as some North Atlantic voyages from Hamburg, Antwerp, Southampton or Liverpool. She was also chartered by the Royal Empire Society in May 1937 for a four day cruise from Liverpool to Spithead for the Coronation naval review. In January 1939 her accommodation was altered to carry cabin and 3rd class only and on 25/8/1939 she commenced her last voyage from Liverpool to Belfast, Greenock, Quebec, Montreal and Liverpool (arr.11/9/1939), having made 152 round voyages on the North Atlantic. On 12/9/1939 she was requisitioned by the Admiralty, converted to an Armed Merchant Cruiser and renamed HMS FORFAR. She joined the Northern Patrol, and on 2/12/1940 when on route to meet a convoy from Halifax, and 400 miles west of Ireland, she was hit by a single torpedo fired from the German submarine U.99. Half an hour later she was hit by two more torpedoes, but it was not until she was hit by two further torpedoes that she finally sank at 0500 hours. HMCS ST LAURENT picked up 20 survivors and another 200 were rescued by HMS VISCOUNT and a tramp steamer, but 184 men were lost. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P. Bonsor, vol.3, p.1316] [Canadian Pacific - 100 Years by George Musk] - [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 8 April 1998]


MONTROYAL
See EMPRESS OF BRITAIN.


MONTSERRAT
See DANIA.


MORAVIA
The "Moravia" of 1885 was an iron steamer, built by A & J Inglis at Glasgow in 1882, originally built as the "Bengore Head II" she was aquired by the Hamburg America Line in 1883 and renamed "Moravia". Her dimensions were 3739 tons gross, length 350.5ft x beam 40.2ft. straight stem, one funnel, two masts, single screw and a speed of 12 knots. There was accommodation for 100 1st and 1200 3rd class passengers. From 1883 to 1886 she sailed between Hamburg - Havre - New York and on 1.7.1886 she was transferred to the Stettin - NY service. At the end of 1898 she was sold to Robert Sloman of Hamburg who intended to use her for the Hamburg - NY service but on her first voyage she was wrecked off Sable Island on 12.2.1899. [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Ted Finch - 23 July 1997]

The "Moravia" of 1884 was built in 1883 by A & J.Inglis, Glasgow as the "Bengore Head" for the Ulster SS Co. of Ireland. She was a 3,739 gross ton ship, length 361.3ft x beam 40.7ft, one funnel, two masts, iron construction, single screw and a speed of 12 knots. There was accommodation for 100-1st and 1,200-3rd class passengers. Launched on 4/8/1883, she was bought the same year by Hamburg America Line and renamed "Moravia". She commenced her first voyage on 18/11/1883 from Hamburg to Havre and New York and on 1/7/1886 started her first Stettin - New York voyage. On 25/11/1898 she commenced her last Hamburg - Havre - New York voyage and later the same year was sold to Sloman of Hamburg who intended to name her "Parma", but this was never done. In Jan 1899 she sailed from Hamburg for New York but on 12/2/1899 was wrecked on Sable Island with no loss of life. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.1,p.393] [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 23 November 1997]


MORAVIAN
SS.Moravian, Allan Line. 100 saloon berths. Years of service 1864-1881. 2500tons, 320 x 39 ft., lengthened to 389 ft. 3300 tons in 1874. 1 funnel, 3 masts, iron hull. Wrecked on Flat Island off the Nova Scotian coast on dec.30, 1881. Sister ship Peruvian made round trip Monville-Portland-Monville in 24d 15h, an outstanding performance. [Posted to The ShipsList by Paul Petersen - 23 November 1997]

The "Moravian" was built by R.Steele & Co, Greenock in 1864 for the Allan Line. This was a 2,481 gross ton ship, length 320.9ft x beam 39.5ft, clipper stem, one funnel, three masts(barque rigged for sails), iron construction, single screw and a speed of 11 knots. Accommodation was provided for 80-1st and 600-3rd class passengers. Launched on 5/7/1864, she sailed on her maiden voyage from Liverpool to Portland on 10/11/1864. On 11/5/1865, she commenced her first voyage from Liverpool to Quebec and Montreal, and in 1875 was rebuilt to 3,323 tons, 389.3ft in length and compound engines fitted by Laird Bros, Birkenhead. On 19/11/1874 she resumed sailing from Liverpool to Portland and on 7/12/1881 left Liverpool and was wrecked near Cape Sable on 30/12/1881 with no loss of life. [ North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.1,p.311] {Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 13 December 1997]

The Moravian of the Allan Line - John Graham was Captain of in 1868. Only 2,466 tons, she was lengthened from 320 feet to 389 feet and refitted with compound machinery. She was wrecked off the cost of Nova Scotia in 1881. - [E-Mail from Marj Kohli - 10 Mar 1998]


MOREAS
See COLUMBIA (6).


MORETON BAY
The "Moreton Bay" was a well known emigrant ship. She was a 14,376 gross ton liner, built by Vickers, Barrow in 1921 for the Aberdeen & Commonwealth Line. She was a twin screw, 15 knot vessel, one funnel, two masts, and refrigerated cargo space and there was accommodation for 12-1st and 720-3rd class passengers. She was the first of five sister ships, the most famous of which was the ill fated "Jervis Bay". She commenced her maiden voyage on 7/12/1921 when she left London via Suez to Fremantle, Adelaide, Melbourne, Sydney and Brisbane. In August 1939 she was commissioned as an Armed Merchant Cruiser and in August 1941 converted to a troop transport. After the war, she was reconditioned to carry 514-tourist class passengers and returned to the emigrant service, sailing between London, Southampton, Malta, Port Said, Aden, Colombo, Fremantle, Melbourne and Sydney. In 1951 she was taken over by Shaw Saville & Albion and commenced her last voyage on 30/11/1956. She was scrapped at Barrow the following year. [North Star to Southern Cross by John M.Maber] - [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 6 February 1998]


MORMACLAND
See ANNA SALEN.


MORMACMAIL
See SEVEN SEAS.


MORMACSUN
See FLORENCE NIGHTINGALE.


MOSEL
MOSEL, built in 1872 for Norddeutscher Lloyd (North German Lloyd) by Caird & Co., Greenock, Scotland. 3,200 tons; 349 feet long x 40 feet broad; straight bow, 1 funnel, 2 masts; iron construction, screw propulsion, service speed 13 knots; accommodation for 90 1st-, 126 2nd-, and 600-3rd class passengers. 20 August 1872, launched. 1 April 1873, maiden voyage, Bremen-Southampton-New York. 12 November 1875, bomb explosion in dock at Bremerhaven, killing 128. 1882, compound engines by Elder, Glasgow. 9 August 1882, wrecked near Lizard, Cornwall [Noel Reginald Pixell Bonsor, North Atlantic Seaway; An Illustrated History of the Passenger Services Linking the Old World with the New (2nd ed.; Jersey, Channel Islands: Brookside Publications), vol. 2 (1978), p. 548. Pictured in Michael J. Anuta, Ships of Our Ancestors (Menominee, MI: Ships of Our Ancestors, 1983; reprint Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., [1993]), p. 214, courtesy of the Peabody Essex Museum, East India Square, Salem, MA 01970 [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 26 July 1997]


MOSKVA (1)
See HAMMONIA (2).


MOSKVA (2)
See FURST BISMARCK.


MOUNT CLAY
The "Mount Clay" was built in 1904 by A.G.Vulkan at Stettin as the "Prinz Eitel Friedrich" for Norddeutscher Lloyd [North German Lloyd]. She was a 8865 gross ton vessel, length 488.3ft x beam 55.7ft, two funnels, two masts, twin screw and a speed of 15 knots. There was accommodation for 6-cabin class and 1,300-3rd class passengers. I don't have any information on her early history but suspect she was used on the Far East service as she left Tsingtao, China on 6/8/1914 and arrived at Newport News on 11/3/1915 where she stayed until 1916. She was then escorted to Philadelphia in October of that year and was seized by the US government and renamed "De Kalb" in April 1917 when America entered the war. In 1920 she was rebuilt by the Morse Drydock & Repair Co and taken over by the Panamanian flag, United American Lines, who renamed her "Mount Clay". On 26/12/1920 she sailed from New York for Hamburg, Boston and New York. In 1923 her accommodation was increased to accommodate 110-cabin class passengers and on 15/10/1925 she commenced her last voyage from Hamburg to Queenstown [Cobh] and New York. It would appear that she was then laid up as I have no further information on her until she was scrapped in 1934. [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Ted Finch - 11 September 1997]


MOUNT VERNON
See.KRONPRINZESSIN CECILIE.


MOUZINHO
See GUGLIELMO PEIRCE.


MUNCHEN
The "Munchen" of 1891 was built in 1889 by the Fairfield Co Ltd, Glasgow for North German Lloyd of Bremen. She was a 4,536 gross ton ship, length 390.5ft x beam 46.7ft, one funnel, two masts, single screw and a speed of 13 knots. There was accommodation for 38-1st, 20-2nd and 1,763-3rd class passengers. Launched on 23/1/1889, she sailed from Bremen on her maiden voyage to Montevideo and Buenos Aires on 11/3/1889. On 5/6/1889 she commenced her first Bremen - Baltimore voyage and on 25/9/1890 started her first Bremen - New York - Baltimore crossing. She commenced her sixth and last Bremen - South America voyage on 10/11/1892 and her nineteenth and last North Atlantic crossing on 24/3/1900 when she sailed from Bremen for Baltimore and New York. On 23/5/1900 she started a single round voyage from Bremen to the Suez Canal and Australia and on 3/2/1902 went aground on Yap Caroline Islands, was refloated and was sold to the Northern SS Co of Russia, who renamed her "Gregory Morch". She made two round voyages from Odessa to Piraeus and New York starting 27/10/1906 and 18/1/1907 and was scrapped in 1910. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.2, p.553-4] - [Posted to The ShipdList by Ted Finch - 4 March 1998]

The steamship MUNCHEN was built by Fairfield Shipbuilding & Engineering Co, Glasgow (ship no. 337), for Norddeutscher Lloyd, and launched on 23 January 1889. 4,803 tons. 119,1 x 14,23 meters/391 x 47 feet (length x breadth); straight bow, 1 funnel, 2 masts; steel construction, screw propulsion (triple-expansion engine, 2,600 to 3,000 horsepower), service speed 13 knots; accommodation for 38 passengers in 1st class, 20 in 2nd class, and 1,763 in steerage; crew of 100. 11 March 1889, maiden voyage, Bremen-Montevideo-Buenos Aires (to 10 November 1892, 6 roundtrip voyages, Bremen-South America). 5 June 1889, first voyage, Bremen-Baltimore. 25 September 1890, first voyage, Bremen-New York-Baltimore. 24 March 1900, last voyage, Bremen-New York-Baltimore (19 roundtrip voyages on the North Atlantic). 23 May 1900, Bremen-Suez Canal-Sydney (arrived 18 July). 25 July 1900, sailed for Queensland ports-German New Guinea-the Carolines-Hong Kong. 3 February 1901, on third voyage, stranded on Yap, Caroline Islands; refloated by Hong Kong Inspector Capt. W. Meissel, and arrived at Hong Kong 28 June 1901. September 1901, repaired by and registered for S. C. Farnham, Boyd & Co, Shanghai. 1905, registered to H. Robertson, then to Northern Steamship Co, Odessa (Paul Morch, manager); renamed GREGORY MORCH. 27 October 1906-18 January 1907, 2 roundtrip voyages, Odessa-Piraeus-New York. 1910, sold to T. W. Ward, Sheffield, for Scrapping; reverted to name MUNCHEN for delivery voyage; scrapped by Schell, at Morecambe, Lancashire [Edwin Drechsel, Norddeutscher Lloyd Bremen, 1857-1970; History, Fleet, Ship Mails (2 vols.; Vancouver: Cordillera Pub. Co., c1994-c1995), vol. 1, p. 126, no. 72 (photograph); Noel Reginald Pixell Bonsor, North Atlantic Seaway; An Illustrated History of the Passenger Services Linking the Old World with the New (2nd ed.; Jersey, Channel Islands: Brookside Publications), vol. 2 (1978), pp. 553-554]. - [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 4 March 1998]


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