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DALRIADA
The DALRIADA was a 3-masted, square-rigged ship, built at Quebec, by George H. Parke, in 1849. 1383/1504 (or 1507) tons (old/new measurement). 184 x 34 x 24.7 feet (length x beam x depth of hold). She was re-registered at Belfast on 1 October 1849 [Frederick William Wallace, Record of Canadian shipping; a list of squarerigged vessels, mainly 500 tons and over, built in the Eastern Provinces of British North America from the year 1786 to 1920 (London: Hodder & Stoughton, 1929), quoted in Maritime Museum of the Great Lakes at
Canadian Ship Information Database. The annual volumes of Lloyd's Register of Shipping for 1850/51-1861/62 contain the following information on the DALRIADA: Master: 1850/51 - Kell[e]y; 1851/52 - T. Smith; 1851/52-1856/57 - J. Scott; 1857/58-1861/62 - Ewing. Owner: Granger. Port of Registry: 1850/51-1855/56 - Belfast; 1856/57 - Liverpool; 1857/58-1858/59 - Belfast; 1859/60-1861/62 - [none given]. Port of Survey: 1850/51-1855/56 - Liverpool [1851/52 also has"London" crossed out]; 1856/57 - London; 1857/58-1858/59 - Liverpool; 1859/60-1861/62 - [not given]. Destined Voyage: 1850/51 - New Orleans; 1851/52 - Callao; Quebec [crossed out]; 1851/52-1853/54 - Bombay; 1854/55-1855/56 - Valparaiso; 1856/57 - Akyab; 1857/58-1858/59 - Aden; 1859/60-1861/62 - [not given]. The DALRIADA is last mentioned in .Lloyd's Register for 1861/62; however, she was last surveyed in 1856, and as Lloyd's Register often kept vessels on the register for several years after they were lost, condemned, or sold foreign (that is, until they were officially notified of such an occurrence), it is possible that the DALRIADA was lost, condemned, or sold foreign several years before 1861. If you wish to determine precisely the DALRIADA's fate, your most efficient method to do so is to check the microfilmed annual indexes to Lloyd's List (which record vessel movements and casualties) beginning in 1857. Copies of these microfilms are held by the Memorial University of Newfoundland , the last of which provides a research service for $35 Canadian per hour, minimum one hour. - [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 28 September 1998]


DANBY
The "Danby" was a 4,281 ton ship, built in 1937 By Wm.Gray & Co for Ropner's of Hartlepool. This was one of the biggest and best known tramp ship owners in the UK and the "Danby" was still sailing in 1954. - [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 24 April 1998]


DANIA
The "Dania" was built for Hamburg America Line in 1889 by A.G.Vulcan, Stettin. She was a 4,076 gross ton ship, length 370.7ft x beam 44.3ft, one funnel, two masts, single screw and a speed of 14 knots. There was passenger accommodation for 30-1st and 1,400-3rd class. Launched on 12th October 1889, she sailed from Hamburg on her maiden voyage to Havre and New York on 16th December 1889. She continued on this service until commencing her last Hamburg - New York voyage on 20th October 1895. Acquired by Compagnia Trasatlantica of Spain for trooping duties in the Cuban rebellion in 1895 and renamed "Montserrat", she was returned to Hamburg America Lines and her previous name in 1896. In 1897 she was purchased by Cia Trasatlantica and again renamed "Montserrat", and was refitted to accommodate 121-1st, 36-2nd and 1,000-3rd class passengers. Her first commercial voyage started on 26th June 1900 when she left Barcelona for Malaga, Cadiz, New York and Havana. Her last voyage commenced 27th June 1924 from Vera Cruz to Havana, New York, Cadiz and Barcelona. In 1926 she was sold and scrapped the following year at Genoa. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.1, p.396] - [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 8 August 1998]

The steamship DANIA (I) was build by AG "Vulcan", Stettin (Ship #189), for the HAPAG (the Hamburg-America Line), and launched on 12 October 1889. 4,076 tons; 112,98 x 13,50 meters (length x breadth); straight bow, 1 funnel, 2 masts; steel construction, screw propulsion, triple-expansion engines, service speed 14 knots; accommodation for 30 passengers in 1st class and 1,400 in steerage; crew of 78. 16 December 1889, maiden voyage, Hamburg-Havre-New York. 20 October 1895, last voyage, Hamburg-New York. 1895, MONTSERRAT (Cia Trasatlantica, Barcelona). 1896, returned to HAPAG under her original name. 1897, returned to Cia Trasatlantica under the name MONTSERRAT; accommodation for 121 passengers in 1st class, 36 in 2nd class, and 1,000 in steerage. 26 June 1900, first voyage, Barcelona-Malaga-Cadiz-New York-Havana. 30 November 1920, sunk in New York harbor after colliding with the American steamship SAN MARCOS; later raised and repaired. 27 June 1924, last voyage, Vera Cruz-Havana-New York-Cadiz-Barcelona. 1926 sold for scrapping; 1927, scrapped at Genoa [Arnold Kludas and Herbert Bischoff, Die Schiffe der Hamburg-Amerika-Linie, Bd. 1: 1847-1906 (Herford: Koehler, 1979), pp. 48-49 (photograph); Noel Reginald Pixell Bonsor, North Atlantic Seaway; An Illustrated History of the Passenger Services Linking the Old World with the New (2nd ed.; Jersey, Channel Islands: Brookside Publications), vol. 1 (1975), p. 396].- [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 8 August 1998]


DANIEL WEBSTER
The DANIEL WEBSTER was a wooden side-wheel steamer, built by William H.Brown, New York, for Cornelius Vanderbilt, and launched on 20 September 1851. 2 decks, 3 masts, round tuck, scroll head; 1,035 40/95 tons; 223' 4" x 31' x 18' 6" (length x beam x depth of hold); engine built by Allaire Iron Works; diameter of cylinder 4' 8", length of stroke 10'; 2 boilers 24' x 9', 34 lbs pressure; built with 31 staterooms and accommodations for 116 passengers. Operated from New York and New Orleans to San Juan and later to Aspinwall for Vanderbilt and Charles Morgan from 1851 to 1859. Chartered to the Quartermaster's Department, War Department, in 1861, 1862-1863, and 1863-1865 at $25,000 per job, and $400 to $900 per day. Went down 3 October 1866, en route to Mobile. Passengers taken off by the steamer GEORGE CROMWELL [John Haskell Kemble, The Panama Route, 1848-1869, University of California Publications in History, 29 (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1943), p. 223]. [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 24 November 1997]


DANISH PRINCE (of 1894)
See PRINCE LINE FREIGHTERS


DANMARK
See JAN BREYDEL.


DANTE ALIGHIERI
The "Dante Alighieri" was built by Societa Esercizio Baccini, Riva Trigoso in 1914 for Transatlanta Italiana. She was a 9754 gross ton vessel, length overall 503.7ft x beam 59.5ft, two funnels, two masts,twin screw and a speed of 16 knots. There was accommodation for 100-1st, 260-2nd and 1,825-3rd class passengers. Launched on 28/11/1914 she left Genoa on her maiden voyage for Palermo, Naples and New York on 10/2/1915 and commenced her last voyage on this service in October 1927. Arrived NY on 5/11/1927 and left for Lisbon, Naples and Genoa on 15/11/1927. In 1928 she was sold to a Japanese company and was renamed "Asahi Maru". Her funnels reduced to one in 1940 and on 5/2/1944 she was damaged in collision off Bisan Seto in the Japanese Inland Sea. In 1949 she was scrapped. [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Ted Finch]


DANUBE
See CHARLES DICKENS.


DARMSTADT
The "Darmstadt" was built by Fairfield & Co, Glasgow in 1890, for Norddeutscher Lloyd [North German Lloyd]. She was a 5012 gross ton vessel, length 415ft x beam 48ft, one funnel, two masts, steel construction, single screw and a speed of 13 knots. There was accommodation for 49-1st, 38-2nd and 1,904-3rd class passengers. Launched on 27/9/1890, she sailed from Bremen on her maiden voyage to Montevideo and Buenos Aires on 10/3/1891 and commenced her first voyage from Bremen to New York on 8/3/1892. On 11/10/1892 she left Bremen on her first voyage to the Far East via the Suez Canal and on 10/4/1895 commenced sailing Bremen - Suez - Australia. On 27/4/1905 she commenced her last voyage to the Far East after making 6 round voyages on this service and on 4/11/1905 resumed the Bremen - South America service. On 21/3/1906 she left Bremen on her last run to Australia after 16 round voyages, on 24/5/1907 started her last run Bremen - Baltimore, and on 28/2/1910 started her last voyage Bremen - New York after making a total of 27 round voyages on the North Atlantic service. She left Bremen for S.America on her last trip on 12/11/1910 and in 1911 was sold to a Turkish company and renamed "Kara Deniz". In 1914, on the outbreak of the Great War, she was seized at Bombay and laid up. In 1923 she was scrapped. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.2, p556] [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 7 October 1997]


DE GRASSE
The "De Grasse" of 1947 had a long and varied career. She was laid down in 1920 by Cammel Laird of Birkenhead as the "Suffren" for Compagnie Generale Transatlantique (CGT) but building was suspended until 1923 and she was finally launched as the "De Grasse" for CGT on 23/2/1924. She was a 17,707 gross ton liner, length overall 574ft x beam 71.4ft, two funnels, two masts, twin screw and a speed of 16 knots. Accommodation for 399-cabin class and 1,712-3rd class passengers. She sailed from Havre on her maiden voyage to New York on 21/8/1924 and in 1927 was converted to carry 536-cabin, tourist and 410-3rd class passengers. On 18/8/1939 she left Havre on her last peacetime voyage and was seized by the Germans in 1940 and became an accommodation ship near Bordeaux. Returned to CGT in 1942, she was used as a training ship and on 30/8/1945 she was depth charged by a German E-Boat and sank in shallow water. In 1945 she was raised and rebuilt as a 19,918 gross ton ship with one funnel and accommodation for 360-1st class and 360 cabin class passengers and on 12/7/1947 resumed the Havre - New York service. She left Havre on 30/9/1951 on her last trip on this run and was transferred to the Havre - West Indies service. In 1953 she was sold to Canadian Pacific and renamed "Empress of Australia", rebuilt to 19379 tons and accommodation for 220-1st and 444-tourist class passengers and put onto the Liverpool - Quebec - Montreal run. She made 38 round voyages and was then laid up in 1955 at Gareloch until sold to Grimaldi in 1956, renamed "Venezuela" and further rebuilt to 18567 tons, 180-1st class, 500-tourist class and 800-dormitory class passengers. She was used on several routes from Naples to Mediterranean, West Indian and American ports and in 1960 was fitted with a new clipper stem which increased her length to 614.2ft. On 16/3/1962 she beached after striking rocks off Cannes, was refloated and towed to Genoa and in 1962, was scrapped at Spezia. [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Ted Finch]


DE KALB
See MOUNT CLAY.


DELAWARE
See CITY OF NEW YORK (2) .


DELFTDYKE
The "Delftdyke" was a 10,220 gross ton ship, built by Wilton, Schiedam in 1929 for Holland America Line's Rotterdam - Vancouver cargo-passenger service. Her dimensions were length 509ft x beam 65ft, one funnel, two masts, twin screw and a speed of 14.5 knots. There was accommodation for 30 cabin class passengers. On 10th May 1940 she was bombed off Flushing, and again at Peterhead in Sept.1941 which put her out of service for a year. In Jan.1950 she was damaged by a mine at the mouth of the Weser, was rebuilt with new engines, funnel, bridge and bows, and renamed "Dongedyk". She resumed service to Vancouver in 1952 and in June 1966 was sold to Toshin Trading Co, Kobe, renamed "Tung Long" for a voyage to Kaohsiung, where she was broken up. Her sister ships were "Damsterdyk" and "Dalerdyk" [Holland America Line, a 120th Anniversary Celebration in Postcards by Peter C.Kohler, published by Ship Pictorial Publications, The Cabinet, High Street, Coltishall, Norfolk ] [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 22 December 1997]


DELHI
See NEMESIS.


DENISE
See SCOTIA .


DE RUYTER
The "De Ruyter" was built by A.Stephen & Sons, Glasgow in 1873 as the "Tromp" for T.C.Engels & Co, Flushing. She was a 2,280 gross ton ship, length 320ft x beam 36.1ft, straight stem, one funnel, three masts, iron construction, single screw and a speed of 10 knots. Launched on 15th May 1873, she sailed from Nieuwediep, Holland in June 1873 for Batavia and stranded in the Gulf of Suez on 1st July. Refloated on 10th August, she was temporarily repaired at Suez and then proceeded to La Seyne (Toulon) where she was reconditioned. She sailed to New York in ballast in June 1874 and then to London and Antwerp. The company withdrew from the Far Eastern trade and the ship was renamed "De Ruyter" in 1875 and transferred from Dutch to Belgian registry. She commenced her first Antwerp - New York sailing on 6th Aug 1876, her second on 20th May 1877 and her third on 1st April 1878. Between these voyages she was used on the South American service. On 26th June 1879 she commenced joint sailings with the White Cross Line between Antwerp and New York and her last passenger sailing on this route started on 22nd July 1884. Subsequently she maintained a cargo service between Antwerp, Boston and New York. She sailed from Antwerp on her last Boston - New York voyage on 12th March 1894 but went missing with the loss of 37 lives. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P. Bonsor, vol.3, p.996] - [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 19 August 1998]


DES MOINES
The DES MOINES was a side-wheel packet, built in Madison, Indiana, in 1857. 298 tons; wood hull. 1857-1861, in the Keokuk Packet Co, J.D. Malin, master; part owner, Capt. John G. Prather. Appropriated by the War Department for transport service during the Civil War, and in 1864 was up the Red River. 22 November 1864, struck and sank the steamer KATIE at Diamond Island, Ohio River. Off the lists in 1865; her machinery went to the steamer CORNELIA [Frederick Way, Jr., Way's Packet Directory, 1848-1994; Passenger Steamboats of the Mississippi River System Since the Advent of Photography in Mid-Continent America (revised edition; Athens, Ohio: Ohio University Press, 1994)p. 125, packet #1512]. [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 16 December 1997]


DEUCALION
The vessel in question is the ship Deucalion (after the son of Prometheus), which arrived at New Orleans on Sunday, 7 December 1845, Allen, master, 40 days from Le Havre; she cleared on 16 January 1846 for Boston [New Orleans Daily Picayune, 9 December 1845 and 18 January 1846]. There is only one vessel of this name in the 1830's/1840's, and she is indeed identical to the ship of built in 1836 by Magoun for his firm of Boston ship owners and operators, T. Magoon & Son [William Armstrong Fairburn, Merchant Sail (Center Lovell, ME; Fairburn Marine Educational Foundation, [1945-55]), V.2900]. Her tonnage is given variously as 509 or 513. The following additional references are taken from Carl C. Cutler, Queens of the Western Ocean; The Story of America's Mail and Passenger Sailing Lines (Annapolis: United States Naval Institute, c1961):

1837 - Ship Deucalion, 513 tons, A. Winsor, master, in the Regular Line of Boston-New Orleans packets [p. 445]
1840 - Ship Deucalion, 513 tons, Howes, master, in Dispatch Line of Boston-New Orleans packets [p. 451]
1841 - Ship Deucalion, 513 tons, Howes, master, in Allen's Packet Line, Boston-Mobile [p. 440]
1847 - Ship Deucalion, 513 tons, Baker, master, in Dispatch Line of Boston-New Orleans packets. [p. 452]
1849 - Oliver G. Lane, master [pp. 440, 445, and 452]

Although the Daily Picayune does not state indicate at what port she was registered, I suspect that the Deucalion was registered at Boston. Vessel registration and enrollment certificates, which date from the 1780's, contain such information as the name of the vessel, its year and place of construction, its tonnage, and its present owner. Changes of ownership, as well as major "rebuilds" of vessels required a change of registration, and it is often possible to chart a vessel's history through its various registration certificates. I therefore recommend that you contact the National Archives in Washington, DC, and ask the staff to check RG [Record Group] 41, Registration and Enrollment Certificates for the Port of Boston, for registration certificates for the Deucalion. Finally, the records for the port of Le Havre for the 1840's, including passenger lists, were not destroyed. However, they cover only vessels of French registry, and the Deucalion, like the overwhelming majority of other vessels sailing between the United States and Le Havre, was of American registry. .[Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 17 June 1997]


DEUTSCHLAND (1)
A three masted ship rigged sailing vessel built in 1858 belonging to the Hamburg America Line. She was sold in 1867. Sailed between Hamburg and East Coast ports of America..[Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Ted Finch - 12 July 1997]


DEUTSCHLAND (2)
Sailed from Bremen and belonged to Norddeutscher Lloyd (North German Lloyd). It was a 2800 ton iron steamer built by Caird & Co. at Glasgow in 1866. She had a clipper stem, one funnel and two masts, single screw and a speed of 11 knots. There was accommodation for 60 1st, 120 2nd, 700 3rd class passengers. She left Bremen for Southampton and New York on 14.10.1866 on her maiden voyage. She stayed on this service until 1875 when she was wrecked off Kentish Knock, in the Thames Estuary with the loss of 157 lives. ..[Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Ted Finch - 12 July 1997]


DEUTSCHLAND (3)
The "Deutschland" of 1900 was the third vessel of that name belonging to Hamburg America Line. She was built A.G.Vulkan of Stettin and launched on 10.1.1900. and was a 16,502 ton vessel, length 660.9ft x beam 67.3ft, four funnels (set in pairs), two masts, twin screw and a speed of 22 knots. She could carry 450-1st, 300-2nd and 350-3rd class passengers. She left Hamburg for Plymouth and New York on her maiden voyage on 4.7.1900 and took the blue riband for the fastest crossing of the Atlantic in both directions, although she suffered from excessive vibration at high speeds. In 1902, this caused her rudder and stern post to snap off and repairs took five months. She made her last voyage on this run on 24.9.1910. In 1911 she was rebuilt as a 17 knot cruise vessel with accommodation for 487-1st class passengers and renamed "Victoria Luise". She sailed between Hamburg - Southampton - Cherbourg - NY until the outbreak of war in 1914 when she intended to be converted to an auxiliary cruiser at Hamburg. She was not converted or surrendered to the Allies in 1919 due to her generally poor condition and in 1920 was damaged by fire during her reconditioning. She was rebuilt with two funnels and accommodation for 36 cabin class and 1,350-3rd class passengers and renamed "Hansa". Sailed between Hamburg and NY with a further rebuild in 1922 to carry 224 cabin and 1,065-3rd class passengers. Last voyage 25.9.1924 and scrapped in 1925 at Hamburg. [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Ted Finch- 10 August 1997]


DEUTSCHLAND (4)
The DEUTSCHLAND was built for HAPAG (Hamburg-Amerikanische Packetfahrt Aktiengesellschaft = the Hamburg America Line) by Blohm & Voss, Hamburg (ship #405), and launched on 28 April 1923. 20,607 tons; 184,8 x 22.2 meters (length x breadth); 2 funnels, 4 masts, clipper stern; twin-screw propulsion (single-reduction steam turbines), service speed 16 knots; passenger accommodation: 221 in 1st class, 402 in 2nd class, 935 in 3rd class; crew of 420. The DEUTSCHLAND was the fourth vessel of this name owned by HAPAG. 27 March 1924, maiden voyage, Hamburg-Southampton-New York. 1 March 1928, passenger accommodation changed to 1st, 2nd, tourist, and 3rd class. 12 December 1929, last voyage, Hamburg - Boulogne - Southampton - New York. 1930, re-engined; 20,742 tons; service speed 20 knots. 30 May 1930, resumed Hamburg-Southampton-New York service (passenger accommodation: 1st, 2nd, and tourist class). 9 November 1933, last voyage, Hamburg-Southampton-New York. 1934, lengthened to 206,3 meters; 21,046 tons; service speed 22 knots; passenger accommodation: 200 in 1st class, 360 in tourist class, 400 in 3rd class. 8 February 1934, resumed Hamburg-Southampton- Cherbourg-New York service. February 1936, passenger accommodation designated cabin, tourist, and 3rd class. 3 August 1939, last voyage, Hamburg-Southampton-Cherbourg-New York (arrived 11 August, departed 17 August)-Hamburg. 1940, accommodation ship for the German navy at Gotenhafen. 1945, on 7 passages, carried 70,000 refugees from Eastern Germany to the West. 3 May 1945, sunk in the Lubecker Bucht off Neutadt by the same British air attack that sank the CAP ARCONA. 1948, wreck raised and scrapped. Sources: Arnold Kludas and Herbert Bischoff, Die Schiffe der Hamburg- Amerika-Linie , Bd. 2: 1907-1926 (Herford: Koehler, 1980), p. 118 (photograph); Arnold Kludas, Die grossen Passagierschiffe der Welt; Eine DokumentationBd. 2 (2nd ed.; Oldenburg/Hamburg: Gerhard Stalling, c1973), pp. 220-221 (photographs); Noel Reginald Pixell Bonsor, North Atlantic Seaway; An Illustrated History of the Passenger Services Linking the Old World with the New (2nd ed.; Jersey, Channel Islands: Brookside Publications), vol. 1 (1975), p. 417. Also pictured in Clas Broder Hansen, Passenger liners from Germany, 1816-1990, translated from the German by Edward Force (West Chester, Pennsylvania: Schiffer Pub., c1991), p. 118. - [E-mail from Michael Palmer 13 April 1998]


DEUTSCHLAND (5)
The Ship: "Deutschland" - Feb29 - May31:Built at Deutsche Werke Kiel. 1 Apr 33: Completed as "Deutschland" ; renamed 5. Nov 39 and classified as CA 1939: Raider in the North Atlantic . Apr 40: Member of Operation "Weseruebung". At Doebrack narrowness she got the 2800 mm shells for Norwegian coastal batteries, which took her out of action. On the way back she was hit by torpedoes of HMS Spearfish and lost rudder and screws. Towed by sub chaser and mine searcher to Kiel. 13 Apr 40: At Kiel for repairs. 12 Jun 41:Sent to Trondheim-Fjord (Norway). Near by Lindnesnes the got a torpedo hit by RAF Bristol Beaufighter torpedo bombers. With damaged engines back to Kiel (14. Jun) where she stayed until Jan 42.. 2 Feb 43: Luetzow became training ship. Stayed at Norway until 25.September 1 Oct 43: Back at Gotenhafen. Overhauls at Libau until Feb 44. Usedas training ship at Baltic Sea. Oct 44: Artillery support to German ground forces at Sworbe and Memel. Feb 45: Artillery support to German ground forces at Frauenburg. Mar/Apr 45: Covered evacuations at Danzig/Gotenhafen. 8 Apr 45: Withdrawal to Swinemuende due to lack of fuel and ammunition. 14 Apr 45: Sunk at Swinemuende after near hits by 6 ts bombs at shallow water, artillery kept ok. 28 Apr 45:Bombarded Soviet forces with 280 mm guns and blasted by crew. Scrapped by Soviet 1947 at Leningrad (uncertain information). - [Posted to the ShipsList by Robert "Woody" Wood - 20 March 1998]


DEVONIA
The "Devonia" was a 4,270 gross ton ship, built by Barrow Shipbuilding Co, Barrow in 1877 for the Anchor Line. Her details were - length 400.3ft x beam 42ft, straight stem, one funnel, three masts (rigged for sail), iron construction, single screw and a speed of 13 knots. There was passenger accommodation for 200-1st, 100-2nd and 800-3rd class. Launched on 28th Mar.1877, she sailed on her maiden voyage from Glasgow to Moville (Ireland) and New York on 2nd Jun.1877. Her last voyage on this service commenced 19th Oct.1893 (arr. NY 31/10). After this, she made an occasional voyage for Barrow Steamship Co, but was mostly laid up until Jul.1899 when she went to Hamburg for scrapping. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P. Bonsor, vol.1, p.460] [Merchant Fleets by Duncan Haws, vol.9, Anchor Line] - [Posted to the ShipsList by Ted Finch - 2 October 1998]

The 1887-88 Lloyd's Register of Shipping has the following details on the Devonia: Call sign: QPRK Official registration #: 76879. Master: Captain H. Young, appointed to the shipping line in 1868 and to the ship in 1879. Rigging: iron single screw steam Bark; 2 iron decks and spar deck, partly iron; 4 tiers of Beams; 6 cemented bulkheads and 1 partial bulkhead. Tonnage: 4,270 tons gross, 4,121 under deck and 2,772 net. Dimensions: 400.3 feet long, 42 foot beam and 25.1 feet in depth. House on deck 149 tons. Built: in 1877 by Barrow Ship Building Co. in Barrow. Propulsion: compound inverted engine with 2 cylinders of 59 and 107 inches diameter respectively. Stroke 48 inches. Operating at 65 p.s.i. pressure. 600 HP. Engine built by the same company as the hull. Owners: Barrow Steam Ships Co. Ltd. Port of registry: Barrow. [Posted to The ShipsList by Gilbert Provost - 2 October 1998]


DEVONIAN
See MAYFLOWER (2).


D. H. WATJEN
The D. H. WATJEN was a 3-masted, square-rigged sailing ship, the first of three vessels of this name, was built by the shipbuilder Johann Lange, of Vegesack/Grohn, for the Bremen firm of D. H. Watjen, and launched on 20 March 1855. 573 Commerzlasten; 57,9 x 11,3 x 6,4 meters (length x beam x depth of hold). Until the early 1860's, under her first captain, Hermann Batjer, the D. H. WATJEN made 2 annual sailings from Bremerhaven to New York, on each voyage carrying from 400 to 500 passengers, returning to Europe with a cargo of tobacco and cotton. In 1859/60, the D. H. WATJEN sailed from Cardiff to Valparaiso with a cargo of coal, returning to New York with a cargo of guano. She then engaged in a regular trans-Atlantic service, sailing from New York to Liverpool, to London, and several times to Genoa. Capt. Batjer was succeeded as master by Adolf Julicher. On her last voyage, the D. H. WATJEN sailed from Livorno to New York with a cargo of marble. On 19 August 1866, the D. H. WATJEN lay at a pier in Jersey City, with a full cargo of tobacco, ready to sail for Genoa, when a vessel loaded with petroleum exploded in her immediate vicinity. The D. H. WATJEN could not be freed from her moorings, and together with the bark FREE TRADE, which was loading a cargo of tobacco for Naples, was engulfed in flames, becoming a total wreck, although part of her cargo was later salvaged in damaged condition. According to the Bremen Weser-Zeitung for 6 October 1866, the damaged tobacco was sold at auction for approximately $13,800. The complete cargo was insured in France "auf offene Police" for 1 million Franks, and would have been insured for 300,000 additional Franks, if the telegraph report of the fire had not arrived before the insured could establish the full value of the cargo [Peter-Michael Pawlik, Von der Weser in die Welt; Die Geschichte der Segelschiffe von Weser und Lesum und ihrer Bauwerften 1770 bis 1893, Schriften des Deutschen Schiffahrtsmuseums, Bd. 33 (Hamburg: Kabel, c1993), p. 227, no. 228]. No picture of the D. H. WATJEN is known to survive. - [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 9 August 1998]


DIADEM
The DIADEM was a sternwheel packet, built at Monongahela, Pennsylvania, in 1860. 154 x 33 x 4.9 ft (length x beam x depth of hold); wood hull. Built for the Pittsburgh-St. Louis trade, Capt.Rogers. Served as a U.S. army transport during the Civil War. Lost in ice at St. Louis, 13 January 1866, Capt. J. Wolff [Frederick Way, Jr., Way's Packet Directory, 1848-1994; Passenger Steamboats of the Mississippi River System Since the Advent of Photography in Mid-Continent America (revised edition; Athens, Ohio: Ohio University Press, 1994)p. 127, packet #1533]. [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 16 December 1997]


DIANA
The British Brig Diana, Alexander Melain Master. There were 250 passengers, the vessel was old and unseaworthy. It was becalmed on the banks of Newfoundland, where the water allowance was reduced to four quarts a day; but there were plenty of cod-fish, and they did not suffer for food. They landed in Quebec, August 3, 1827, 66 days after leaving Belfast. This is all I have concerning this ship. They left Belfast in May of 1827. [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Fran Gamble Pugh - 14 October 1997]


DICKEY SAM
According to the annual volumes of Lloyd's Register for 1841/42-1866/67, the DICKEY SAM was a bark, built in Liverpool, in 1841. 174/305 tons; 101.6 x 24.3 x 16 feet (length x breadth x depth of hold). Master: 1841/42-1842/43 - J. Carter; 1842/43-1848/49 - J. Coaker; 1849/50-1851/52 - Thompson; 1851/52-1852/53 - T. Power; 1853/54-1857/58 - [not given]; 1858/59-1859/60 - J. Watson; 1860/61-1863/64 - W. Lyall; 1863/64-1866/67 - W. Cumming. Owner:1841/42-1850/51 - Thompson; 1851/52-1852/53 - Coubr'gh; 1853/54-1857/58 - Poole & Co.; 1858/59-1860/61 - King & Co.; 1861/62-1866/67 - W. Cumming. Registry:1841/42-1857/58 - Liverpool; 1858/59-1866/67 - Glasgow. Port of Survey: 1841/42-1857/58 - Liverpool; 1858/59-1863/64 - Clydeside; 1863/64-1865/66 - Cardiff; 1865/66-1866/67 - Clydeside. Destined Voyage: 1841/42-1842/43 - Buenos Aires; 1842/43-1844/45 - Rio de Janeiro; 1843/44-1846/47 - Bombay; 1846/47-1848/49 - Batavia; 1848/49-1851/52 - Lima; 1851/52-1852/53 - [not given]; 1853/54-1857/58 - Panama; 1858/59-1859/60 - [not given]; 1860/61-1866/67 - West Indies. On 6 September 1866, the bark DICKEY SAM, carrying a cargo of railway chairs, was stranded 1 mile above the buoy of Shipwash Sand, with the loss of 13 lives [Wrecks, casualties and collisions on the coasts of the United Kingdom during one year occasioning loss of life, chronologically arranged, from the 1st day of January to the 31st day of December 1866, inclusive, Parliamentary Papers 1867 (Command 3902) lxiv.410]. - [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 20 January 1998]


DIVONA
See ORMUZ .


DNESTR
See HOLSATIA.


DOCTOR BARTH
The DOCTOR BARTH was a 3-masted, square-rigged ship, built in Apendrade, Schleswig (now Denmark), in 1853/55, by T. A. Andersen; Bielbrief Apenrade 26 October 1855. 317 Commerzlasten; 51,4 x 8,3 x 5,9 meters (170' x 30' 7" x 21' 5" Hamburg measurement, length x beam x depth of hold). The original owners were Thomas Julius Andersen, son of the builder (2/3), and the Hamburg shipowner Robert Miles Sloman (1/3); Sloman acquired full ownership of the vessel in 1857. In October 1874, Sloman sold the DOCTOR BARTH to Nyholm, in Copenhagen; I have no record of her later history; however, if she was registered with the Bureau Veritas (the Continental equivalent to Lloyd's), it is possible that the Bureau's annual shipping register may contain some later information on her. To determine whether the Bureau Veritas registers contain any later information on the DOCTOR BARTH, contact The Mariners' Museum, 100 Museum Dr., Newport News, VA 23606-3798, which contains the most complete collection of American and foreign ship registers in the United States. Masters:1855-1857 - C. Koch, 1857 - J. H. Niemann, 1858-1868 - H. Meyer, 1869-1874 - C. Bockwoldt. Journeys: 1855/1857 - from Apenrade/intermediate ports/London 1857-1873 - almost exclusively to New York, except a journey in 1857 New York/Hull; 1861/62 New York/Swansea; 1866/67, 1867, 1868/69 New York/Bremerhaven; 1868 New York/Geestemunde; 1870/71 New York/Havre, 1873/1874 - Victoria (Brazil) /Dona Francisca. Sources: Walter Kresse, ed., Seeschiffs-Verzeichnis der Hamburger Reedereien, 1824-1888, Mitteilungen aus dem Museum fur Hamburgische Geschichte, N. F., Bd. 5. (Hamburg: Museum fur Hamburgische Geschichte, 1969), Bd. 2, p. 211; Ernst Hieke, Rob. M. Sloman Jr., Errichtet 1793, Veroffentlichungen der Wirtschaftsgeschichtlichen Forschungsstelle e.V., Hamburg, Bd. 30 (Hamburg: Verlag Hanseatischer Merkur, 1968), p. 374. [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 21 November 1997]


DOCTOR KANE
The DOCTOR KANE was a bark, built under special survey by William Power, in Quebec, in 1857. 609 (readmeasured 607, in 1863) tons; 157 x 29.3 x 18.2 feet (length x beam x depth of hold). Official No.: 33335. She was transferred from the Quebec to the Londonderry registry in 1859 (Quebec registry closed 28 June 1859). Lloyd's Register for 1859-1869 contains the following additional information on her: Master: 1859 - not given; 1860-1862 - J. M'Cay; 1862-1869 - S. Milligan. Owner: J. & J. Cooke. Port of Registry: Londonderry. Port of Survey: 1859 - Liverpool; 1860-1869 - Clydeside. Intended Destination: 1859 - North America; 1860-1862 - Quebec; 1862-1869 - West Indies. Lloyd's Register for 1870 contains no reference to the DOCTOR KANE, which was last surveyed in December 1862. I do not know anything of her later history, although there may be some information in Eileen Marcil, The Charley-Man: a history of wooden shipbuilding at Quebec, 1763-1893 (Kingston, Ontario: Quarry Press, 1993). For lists of passengers that sailed on the DOCTOR KANE during her years in the Irish-Canadian service, see Brian Mitchell, comp., Irish Passenger Lists, 1847-1871; Lists of Passengers Sailing from Londonderry to America on Ships of the J. & J. Cooke Line and the McCorkell Line (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., 1988). [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 8 December 1997]


DOMINION (1)
The first "Dominion" was built by A.McMillan & Son, Dumbarton (engines by J.Jack, Rollo & Co, Liverpool) in 1873 for the Dominion Line of Liverpool. This was a 3,176 gross ton ship, length 335ft x beam 38.4ft, straight stem, one funnel, three masts, iron construction, single screw and a speed of 11 knots. There was accommodation for 130-cabin class and 600-3rd class passengers. Launched on 22/11/1873, she sailed from Liverpool on her maiden voyage to Quebec and Montreal on 6/5/1874. On 11/7/1885 she commenced her first Avonmouth - Quebec - Montreal voyage and in 1890 was fitted with triple expansion engines. She was sold to E.Thirkell & Co (British) in 1895 and on 4/1/1896 was wrecked at Castletown Berehaven, Ireland. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P. Bonsor, vol.2, p.804-5] - [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 4 May 1998]

The Lloyd's Register of Shipping lists in 1887-88: Call sign: NBLW Official registration #: 69342. Master: Captain T. Hunter. Rigging: iron single screw steam Bark; 3 decks and awning deck; 5 bulkheads cemented. Some repairs to the ship in 1878. Tonnage: 3,176 tons gross, 1,590 under deck and 2,032 net. Dimensions: 335 feet long, 38.4 foot beam and 25.7 feet deep. Built: in 1873 by A. McMillian & Sons in Dumbarton. Propulsion: compound inverted engine with 2 cylinders of 47 and 84 inches diameter respectively; stroke 45 inches. Operating at 65 p.s.i.. 300 horsepower. Engine built by J. Jack, Rollo & Co. in Liverpool. Owners: Mississippi & Dominion Steam Shipping Co. Port of registry: Liverpool. - [Posted to The ShipsList by Gilbert Provost - 13 October 1998]


DOMINION (2)
The "Dominion" of 1899 was built in 1893 by Harland & Wolff of Belfast as the "Prussia" for the German Hamburg - America Line. She was a 5965 gross ton ship, length 445.5ft x beam 50.2ft, one funnel, four masts, twin screw and a speed of 14 knots. Accommodation for 60-1st class and 1,800-3rd class passengers. She was launched on 10/11/1893 but her completion was delayed by a strike (they even had them in those days!) and she didn't leave Hamburg on her maiden voyage to Havre and New York until 24/6/1894. She stayed on this service until her last voyage on 6/2/1898 when she was sold to the British Dominion Line and renamed "Dominion". She was rebuilt with a tonnage of 6618 tons and accommodation for 200-1st, 170-2nd, and 750-3rd class passengers and commenced sailing Liverpool - Quebec - Montreal on 7/5/1898. In 1908 she went to the American Line, was further altered to carry 370-2nd and 750-3rd class passengers and was put onto their Liverpool - Philadelphia service until May 1915. She did some intervening Dominion Line sailings and in 1918 did her first voyage after the Armistice from Liverpool - Portland on 2/12/1918. In autumn 1919 she was used as a cargo ship only and on 26/2/1921 she made her last trip from Liverpool - Portland and was scrapped in Germany in 1922. [ North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.1, p.400, vol.2, p.809] [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Ted Finch - 16 August 1997]


DON
See FURST BISMARCK.


DON ALVARO DE BAZAN
See GALLIA (1) .


DONA MARIA
The "Dona Maria" was built by Wigham Richardson & Co, Walker-on-Tyne. She was a 2,539 gross ton ship, length 330ft x beam 38.3ft, one funnel, three masts, single screw and a speed of 11 knots. There was accommodation for 50-1st and 700-3rd class passengers. Launched on 18th Oct.1887 as the "Port Fairy" for the Anglo-Australasian Steam Navigation Co of Newcastle, she sailed from London on her maiden voyage to Melbourne and Sydney on 2nd Jan.1888. After this one voyage, she was sold to the Portuguese owned Andresen Line and renamed "Dona Maria". Her first voyage for these owners started on 19th Nov.1892 when she left Lisbon for the Azores and New York. She started her last sailing on this service when she left Oporto for Lisbon, Azores and New York on 21st Nov.1903. In 1907 she was sold to the Booth Line of Liverpool, resumed her original name of "Port Fairy", and was employed on the Liverpool - River Amazon ports service. Sold to Ellerman Lines in 1909 and renamed "Italian", she was finally scrapped at Preston in 1913. [North Star to Southern Cross by John M.Maber] [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P. Bonsor, vol.3, p.1196] [South Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor] - [Posted to The Ships List by Ted Finch - 28 August 1998]


DONAU (1)
DONAU, Heydtmann, master, which arrived at New York on 16 May 1854, 36 days from Hamburg. This vessel, described in 1853 as a bark, and in 1854 and later as a ship, was built in Altona (now part of Hamburg, but then a port in the kingdom of Hannover) in 1853 by Dreyer for the Hamburg-Amerikanische Paketfahrt-Aktiengesellschaft (Hamburg American Line). 237 Commerzlasten (1 Commerzlast = 2,806.266 kilograms), measurement "zwischen den Steven" 139.6 x 31 x 19.6 (length x width x depth of hold) Hamburg feet (1 Hamburg foot = .28657 meters). She sailed almost exclusively on the Hamburg-New York route, although she also sailed to Charleston, SC, in 1858/59 and 1859/60, to London in 1861, to Hull in 1861 and 1862, and to Philadelphia in 1865. In 1866, she was sold, after having been damaged at sea, to Hall, of Boston, and sailed to Port Louis, Mauritius, as the DRESDEN [Walter Kresse, Seeschiffs-Verzeichnis der Hamburger Reedereien 1824-1888, Teil 1, Mitteilungen aus dem Museum fur Hamburgische Geschichte, N.F., 5 (Hamburg: Museum fur Hamburgische Geschichte, 1969). I know nothing of her later history, although she may be listed in Lloyd's Register of North American Shipping. There may be additional information on her, including a picture, in Arnold Kludas and Herbert Bischoff, Die Schiffe der Hamburg-Amerika-Linie, Bd. 1: 1847-1906 (Herford: Koehler, 1979). Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 27 July 1997]


DONAU (2)
The "Donau" of 1883 was an iron built steamer, built by Caird & Co, Greenock for Norddeutscher Lloyd [North German Lloyd] in 1868. She was 2896 gross tons, length 332ft x beam 40ft, clipper stem, one funnel, two masts, single screw and a speed of 13 knots. There was accommodation for 60-1st and 700-3rd class passengers. Launched on 17/10/1868, she left Bremen on 16/1/1869 for her maiden voyage to Southampton and New York. In 1877 her engines were compounded and her last voyage Bremen - New York commenced 16/1/1887. Last voyage Bremen - Baltimore commenced 25/9/1889 and she was then sold to another German company. On 16/3/1895 she was abandoned and burnt out in the North Atlantic. Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Ted Finch]

The steamship DONAU was built by Caird & Co, Greenock (ship #147), for Norddeutscher Lloyd, and launched on 17 October 1868. 2,897 tons; 106,15 x 12,229 meters (length x breadth); clipper bow, 1 funnel, 2 masts; iron construction, screw propulsion, service speed 12-13 knots; accommodation for 60 1st-class and 700 steerage-class passengers; crew of ca. 90-105. 16 January 1869, maiden voyage, Bremen-Southampton-New York. 1877, engines compounded by builders. 16 January 1887, last voyage, Bremen-New York. 25 September 1889, last voyage, Bremen- Baltimore. 21 October 1889, sold to H. Bischoff, Bremen; rebuilt as a freighter. 16 March 1895, bound from Hamburg to Philadelphia, destroyed by fire at ca. 31 N 20 W; all aboard were saved by the British steamship DELAWARE [Edwin Drechsel, Norddeutscher Lloyd Bremen, 1857-1970; History, Fleet, Ship Mails, vol. 1 (Vancouver: Cordillera Pub. Co., c1994, p.. 50; ; Noel Reginald Pixell Bonsor, North Atlantic Seaway; An Illustrated History of the Passenger Services Linking the Old World with the New (2nd ed.; Jersey, Channel Islands: Brookside Publications), vol. 2 (1978), p. 546]. Pictured in Michael J. Anuta, Ships of Our Ancestors (Menominee, MI: Ships of Our Ancestors, 1983), p. 82, courtesy of the Peabody Essex Museum, East India Square, Salem, MA 01970 - [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 11 February 1998]

The Lloyd's Register of Shipping for 1887-88 gives the following details: DONAU - Call sign: QBKH. Master: Captain Pohle. Rigging: iron single screw steam Brig. Tonnage: 2,896 tons gross and 1,771 net. Dimensions: 347.8 feet long, 40 foot beam and 33.5 feet deep. Built: 1868 by Caird & Co. in Greenock. Propulsion: compound engine with 2 cylinders of 60 and 100 in. diameter respectively; Stroke 54 inches; 600 horsepower; engine built by the same company as the hull. Owners: Norddeutscher Lloyd. Port of registry: Bremen.

N.R.P. Bonsor in Vol. 2 of his North Atlantic Seaway says the following: DONAU: Iron single screw steamer with clipper bow, 1 funnel and 2 masts. 2,896 tons gross and 332 feet long with 40 foot beam. Engine with two inverted cylinders given her a service speed of 13 knots. She had accommodation for 60 passengers in First Class and 700 in Third Class. She was launched on Oct. 17, 1868. She made her maiden voyage from Bremen to Southampton to New York on Jan. 16, 1869. In 1877 her builders, Caird & Co. compounded her engine. On Jan. 16, 1887 she made her last voyage between Bremen and New York. On Sept. 25, 1889 she made a last voyage between Bremen and Baltimore. On March 16, 1895, she was destroyed by fire in the North Atlantic and was abandoned. - [Posted to The ShipsList by Gilbert Provost - 3 November 1998]


DONEGAL
The British brig DONEGAL (Official Number 33717, International Signal Code R.G.L.S.) was built in Belfast in 1808. The annual volmes of Lloyd's Register of Shipping for 1812, 1820, and 1834/35-1876/77 contain the following information on her: Tonnage: 1812 - 200; 1820 - 194; 1834/35-1852/53 - 196; 1853/54-1859/60 - 190/196; 1860/61-1874/75 - 174/196; 1875/76-1876/77 - 142/196. Master: 1812 - Courtney; 1820 - Gowan; 1834/35-1836/37 - J. Matches; 1836/37-1852/53 - J. Hodgson; 1853/54-1859/60 - R. Dixon; 1860/61 - W. Clark; 1861/62-1862/63 - Irvine; 1862/63-1864/65 - Wiltshire; 1864/65-1876/77 - Crossley. Owner: 1812, 1820 - G. Langtry; 1834/35-1835/36 - [not given]; 1836/37-1876/77 - Hodgson. Port of Registry: 1812, 1820 - [not given]; 1834/35-1836/37 - Whitehaven; 1836/37-1852/53 - Maryport; 1853/54-1876/77 - Whitehaven. Port of Survey: 1812 - London; 1820 - Belfast; 1834/35-1835/36 - [not given]; 1836/37-1840/41 - Maryport; 1840/41-1842/43 - Whitehaven; 1842/43-1843/44 - Liverpool; 1844/45-1859/60 - Whitehaven; 1860/61 - Marypoart; 1861/62-1876/77 - Whitehaven. Destined Voyage (-1873/74): 1812 - Belfast; 1820 - London; 1834/35-1835/36 - [not given]; 1836/37-1840/41 - North America; 1840/41-1842/43 - Dublin; 1842/43-1843/44 - Newfoundland; 1844/45-1845/46 - [not given]; 1846/47-1847/48 - Dublin; 1848/49-1850/51 - North America; 1851/52-1852/53 - coaster; 1853/54-1854/55 - Quebec; 1844/45-1859/60 - [not given]; 1860/61-1873/74 - coaster. The 1812 and 1820 volumes of Lloyd's Register also indicate that the DONEGAL had a single deck with beams, and that she drew 15 feet of water when fully loaded. Lloyd's Register for 1876/77 contains the notation "lost". However, the event may have occurred some time before 1876/77, as the DONEGAL appears to have been last surveyed in May 1865. Fortunately, the National Maritime Museum (NMM), Greenwich, London SE10 9NF,, has among its collections wreck registers maintained by the Board of Trade from 1855, in accordance with the Merchant Shipping Act of 1854. The NMM is your best possible source for additional information on the history and ultimate fate of the DONEGAL, as well as for information on any surviving pictorial representations of her. - [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 10 February 1998]


DONGEDYK
See DELFTDYKE.


DONLINSK
See PRINZ EITEL FREIDRICH (1)


DON MATIAS
See VALPARAISO (2) .


DORETTE
According to Peter-Michael Pawlik, Von der Weser in die Welt; Die Geschichte der Segelschiffe von Weser und Lesum und ihrer Bauwerften 1770 bis 1893, Schriften des Deutschen Schiffahrtsmuseums, Bd. 33 (Hamburg: Kabel, c1993), pp. 279-280, the bark DORETTE was built by Hermann Friedrich Ulrichs, in Vegesack, for the firm of Carl Pokrantz & Co. , Bremen, and was launched on 3 November 1855. 242 Commerzlasten/503 tons register; 40,5 x 9,0 x 5,1 meters (length x beam x depth of hold); International Signal Code: QBLS. Her captains were: Joh. Grabau, Vegesack; Joh. Hinr. Getjen, Bremen (1860); Cord Gustavus, Vegesack (1861); B. Schumacher, Bremen (1863); LFCder Schulken, Bremen (1864). The vessel was primarily engaged in the transatlantic freight and passenger service. [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 15 November 1997]


DOVER CASTLE
I have very little on the "Dover Castle", only that she was owned by Shaw Savill & Co, and was built in 1858 as a wooden barque of 1,003 tons [The Colonial Clippers by Basil Lubbock] [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 13 December 1997]

The annual volumes of Lloyd's Register of Shipping for the years 1858/59-1881/82 indicate that the DOVER CASTLE was a three-masted vessel, originally rigged as a ship, but re-rigged in late 1874/early 1875 as a bark, built under special survey at Sunderland in 1858. Official number 20847; signal code N.C.T.R. 1003/1003/881 tons (gross/net/under-deck); 185 x 34 x 22 feet (length x beam x depth of hold); poop deck 73 feet long, forecastle 30 feet long. She was owned first by R. Green (presumably of the firm of Richard & Henry Green, shipbuilders and owners of Blackwall, London) (1858/59-1871/72), then by Shaw, Savill & Co (1871/72-1880/81), then by C. Y. Boe, of Arendal, Norway, who changed her name to KEM (1880/81-1881/82). Master: 1858/59-1861/62 - Adams; 1861/62-1864/65 - Ayles; 1864/65-1870/71 - R. Deacon; 1870/71-1872/73 - W. F. Owen; 1872/73-1874/75 - R. Kerr; 1874/75-1880/81 - A. Culbert; 1880/81-1881/82 - not given. Port of Registry: 1858/59-1880/81 - London; 1880/81-1881/82 - Arendal. Port of Survey: 1858/59-1881/82 - London. Destined Voyage (omitted from the Register after 1873/74): 1858/59-1859/60 - not given; 1860/61-1870/71 - Australia; 1870/71-1871/72 - India; 1871/72-1873/74 - not given. I do not know the later history of ultimate fate of the KEM, late DOVER CASTLE. For further information on the DOVER CASTLE, check David macGregor, Merchant Sailing Ships, 1850-1875 (London: Conway Maritime Press, 1985), and contact the Australian National Maritime Museum in Sydney, which has an excellent collection of sources for the history of sailing vessels to Australia, and whose Pathfinder No.2: Immigration Sailing Ships, is a particularly useful research guide. For surviving accounts of voyages to Australia on board the DOVER CASTLE, check Ian Hawkins Nicholson, Log of logs : a catalogue of logs, journals, shipboard diaries, letters, and all forms of voyage narratives, 1788 to 1988, for Australia and New Zealand and surrounding oceans, Roebuck Society Publication Nos. 41, 47 (2 vols; Yaroomba, Qld: The Author jointly with the Australian Association for Maritime History, [1990]-1993). [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 16 December 1997]


DOVER CASTLE (2)
The "Dover Castle" was a 8,271 gross ton ship, built in 1904 by Barclay Curle, & Co, Glasgow for the Union Castle Mail SS Co. Her details were - length 475ft x beam 56ft, single funnel, twin screws and a speed of 14 knots. There was accommodation for 220-1st and 250-3rd class passengers. There was also capacity to carry about 300 passengers in open-berth accommodation. She was used on the UK - South Africa service until converted to a hospital ship for the Great War. Torpedoed and sunk by the German submarine UC.67 on 26th May 1917, with 632 patients, while 50 miles north of Bona. [The Cape Run by W.H.Mitchell & L.A.Sawyer] - [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 21 May 1998]


DRACHENSTEIN
See CASSANDRA.


DRAFNA
The Drafna was owned by Hans Ki?r & Co in Drammen. Master was Hartvig Eckersberg. She had a burden of 185,5 Norwegian Kommerselester, measures: 102,5 x 27,2 x 17,8. Drafna is said to have been a very solid built ship.When Drafna ones hit solid rock, and was stuck, the insurance company wanted to send down a diver to check for damages. One of the owners them said that they would be welcome to do so, if they wanted to se if the rock had been damaged. Agents were shipbroker Bang in Drammen, and the ship captain. Drafna was used for freight of timber from Canada. Condemned in Queenstown in 1890 on passage from Quebec to Liverpool with timber. Drafna sailed in 1849, 1850, 1852 and 1853 with emigrants from Norway to America. It is possible that she also made a crossing with passengers in 1848. [From The Solem and Swiggum Ship Index - [E-mail from Ann Helgeson - 9 June 1998]


DRAGO
See H.H. MEIER.


DRESDEN (1)
(of 1866) See DONAU.


DRESDEN (2)
The "Dresden" of 1888 was the first of two ships with this name owned by Norddeutscher Lloyd (North German Lloyd). She was built by Fairfield Co. Ltd, Glasgow in 1888 and was a 4,527 gross ton ship, length 390.5ft x beam 46.7ft, one funnel, two masts, single screw and a speed of 13 knots. Passenger accommodation for 38-1st, 20-2nd and 1,759-3rd class. Launched on 1/12/1888, she sailed from Bremen on her maiden voyage to Baltimore on 10/4/1889. On 29/5/1889 she transferred to the Bremen - Suez Canal - Far East route for one round voyage and on 30/12/1889 went onto the Bremen - South America service. On 9/7/1890 she started a single round voyage from Bremen to Suez and Australia and on 18/5/1892 commenced sailings from Bremen to New York. Started her last Bremen - Baltimore voyage on 15/5/1902 and on 15/11/1902 commenced her last Bremen - S.America sailing (5 Round voyages). Her last Bremen - New York - Baltimore voyage commenced on 12/5/1903 (19 N.Atlantic round voyages). In 1903 she went to Houston Line and was renamed "Helius" and in 1904 went to Union Castle Line and was laid up. In 1906 she was sold to Turkey and was renamed "Tirimujghian" and in 1914 was sunk by the Russians in the Black Sea. [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 15 November 1997]


DROMAHAIR
The DROMAHAIR was not a ship but a bark, a 3-masted vessel, the fore- and mainmasts square-rigged, the mizzenmast (the mast closest the stern) rigged fore-and-aft, 353/376 tons (old/new measurement), built at New Brunswick in 1841. She is listed in Lloyd's Register of Shipping for 1843/44 through 1858/59: Master: 1843/44-1854/55 - P[atrick] Pyne; 1855/56-1856/57 - Richards; 1857/58 - A. Plaine; 1858/59 - J. Gill. Owner: 1843/44-1849/50 - Kernagh[a]n; 1850/51-1858/59 - Pyne & Co. Port of Registry: Sligo. Port of Survey: 1843/44-1844/45 - Clydeside; 1844/45-1846/47 - London; 1846/47-1849/49 - Clydeside; 1849/50 - [not given]; 1850/51 - Clydeside; 1851/52 - Dublin; 1852/53-1854/55 - Clydeside; 1855/56-1856/57 - Sligo; 1857/58-1858/59 - Clydeside. Destined Voyage: 1843/44-1844/45 - Montreal; 1844/45-1846/47 - North America; 1846/47-1848/49 - New York; 1849/50 - [not given]; 1850/51 - New York; 1851/52 - Quebec; 1852/53-1854/55 - New York; 1855/56-1858/59 - Quebec. The DROMAHAIR last appears in Lloyd's Register for 1858/59, without any indication of her fate. - [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 29 March 1998]


DROTTNINGHOLM
See VIRGINIAN.


DUCA D'AOSTA
The "Duca d'Aosta" belonged to NGI. She was built by Cantieri Navale Siciliani, Palermo and launched on 29/9/1908. Her dimensions were 7804 gross tons, length 144,77m x beam 16,24m, two funnels, two masts, twin screw and a speed of 16 knots. Passenger accommodation for 66-1st, 122-2nd and 1,740-3rd class passengers. She commenced her maiden voyage from Genoa to Naples and New York on 9/11/1909 and her last voyage on this run on 20/11/1912. On 30/12/1912 she commenced sailing from Genoa to the River Plate and on 7/7/1914 resumed the Genoa - Naples - New York service. Her last voyage on this run started on 20/6/1921 and she then went back to the S.American service. Scrapped in 1929. [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Ted Finch - 15 September 1997]


DUCA DEGLI ABRUZZI
The "Duca Degli Abruzzi" was built by Cantieri Navale Riuniti, Spezia for the Italian company Navigazione Generale Italiana. She was a 7793 gross ton vessel, length 475.8ft x beam 53.4ft, two funnels, two masts, twin screw, and a speed of 16 knots. She had accommodation for 80-1st, 16-2nd and 1,740-3rd class passengers. Launched on 5/5/1907, she left Genoa on her maiden voyage for Naples and New York on 4/2/1908. She stayed on the Mediterranean - New York service until leaving Naples for New York on her last voyage on this service on 22/11/1911 and was then used as an Italian Auxiliary Cruiser until 2/10/1912 and was then transferred to the South America run ( Genoa - River Plate service). On 11/10/1914 she resumed the Genoa - Naples - New York service until her last run leaving Genoa on 20/1/1916. I have no knowledge of her between then and 28/11/1918 when she resumed service New York - Genoa. (she may well have been laid up during this period). On 23/5/1922 she sailed from Genoa on her last voyage to Naples - Messina - New York and spent the rest of her career on the S.American run. She was scrapped in 1929. There is a picture of her sister ship "Duca d'Aosta" in North Atlantic Seaway Vol.3, p.1104. by NRP Bonsor. 1929. [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Ted Finch - 15 September 1997]


DUCA DI GENOVA
The "Duca di Genova" was a 7,893 gross ton ship, built by Cantieri Navale Riuniti, Spezia (engines by N.Odero & Co, Sestri Ponente) in 1907 for Navigazione Generale Italiana. Her details were - length 475.8ft x beam 53.4ft, two funnels, two masts, twin screw and a speed of 16 knots. There was accommodation for 80-1st, 16-2nd and 1,740-3rd class passengers. Launched on 8/9/1907, she sailed from Genoa on her maiden voyage to Naples and New York on 18/10/1908. She commenced her last round voyage on this service on 29/10/1912 and was then transferred to the Italian company, La Veloce. She was used mainly on the Genoa - South America service, but started a single Genoa - Palermo - Naples - New York round voyage on 27/9/1914. In 1915 she made a further sailing on this route and in 1916 made two N.Atlantic voyages, the last one starting on 11/9/1916. She was then used as an Italian troopship until 6/2/1918 when she was torpedoed and sunk in the Mediterranean by the German submarine U.64 near Cape Canet, France. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P. Bonsor, vol.3, p.1118] - [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 8 June 1998]


DUCHESS OF BEDFORD
The "Duchess of Bedford" was built by John Brown & Co Ltd, Glasgow in 1928 for Canadian Pacific SS Ltd. She was a 20,123 gross ton ship, length 601ft x beam 75.2ft, two funnels, two masts, twin screw and a speed of 18 knots. There was passenger accommodation for 580-cabin, 480-tourist and 510-3rd class. Launched on 24/1/1928 by Mrs Stanley Baldwin, the wife of the British prime minister, she sailed from Liverpool on her maiden voyage to Quebec and Montreal on 1/6/1928. On her second westbound crossing, she set a new record of six days, nine and a half hours from Liverpool to Montreal. In July 1933 she was in collision with an iceberg in Belle Isle Strait, but sustained only slight damage. Five days before the declaration of war in 1939, she was chartered for a trooping voyage to Bombay, and on 5/1/1940 resumed Liverpool - St John NB - Halifax voyages, being used on the Eastbound crossings to ferry Canadian troops to Britain. In August 1940 she commenced the first of three voyages to Suez via Freetown and Cape Town. In November 1941 she left Liverpool on a 5 month voyage which took her to Singapore with 4000 Indian troops and 40 nurses. Arriving at the end of January 1942, she embarked 875 women and children for evacuation to Batavia, Java. Although attacked on several occasions, she was not seriously damaged, and arrived at Liverpool on 2/4/1942. After two trips to Cape Town, she sailed from Liverpool for Boston on 7/8/1942 and on 9th August, sighted a U-Boat and sank her by gunfire. She was later used in the North African landings and shot down an enemy aircraft in November 1943. Later used in the Sicily and Salerno landings and various trooping voyages, and prisoner of war repatriations. On 3/3/1947 she arrived at Glasgow to be refitted to carry 400-1st and 300-tourist class passengers, her speed increased to 20 knots, and was renamed "Empress of France" in October 1947. She resumed Liverpool - Quebec - Montreal sailings on 1/9/1948 and in 1958 was fitted with new streamlined funnels and her accommodation altered to carry 218-1st and 482-tourist class passengers. She started her last Montreal - Liverpool crossing on 30/11/1960 having made 310 round voyages on the North Atlantic, and on 19/12/1960 sailed from Liverpool for Newport, Monmouthshire where she was scrapped. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P. Bonsor, vol.3, p.1317-18][Canadian Pacific - 100 years by George Musk] - [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 4 April 1998]


DUILIO
The "Duilio" was laid down in 1914, but, due to the war, was not launched until 1916 and did not sail on her maiden voyage to New York until 1923. She was built by G. Ansaldo & Co, Sestri Ponente, Italy for Navigazione Generale Italiana. Her dimensions were 24,281 gross tons, length 602.4ft x beam 76.3ft, two funnels, two masts, four screws and a speed of 19 knots. There was accommodation for 280-1st, 670-2nd, and 600-3rd class passengers. Launched on 9/1/1916, she left Genoa on 29/10/1923 on her maiden voyage to Naples and New York and sailed on her last run on this service on 24/7/1928, when she was transferred to the South America service. In 1932, she went to the Italia Line and was transferred to the South Africa run in 1933. In 1937 she went to Lloyd Triestino and on 10/7/1944 was bombed and sunk at Trieste. Refloated in 1948 and scrapped. [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Ted Finch]


DUKE OF BUCKINGHAM
The "Duke of Buckingham", built in 1880 for the Ducal Line by Barrow Shipbuilding Co, Barrow. She was a 3,123 gross ton ship, length 384ft x beam 38.3ft, one funnel, four masts, iron construction, single screw and a speed of 11 knots. She sailed from London on her first voyage to Suez, Batavia, Brisbane and Newcastle, NSW on 4th December 1882 and stayed on this joint service with British India Stem Nav. Co until 1886. In December 1886 she was chartered to the Huntington Line and sailed between London, Havre and Newport News(arrived 13/1/1887). In Feb.1887 she started her first Liverpool - Newport News voyage and made her last sailing on this service in March 1888 (arr. Newport News 3rd April). She then went back to the Australia route and made her last sailing to Brisbane on 25/8/1900. In 1900 she was sold to Macbeth & Grey and in 1902 was resold to Italian owners. She was broken up at Genoa in July 1903.[orth Star to Southern Cross by John M.Maber, p.171-176] [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P. Bonsor, vol.3, p.1174-5] - [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 22 April 1998]


DUKE OF WESTMINSTER
The "Duke of Westminster" was built in 1882 by the Barrow Shipbuilding Co, Barrow for the Ducal Line. She was a 3,726 gross ton ship, length 400ft x beam 40.3ft (121,91m x 12,28m), one funnel, four masts, single screw and a speed of 12 knots. There was accommodation for 40-1st class, plus 3rd class passengers. Launched on 27th April 1882, she was used for the joint service with British India Steam Nav.Co between London, Suez, Batavia and Brisbane. She started her first voyage on this service on 2/7/1883 and her last on 26/6/1902. Between 1886-88 she was chartered to the Huntington Line and made several voyages between London or Liverpool and Newport News. In 1903 she was sold to Italian owners, renamed "Westminster" and was scrapped at Genoa in September 1903. [North Star to Southern Cross by John M.Maber, p.171-176] [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P. Bonsor, vol.3, p.1174] - [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 22 April 1998]


DUNBAR CASTLE
The "Dunbar Castle" (named after a castle in East Lothian) was built in 1930 by Harland & Wolff, Govan for the Union Castle Mail SS Co. She was a 10,002 gross ton ship, two funnels and two masts and was employed on the London - round Africa service, in which some ships sailed out via Suez and home via the Cape and some in the reverse direction. She was sunk by a magnetic mine on 9th January 1940, two miles East of the Goodwin Sands while on passage from London to Beira. She was the first war loss of the company. [The Cape Run by W.H.Mitchell & L.A.Sawyer] [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 8 December 1997]

Shipwreck Index of the British Isles (Richard & Bridget Larn:pub Lloyds Reg of Shipping) has to say about The wreck of the Dunbar Castle:
"Outward bound in convoy, she detonated a magnetic mine which went off right beneath her bridge, causing her to founder in 30 minutes. The convoy was passing through a swept channel at the time, HM minesweeper Calvi, working off the North Foreland, went to her rescue. They picked up two lifeboats of survivors, 73 in total, including four women, two of whom were nuns, some children all completely naked, and members of the crew. Captain Causton was seriously injured in the explosion and was found dead in one of the lifeboats, another man was in such a severe state of shock that he refused to leave the lifeboat, continuing to sit in a stupor until he died. The crew of the Calvi handed out tots of rum until they ran out, when a coastal motor barge arrived on the scene and took off the survivors and landed them at Ramsgate. HMS Calvi brought in both lifeboats which were sold at Dover for 14 pounds. Her cargo consisted of 4,400 tons of automatic scales, spoons, gin, herrings etc. The wreck was dispersed by explosives in 1959, her remains lie in 18m depth, standing 3m above the seabed."
The convoy records, which will probably hold details of the incident including the Board of Trade enquiry (and therefore probably eye witness accounts) are open to the public. There have been several postings recently by people whose relatives sailed on British owned troop ships in WWll and they might like to know that all the convoy records are held at the Public Record Office.. [Posted to The ShipsList by Debbie Beavis - 8 December 1997]


DUNERA
The "Dunera" was built as a troopship by Barclay Curle & Co, Glasgow in 1937. She was a 12,620 gross ton ship, length 517ft x beam 63ft, one funnel, two masts, diesel engines and twin screws. Managed by British India Steam Navigation Co, she was occasionaly used before the war for passenger cruises during the summer months to Northern capitals. In 1940 she was used to bring Australian and New Zealand troops to Suez and in 1942 was involved with the invasion of Madagascar. In 1943 she took part in the Sicily landings and in 1944 carried the US headquarters staff for the landings near Cannes in southern France. After the war, she continued on trooping duties to Malaya and in 1950-51 was used for the Korean war. In 1956 she was involved in the Suez crisis when the Suez Canal was nationalised. She was released from trooping in 1961, being replaced by the new "Oxfordshire" and "Nevasa" as well as air travel. She was then refitted for use as a schools' educational cruise ship and painted white. In 1967 she was scrapped at Bilbao. [Taken from Ships Monthly magazine article by R.G.Robertson, July - December 1990] There are excellent photos of this ship in Shipping Monthly, July 1990 and December 1991 - [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 5 April 1998]


DUNOLLY CASTLE
See IOANNINA .


DWINSK
The "Dwinsk" was built by Harland & Wolff, Belfast in 1897 as the third "Rotterdam" for the Holland America Line. She was an 8,302 gross ton ship, length 470.3ft x beam 53.2ft, one funnel, two masts, twin screw and a speed of 14 knots. There was passenger accommodation for 200-1st, 150-2nd and 2,000-3rd class. Launched on 18/2/1897, she sailed from Rotterdam on her maiden voyage to Boulogne and New York on 18/8/1897. She started her last voyage on this service on 17/2/1906 and then went to the Scandinavian American Line and was renamed "C.F.Tietgen". See the Norwegian emigration site . On 26/4/1906 she commenced her first Copenhagen - Christiania (Oslo) - Christiansand - New York voyage and started her last voyage on this service on 6/11/1913. She then went to the Russian American Line, was renamed "Dwinsk" and commenced sailings between Libau and New York on 10/2/1914. Her last voyage on this service started 28/7/1914 and she transferred to Archangel - Hammerfest - New York sailings on 20/9/1914. In 1917 she was put under Cunard management and sailed under the British flag until 18/6/1918 when she was torpedoed and sunk by the German submarine U.151, 400 miles from Bermuda. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.3, p.1356] - [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 16 February 1998]


E

EARL OF SEFTON
From my own databases which includes references from St. John Ships and Their Builders by Esther Clark Wright, I have the following on EARL OF SEFTON: Year - 1854. Name - EARL OF SEFTON. Rig - ship. Tons - 1082. Builder - John McDonald & Co Liverpool. Disposal - 1854. Remarks Built in 1854 by John McDonald & Co. in St. John New Brunswick in 1854 sold to Charles Moore and Robert Carlyle in Liverpool in 1854, she was wrecked in 1859. Also from Frederick W. Wallace, the following information Vessel Name: EARL OF SEFTON. Rigging : ship. Tonnage : 1126. Length : 179.50. Beadth: 32.20. Depth : 22.10. Date Built : 1854. Location Built.: St. John. Province Built : New Brunswick. Country Built: Canada. Builder's Name : J.McDonald. Reason Closed : sold. Date Closed : 1855. Place Closed : Liverpool. Data Source: Frederick W. Wallace - Record of Canadian Shipping 1786-1920 [Posted to The ShipsList by Gery Swiggum - 12 February 1998]


EASTERN PRINCE (of 1896)
See PRINCE LINE FREIGHTERS


EASTLAND
EASTLAND, Year: 1915-07-24, Cause: Capsized. Water ballast error Region. Lake Michigan, Chicago at Chicago River, Clark Street, Cargo: Passengers GTon: 1961, Length 269 Ft., Width: 36 ft. Draft 14 ft. Captain: Harry Pedersen, Lost 835/2500? Built, Port Huron, MI Owner St. Jos-Chicago SS. References: Northern Shipwrecks Databaseby David N. Barron; Principal Marine Disasters 1831-1932, US Coast Guard, US Govt Printing Office, 1952; Shipwrecks of the Lakes, Dana Thomas Bowen, 1952; Lore of the Lakes, Dana Thomas Bowen, 1940; Great Lakes Shipwrecks & Survivals, William Ratigan, 1960, Galahad Books, New York. - [Posted to The ShipsList by Gery Swiggum - 6 February 1998]


EBERHARD
The EBERHARD was a bark--a 3-masted sailing vessel, square rigged on the fore and main masts and rigged fore-and-aft on the mizzen mast--built by the shipwright Johann Lange, of Vegesack/Grohn, for the Bremen firm of Gebruder Focke, and launched on 20 November 1847. 275 Commerzlasten/616 tons; 37,3 x 9,8 x 5,8 meters (length x beam x depth of hold). Masters of the EBERHARD were, in order, Chr. Treviranus, C. F. Wiegmeyer (1852), Christian Geerken (1856), and, again, C. F. Wiegmeyer (1858). In 1862, the EBERHARD was sold to H. Houen, of Skien, Norway, and the vessel renamed SKIEN. In the 1880's, the vessel was registered to Niels P. Hoyer, Skien. Lloyd's Wreck Returns for 1898 contains the following reference to her end: Sailed from Brevig on 22nd March; wreckage belonging to vessel passed near Dudgeon Lightvessel on 31st March; no later news. Source: Peter-Michael Pawlik, Von der Weser in die Welt; Die Geschichte der Segelschiffe von Weser und Lesum und ihrer Bauwerften 1770 bis 1893, Schriften des Deutschen Schiffahrtsmuseums, Bd. 33 (Hamburg: Kabel, c1993), pp. 213-214, no. 195. Both a painting and a model of the EBERHARD survive in the collections of the Focke-Museum in Bremen. - [Posted to the Emigtation-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 1 November 1998]


EDENDALE
1887-88 Lloyd's Register of Shipping lists : EDENDALE ex. Baikal, ex. Edendale. Call sign : WDHR. Official # : 68994 Master : Captain J. LeBosquet, appointed to the ship in 1904. Rigging : Iron single screw Schooner with 1 iron deck and awning deck with load line; 4 cemented bulkheads; water ballast in double bottom, aft 55 feet long and forward 28 feet long. Tonnage : 1,109 tons gross, 1,104 under deck and 718 net. Dimensions : 227 feet long, 29.5 foot beam and holds 15.9 feet deep. Built : in 1879 by J. Laing in Sunderland. Propulsion : compound engine with 2 cylinders of 27 and 50 in. diameter respectively. Stroke 36 inches. 125 nominal horsepower. New boilers in 1893. Engine built by G. Clark in Sunderland. Owners : Goh Syn Koh. Port of registry : Singapore. Flag : British - [Posted to the ShipsList by Gilbert Provost - 29 September 1998]


EDGAR P. STRINGER
The sailing ship EDGAR P. STRINGER was built by Johnson Rideout, Bath, Maine, in 1854, and was first registered at New York on 19 December 1860. 1,353 tons; 192 ft 9 in x 38 ft 11 1/2 in x 19 ft 5 3/4 in (length x beam x depth of hold) [William Armstrong Fairburn, Merchant Sail (Center Lovell, Maine: Fairburn Marine Educational Foundation, [1945]1955]), vol. 5, pp. 3205, 3207; Forrest R. Holdcamper, comp., List of American-flag Merchant Vessels that received Certificates of Enrollment or Registry at the Port of New York, 1789-1867 (Record Groups 41 and 36), National Archives Publication 68-10, Special Lists 22 (Washington, DC: National Archives and Records Service, 1968), p. 190]. - [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 2 November 1998]


EDINBURGH
Built by Tod & McGregor, Glasgow in 1855 for the British owned Glasgow and New York Steamship Co. She was a 2,197 gross ton ship, length 300.5ft x beam 39.8ft, clipper stem, one funnel, three masts (ship-rigged for sail), iron construction, single screw and a speed of 10 knots. There was accommodation for 100-1st and 700-2nd and 3rd class passengers. Launched on 10/11/1855, she sailed from Glasgow on her maiden voyage to New York on 28/12/1855. In June 1859 she collided with an iceberg, 100 miles from St John,s NF, where temporary repairs were undertaken, and on 13/7/1859 she was escorted back to Glasgow by the same company's steamer "Glasgow". She started her last Glasgow - New York voyage on 28/9/1859 and was then purchased by the Inman Line. She started her first voyage for her new owners on 23/11/1859 when she sailed from Liverpool for Queenstown (Cobh) and New York and continued this service until commencing her last voyage on 6/7/1867. In 1870 she went to the Telegraph Construction Co and was used as a cable laying steamer, and in 1879 was sold to the Dutch company, Stoomvaart Mij Insulinde. In 1880 she went to the British company, Adamson & Ronaldson and started the first of three London - Boston voyages on 23/12/1880. Between 1881-1882 she was sold to other British owners and her engines removed. Purchased at Suakin, Sudan by the Italian Government on 24/9/1885, she was despatched to Venice, rebuilt and re-engined, renamed "Eridano" and in 1886 was used as a transport in the Abyssinian Campaign. In 1893 she carried Italian exhibits destined for the Columbian Exposition at Chicago, and was subsequently used as a hydrographic ship. In approximately 1905 she became a storeship for the Italian Naval Torpedo School, and in 1907 became a hulk at Maddalena, Sardinia. She was scrapped in 1917. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P. Bonsor, vol.1, p.254] There is an excellent picture of this ship in North Atlantic Seaway, vol.1, p.252. - [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 26 May 1998]


EDINBURGH CASTLE
There were two previous ships called"Edinburgh Castle", (1872 & 1910). The second one being used as an Admiralty base ship at Freetown during WWII and then being towed to sea in 1945 and sunk by British warships.

The "Edinburgh Castle" of 1947 was built by Harland & Wolff, Belfast for the Union Castle Mail SS Co, and was a sister ship to the "Pretoria Castle". Launched by Princess Margaret on 16.10.1947, she was a 28,705 gross ton ship, length 747.5ft x beam 83.5ft, one funnel, two masts, twin screw and accommodation for 227-1st class and 478-cabin class passengers. She started her maiden voyage on 9.12.1948 when she left Southampton for South Africa. She was used on the mail ship service between Southampton and Madeira, Cape Town, Port Elizabeth, East London and Durban with occasional calls at Las Palmas on the return voyage. All of the Union Castle Line mail steamers sailed from Southampton as opposed to their "intermediate round-Africa" service which sailed from London. In 1954 she made a record run from England to Cape Town in 11 days 21.5 hours. In 1962, the 'round-Africa' service ceased and arrangements were made for the mail ships to make calls at St Helena and Ascension as required. She was withdrawn for about ten weeks in 1962 and given an extensive overhaul by Harland & Wolff at Southampton, and fitted with air conditioning. Rebuilt in 1965 to carry 155-1st and 491-tourist class passengers, and her mainmast removed, she was then used on a new accelerated service of eleven and a half days to Cape Town in conjunction with Safmarine. She continued on this service until her last arrival at Southampton on 12.4.1976. Sailed for Durban, where she arrived on 10th May with cargo only, and then on to Kaohsiung, Taiwan, where she arrived on 3rd June for breaking up. [The Cape Run by W.H.Mitchell & L.A.Sawyer] - [Posted to the ShipsList by Ted Finch - 17 May 1998]


EDISON
See KONIGIN LOUISE.


EDITH BYRNE
See HERSCHEL (3).


EDITH F.
See JUNO.


EDMUND B.ALEXANDER
See AMERIKA (2).


EDUARD REGEL
See HEKLA.


EGEO
See RHENANIA.


EGLINTON
A 464-ton barque 'Eglinton', which had been built in Quebec, left London in April 1852. The boat carried a crew of twenty-one and thirty settlers... On the 6th of May 1852, the ship passed between St. Andrews and St. Vincents, two of the Cape Verde Islands. The next land, Tristan da Cunha, was sighted at 7.30 a.m. on the 16th of June. When they arrived at Tristan da Cunha, the Captain found that his chronometer was reading incorrectly. Before the voyage he had asked the ship-owners for a new one, but this had been refused. A few days before their arrival at Cape of Good Hope, they observed an eclipse of the moon. The Captain, Robert Bennett, made the observation in order to correct his chronometer. John Henderson, a passenger with whom he was on friendly terms, helped him by taking down the time while the Captain took the sights, and apparently the problem was solved. They remained for 25 days in Cape of Good Hope, anchored in Simons Bat. The ship left at about 2 or 3 o'clock in the afternoon of the 29th of July... Over a month later, of Friday the 3rd of September, the Captain, assisted by John Henderson, calculated the longitude to position the ship at about 150 miles from land. After consulting his chart, the Captain told his passengers they would see land the following morning, and somewhat shortened sail. The first mate, George Carphin, was of the opinion that they were much closer, because of the discoloration of the seawater, and suggested to the captain, with whom he was not on very good terms, and who would have none of it, saying that he the Captain was paid to think, not Carphin. At about sunset that day, the weather was cloudy and hazy, the wind fresh and the ship running at about 7 knots. After sunset it became dark. Instead of preparing anchors and making general preparations for arrival, the crew and passengers embarked on a party to celebrate both their last night aboard and the birthday of a girl passenger. Disaster struck at 9.45 p.m.. Instead of heading directly for Fremantle, the ship had passed 20 miles north of Rottnest, bad visibility preventing sighting of the island lighthouse. The Captain, by then in his bunk, and the party 'in the cuddy', were aroused by a cry of "breakers-ahead". The Captain, called by the third mate John James, hurried to the deck, but too late. The ship, which had been running free before the wind, almost immediately struck heavily upon the outer line of reefs which bound the coast. The impact carried away the rudder, but fortunately the ship was borne over the reef by the sea and then carried forward to another reef about a mile from the shore, where she again struck to become fixed with head out of water. Though the "Eglinton" was hard on the reef and in danger of breaking up, the crew and passengers felt they themselves were in no immediate danger. The ship's back might be broken, yet it was still conjectured that she could last a week providing no storm should hit her. However, had she struck the outer reef with the same force, they were all equally convinced that every soul on board, numbering 51 persons, would have been lost. At some time during the evening after the ship had struck the reef, George Carphin, the first mate, gave the ship's log to the captain. However, these papers were later to disappear mysteriously, thus complicating the inquiry into the disaster. Next morning, Saturday the 4th of September, a landing was attempted. The crew, accodring to a passenger, were 'running about in confusion, not knowing what to do'. The long-boat was lowered, only to be swept away in the heavy seas. Then the gig was smashed on the rocks alongside. The third boat did manage to get clear and, on Saturday and Sunday, was to make several trips to shore. The surf made a landing almost impracticable without great assistance from the shore by people running into the surf, to seize the boat and drag it on to the beach. The passengers were hauled from the Eglinton one by one, by lowering them by a rope tied around the waist and supported by a life-buoy. Next morning, Sunday the 5th of September, the boatswain began drinking heavily. Suddenly he seized the ship's chronometer, the instrument blamed for the shipwreck, and flung it into the sea. Then he jumped in after it, to drown before the eyes of the horrified passengers. The loss of the chronometer was to hinder the inquiry into the disaster even further. The captain, together with some of the passengers and several of the sailors, did not leave the ship until Sunday morning. On one trip, with the boat filled with female passengers, it was just attempting to land when it was completely turned over in the surf and, with one exception, everyone was under the boat. It was here that the second loss of life occurred, that of Mrs. Bartram, sister of the Messrs. Carter, of Fremantle, who was thought to have been struck by the boat and so drowned. In the same accident, Mrs. Huxley was seriously injured. Family tradition has it that Mrs. Louisa Glaskin and her son were also involved in this accident, and that she had to swim ashore while supporting her 5-year-old son. Mr. John Henderson, together with the ship's mate and another crew member, left the scene of the wreck and, keeping to the coast, went for help. It took them twenty-four hours to reach Fremantle. Taking into account the country they had to traverse, and after already having gone through the ordeal of being wrecked, this was regarded as a 'most praiseworthy instance of determination and perseverance'. Immediately, on hearing the news, every exertion was made at Fremantle to send assistance. The 'William Pope' (with diving apparatus to recover the treasure in coins amounting to 15,000 pounds), the 'Typo' and two other boats reached the wreck the same afternoon, but were unable to hold any communication with the shore until the following morning. John Henderson, although suffering severely from the effects of fatigue and want of food and water, returned in the Water Police boat which, together with the Harbour Master's boat, had also been despatched by the Fremantle authorities who, on this occasion, were considered to have 'displayed a promptitude and energy which did them much credit'. Food, clothing and blankets, of which the party were destitute, were also forwarded. Eight or nine sailors broke open some of the passenger's boxes, stealing a silver cup and other plate, money and jewellery. Then, at about seven in the morning, they left without permission with their loot. On Monday afternoon at about five o'clock they arrived at Mr. Shenton's at Wanneroo, having been found on the beach by a native herdsman. The next morning, Mr. Shenton persuaded the men to return to the wreck. With them he sent his bullock-cart, by which two of the female passengers (one probably being the badly injured Mrs. Huxley) and a child reached his house the same evening, and were forwarded on to Perth on Wednesday. From one of these sailors who returned to the wreck, a quantity of jewellery belonging to Mrs. Walcott was obtained upon her paying him five pounds; this, however, was taken from the thief when the authorities arrived. The 15,000 pounds in coins, together with the mail, had been in the stern; when that section broke, it all went down in about 10 feet of water. A tocket-of-leave man, Rodriguez, under the direction of Lieutenant Wray, recovered this treasure by Tuesday afternoon, the diver remaining below twenty minutes at a time. However, it did not then seem that the mail was recoverable. The scene on the shore was "almost melancholy, the unfortunate passengers lying there without shelter, and short of water and provisions, a severe initiation into colonial life". However, their ordeal was still not over, as apparently they then walked all the way to Perth. Later on, Rodriguez also recovered the mail after all, together with cases of gunpowder which were then sent to Fremantle under escort of the 99th regiment. Rodriguez was recommended for a 200 pounds reward by the Governor, Mr. Charles FitzGerald, who rather loftily reported in a Colonial Office despatch: "he behaved with much commendable daring and unusual disinterestedness." Mr. Fauntleroy had had his property insured for 2,800 pounds, but several other passengers were not insured and had lost everything. Two of the sailors were gaoled for looting and the captain was found guilty of negligence; however, "in consideration of his misfortune", he was fined only fifty pounds, and even then this sum was raised by sympathetic colonists.The ship's dog, having already survived the previous wreck of the Birkenhead, was washed off the Eglinton by mountainous seas. It managed to make its own way to shore and, subsequently adopted by a Fremantle family, became "the most famous canine in the colony." [Posted to The Conference of Australian History Mailing List by Leo van de Pas - 2 January 1998]


EGYPT
The "Egypt" was a 4670 ton vessel built in 1871 for the National Line. She had a straight stem, two funnels and four masts, rigged for sail on the foremast. She was burned at sea in July 1890 and the complement rescued by the barque "Gustav Oscar". 600 cattle were lost in the sinking. .[Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Ted Finch - 16 June 1997]

The steamship EGYPT was built by the Liverpool Shipbuilding Co, Liverpool (engines by J. Jack, Rollo & Co, Liverpool) for the National Steamship Co Ltd (National Line), and launched on 9 February 1871. 4,670 tons; 135,02 x 13,50 meters (443 x 44.3 feet, length x beam); straight bow, two funnels, 4 masts; iron construction, screw propulsion, service speed 13 knots; accommodation for 120 1st-class and 1,400 steerage-class passengers. The EGYPT was, at the time of her launching, the second largest ship in the world, after the GREAT EASTERN. 10 November 1871, maiden voyage, Liverpool-Queenstown-New York. 18 January 1883, single roundtrip voyage, Liverpool-Queenstown-New York, chartered to the Inman Line. 8 November 1889, last voyage, Liverpool-New York. 2 January 1890, first voyage, London-New York. 18 June 1890, last voyage, London - New York. 10 July 1890, left New York for Liverpool; 19 July, destroyed by fire at sea (no lives lost) [Noel Reginald Pixell Bonsor, North Atlantic Seaway; An Illustrated History of the Passenger Services Linking the Old World with the New (2nd ed.; Jersey, Channel Islands: Brookside Publications), vol. 2 (1978), p. 614]. Pictured in Michael J. Anuta, Ships of Our Ancestors (Menominee, MI: Ships of Our Ancestors, 1983), p. 88, courtesy of the Steamship Historical Society of America, Langsdale Library, University of Baltimore, 1420 Maryland Ave., Baltimore, MD 21201 [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 19 November 1997]


EIDER
The "Eider" was a 4722 gross ton iron built vessel, built by John Elder & Co. of Glasgow in 1883 for Norddeutscher Lloyd [North German Lloyd]. Her dimensions were length 429.8ft x beam 47ft, straight stem, two funnels, four masts, single screw and a speed of 16 knots. There was accommodation for 120-1st class, 130-2nd class and 1,000-3rd class passengers. She was launched on 15/12/1883 and left Bremen for Southampton and New York on her maiden voyage on 19/3/1884. She left Bremen on her last voyage on 31/1/1892 and stranded on Atherfield Ledge, Isle of Wight, was refloated and scrapped. [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Ted Finch]

The steamship EIDER was built for Norddeutscher Lloyd (the first of two vessels of this name owned by the company) by John Elder & Co, Glasgow (ship #283), and launched on 15 December 1883. 4,719 tons; 135,5 x 14,32 meters (length x breadth); straight stem, 2 funnels, 4 masts; iron construction, screw propulsion, double-expansion engines, service speed 16.5 knots; accommodation for 194 passengers in 1st class, 134 in 2nd class, and 876 in steerage; crew of 168. 19 March 1884, maiden voyage, Bremen-Southampton-New York. 9 January 1892, last voyage, Bremen-Southampton-New York. 31 January 1892, on return voyage, Capt. Heineke, with 367 passengers, a cargo of piece goods, cotton and corn, and 250,000 pounds sterling in gold and silver, stranded on Atherfield Ledge, Isle of Wight, with no loss of life; passengers and crew left Southampton for Bremerhaven on 6 February 1892 on board the Norddeutscher Lloyd steamship ALLER. 29 March 1892, refloated by the North German Salvage Union, and towed to Southampton for scrapping [Edwin Drechsel, Norddeutscher Lloyd Bremen, 1857-1970; History, Fleet, Ship Mails, vol. 1 (Vancouver: Cordillera Pub. Co., c1994), pp. 23-25 (photographs) and 89 (photograph); Noel Reginald Pixell Bonsor, North Atlantic Seaway; An Illustrated History of the Passenger Services Linking the Old World with the New (2nd ed.; Jersey, Channel Islands: Brookside Publications), vol. 2 (1978), p. 552]. Also pictured in Michael J. Anuta, Ships of Our Ancestors (Menominee, MI: Ships of Our Ancestors, 1983), p. 89, courtesy of Mystic Seaport Museum, 50 Greenmanville Ave., Mystic, CT 06355-0990. - [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 2 November 1998]


EKATERINOSLAV
See ASSYRIA (2) .


EKMA
The 1926-27 Lloyd's Register of Shipping provides the following :EKMA Call sign : HVBS Official # : 132999 Rigging : steel twin screw Schooner; 2 decks; steel upper deck sheathed with wood and steel shade deck sheathed with teak; 7 bulkheads, 5 to upper deck and 2 to second deck; flat keel; water ballast : cellular double bottom, aft 76 feet long, under engine and boilers 108 feet long and forward 156 feet long, 732 tons. Forward Peak Tank 58 tons, Aft Peak Tank 44 tons; fitted with electric light and wireless. Tonnage : 5,108 tons gross, 3,724 under deck and 2,356 net. Dimensions : 410 feet long, 52.6 foot beam and 24.7 foot draught. Shade Deck 158 feet long. Built in 1911 by Workman, Clark & Co. in Belfast. Owners : British India Steam navigation Co. Ltd. Propulsion : triple-expansion engine with 6 cylinders of 24 in., 41 in. and 69 in. diameter per pair. Stroke 48 inches. 1,062 nominal horsepower. 2 double ended and 2 single ended boilers, 24 corrugate furnaces, grate surface 390 square feet, heating surface 16,302 square feet; forced draught. Engine built by same company as the hull. Port of registry : Glasgow Flag : British - [Posted to The ShipsList by Gilbert Provost - 23 September 1998]

The "Ekma" was a sister ship to the "Erinpura" and was used on the same service. On 16th Sep.1914 she carried Gurkha troops from Karachi to Marseilles in the same convoy as the "Erinpura" and in Nov.1914 trooped between Bombay and Iraq. In Dec. 1915 she transported Punjabi troops from Aden to Basra and in Feb.1916 carried Gurkhas from Suez to Karachi and returned with Gurkha reliefs. In May 1916 she trooped between Suez and Bushire and on to Basra, Dec.1917 Karachi - Basra, May 1918 Karachi - Basra with Gurkhas and Sikhs. Thereafter she resumed her normal commercial sailings until July 1942 when she carried part of the Australian 6th Division from Colombo to Australia. In Feb.1946 she brought Punjabi soldiers from Port Blair to Calcutta and in Nov.1946 moved the Gurkha Rifles from Batavia to Port Swettenham. She was sold on 1st May 1948 and broken up at Bombay. [Merchant Fleets by Duncan Haws, vol.11, British India S.N.Co] - [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 24 September 1998]


EL AMIGO
See JUNO.


ELBE (1)
There was an "Elbe" built in 1849 for the Hamburg America Line. This was a 385 ton sailing vessel which carried 20-1st and 200-steerage passengers. She sailed between Hamburg and New York until 1864 when she was sold and renamed "Sarah". In 1866 she went to Danish owners and was renamed "Ansgar", sold to Russia in 1879 and wrecked on 14.11.1900. - [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 6 June 1998]

The "Elbe" was a German built, three masted, barque rigged, wooden hulled vessel, built in 1849. She was 385 gross tons, and had accommodation for 20-1st class and 200-steerage passengers and carried a crew of 16. She commenced Hamburg - New York sailings in 1849, and the average one-way passage took 42 days. She was sold in 1864 and renamed "Sarah". In 1866 she went to Danish owners and was renamed "Ansgar", and in 1879 was sold to Russia. She was wrecked on Nov.14th 1900. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P. Bonsor, vol.1, p.347] [Merchant Fleets by Duncan Haws, vol.4, Hamburg America Line] - [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 9 October 1998]


ELBE (2)
The "Elbe" was built by John Elder & Co, Glasgow in 1881 for North German Lloyd of Bremen. She was a 4,510 gross ton ship, length 416.5ft x beam 45ft, straight stem, two funnels, four masts, iron construction, single screw and a speed of 15 knots. There was accommodation for 120-1st, 130-2nd and 1,000-3rd class passengers. Launched on 2/4/1881, she sailed from Bremen on her maiden voyage to Southampton and New York on 26/6/1881. She was a record breaking ship at the time and sailed from Southampton to Sandy Hook in 8 days 12 hours 50 minutes, and in the Easterly direction in 8d 9h 10m. She sailed from Bremen on her final voyage on 29/1/1895, and the following day was sunk in collision with the British ship "Craithie" in the North Sea with the loss of 322 lives. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P. Bonsor, vol.2, p.551] - [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 21 March 1998]

The steamship ELBE was built by John Elder & Co, Glasgow, for Norddeutscher Lloyd, and launched on 2 April 1881. 4,510 tons; 131,9 x 13,7 meters (length x breadth); straight bow, 2 funnels, 4 masts; iron construction, screw propulsion, double-expansion engines, service speed 16 knots; accommodation for 179 passengers in 1st class, 142 in 2nd class, and 796 in steerage. The ELBE was Norddeutscher Lloyd's first express steamer, and the first Norddeutscher Lloyd vessel with first class amidships instead of aft; uneconomic due to high coal consumption, and small amount of freight space. 26 June 1881, maiden voyage, Bremen-Southampton-New York. 1883, outfitted with electric lights. October 1889, first of three voyages to Australia. 29 January 1895, sailed from Bremen for New York; 30 January 1895, collided off the Dutch coast with the British coal collier CRAITHIE, and sank in 20 minutes, with the loss of 332 of the 352 on board [Edwin Drechsel, Norddeutscher Lloyd Bremen, 1857-1970; History, Fleet, Ship Mails (Vancouver: Cordillera Pub. Co., c1994), vol. 1, p. 76, no. 50 (2 pictures); Noel Reginald Pixell Bonsor, North Atlantic Seaway; An Illustrated History of the Passenger Services Linking the Old World with the New (2nd ed.; Jersey, Channel Islands: Brookside Publications), vol. 2 (1978), p. 551]. - [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 5 July 1998]


ELBERFELD
See HERCYNIA.


ELDERSLIE
The "Elderslie" was a 2,761 gross ton refrigerated cargo ship built by Palmer's of Jarrow-on-Tyne in 1884 for Turnbull, Martin & Co's Shire Line. She catered for a limited number of 1st and 2nd class passengers as well as emigrants who occupied temporary accommodation in part of the cargo 'tween decks space on the outward journey to Australian and New Zealand ports via the Cape of Good Hope. She was chartered at times to Trinder Anderson & Co and Shaw Savill Line and was eventually sold in 1898 to the Simpson Steamship Co. [North Star to Southern Cross by John M.Maber] - Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 18 August 1998]


EL DORADO
The vessel is first listed in Lloyd's Register for 1850/51 as the British *ship* (while both a ship and a bark are 3-masted sailing vessels, they differ in that all of a ship's masts are square rigged, while on a bark only the fore and main masts are square-rigged, the mizzen mast being rigged fore-and-aft) EL DORADO, 913/977 tons (old/new measurement), built at St. Andrews in 1848; Lloyd's Register for 1850/51 gives the following additional information on this vessel: Master: Morrison. Owner: Gilmour. Port of registry: St. Andrews. Port of survey: Liverpool. Iintended voyage: Savann[ah] - [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 15 August 1998]


ELEANORA
See GREAT BRITAIN (1).


ELECTRIC
The ELECTRIC was a "medium clipper", built by Irons & Grinnell, at Stonington/Mystic, CT, launched on 5 September 1853, and registered at New York on 10 November 1853. 1046 tons (1273 tons in the New York certificate of registry); 185' 1" x 38' 7" x 21' 5" (length x beam x depth of hold). She was owned first by G. Adams, and later by the Gerry family of New York. She made a single voyage around Cape Horn to California, sailing from New York on 15 November 1854, and arriving at San Francisco on 4 March 1855, a passage of 116 days. She sailed from San Francisco on 24 March 1855, and crossed the Pacific to Hong Kong in 48 days. From Hong Kong she proceeded to Shanghai, from where she sailed to New York in 106 days. Aside from this single round the world voyage, the ELECTRIC served in the transatlantic trade, in particular between New York, Havre, and Antwerp. On 30 July 1856, she was purchased from Brower, of New York, for $62,250, by the Hamburg shipowner Robert Miles Sloman, who continued to employ her primarily in the North Atlantic trade. On 2 November 1868, she sailed from Hamburg with 350 passengers and a general cargo, and on 21 December 1868, went ashore at Great Egg harbor, New Jersey. Her passengers were landed on the beach, her cargo was lightered, and she was towed to New York, where extensive repairs were made. On 7 November 1872, while bound from Hamburg to New York, she was abandoned, leaky and nearly full of water, in lat. 40 North, lon. 55 West. Her crew, together with the crew of the British bark CHASE--which the ELECTRIC had earlier come upon in a sinking condition--were picked up by the HELMESBRAND, Kjaer, master, and landed at Queenstown (Cobh), Ireland. Masters: 1856-1859 - J. C. Wienholtz; 1859-1863 - H. C. Johannsen; 1863-1869 - J. Junge; 1869-1872 - C. J. N. Peyn. Voyages: 1856-1861 - Mlb/intermediate ports/Bremerhaven; 1861 - New York; 1861-1862 - New York; 1862 - New York /London; 1862-1863 - New York/London; 1863-1864 - La Plata/Callao; 1864 - New York/London;1864-1865 - New York /Newcastle on Tyne; 1865- New York/London; 1865-1866 - New York/London; 1866 - New York; 1866 - New York /Bremerhaven; 1866-1867 - New York/London; 1867 - New York/Philadelphia; 1867-1868 - New York/Philadelphia /Bremerhaven; 1868 - New York; 1868-1869 - New York/Bremerhaven; 1869-1871 - Dona Francisca/Batavia/Semarang /Nieuwediep/Amsterdam; 1871-1872 - New York/Bremerhaven; 1872 - New York (twice).
Sources: Octavius T. Howe and Frederick C. Matthews, American clipper ships, 1833-1858, Marine Research Society (Salem, Mass.) Publication No. 13 (Salem, MA: Marine Research Society, 1926-27), vol. 1, pp. 153-154; Carl C. Cutler, Greyhounds of the sea : the story of the American clipper ship (New York: Halcyon House, c1930), pp. 426 and 497; William Armstrong Fairburn, Merchant Sail (Center Lovell, ME: Fairburn Marine Educational Foundation, [1945-1955]), II.1272,; III.1662, 1964, 2021, 2023, 2029, 2037, 2040, 2059, 2069, 2097; IV.2267, 2648; V.2856, 2858, 2859; VI.3649; Ernst Hieke, Rob. M. Sloman jr., errichtet 1793, Veroffentlichungen der Wirtschaftsgeschichtlichen Forschungsstelle e.V., Hamburg, Bd. 30 (Hamburg: Verlag Hanseatischer Merkur, 1968), p. 374; Forrest R. Holdcamper, List of American-flag Merchant Vessels that received Certificates of Enrollment or Registry at the Port of New York, 1789-1867 (Record Groups 41 and 36), National Archives Publication No. 68-10, Special Lists No. 22 (Washington, DC: National Archives and Records Service, 1968), p. 196 Walter Kresse, ed., Seeschiffs-Verzeichnis der Hamburger Reedereien, 1824-1888, Mitteilungen aus dem Museum fur Hamburgische Geschichte, N. F., Bd. 5. (Hamburg: Museum fur Hamburgische Geschichte, 1969), vol. 2, p. 212. [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 10 November 1997]


ELECTRIQUE
See ZEELAND (1).


ELIJAH SWIFT
The ELIJAH SWIFT was not a ship but a bark, a 3-masted vessel, the fore- and mainmasts square-rigged, the mizzenmast (the sternmost mast) rigged fore-and-aft. She was built at Falmouth, Maine, in 1847, and was registered at the Port of New York on 24 January 1848; she was 371 tons [Forrest R. Holdcamper, comp., List of American-flag Merchant Vessels that received Certificates of Enrollment or Registry at the Port of New York, 1789-1867 (Record Groups 41 and 36), National Archives Publication 68-10, Special Lists 22 (Washington, DC: National Archives and Records Service, 1968), p. 197]. - [Posted to the Emigration-Ships List by Michael Palmer - 29 March 1998]


ELISE (1)
Bremen ship/bark ELISE. Built by Johann Lange, Vegesak/Grohn, and launched on 10 May 1835 for the Bremen firm of Albers & Koncke. In 1850, she belonged half to the firm of J. D. Koncke Hermanns Sohn and half to Ferdinand Henschen. 177 Commerzlasten/415 tons register; 31,4 x 8,8 x 5,1 meters (length x beam x depth of hold). The ELISE was originally rigged as a ship, but sometime in late 1852 or early 1853, she was re-rigged as a bark. The maritime news columns of the New York newspapers report the following: Bremen ship Elise, Gatjen, master, arrived at New York on 28 August 1851, 38 days from Bremen, with merchandise and 175 passengers:- Bremen bark Elise, Nordenholdt, master, arrived at New York on 28 September 1856, 53 days from Bremen, with merchandise and 171 passengers. On the return leg of this last voyage, the crew of the ELISE rescued 16 survivors from the sunken French steamer LYONNAIS, as reported in the Weser-Zeitung for 4 December 1856.In 1857, the Bremen bark ELISE was sold to O. C. Reinhardt & D.Isaachsen, of Christiansand, Norway, who renamed her VESTA; her captain under the Norwegian flag was T. A. Torjussen. In May 1863, she was standed at Newfoundland, and became a total loss [Peter-Michael Pawlik, Von der Weser in die Welt; Die Geschichte der Segelschiffe von Weser und Lesum und ihrer Bauwerften 1770 bis 1893, Schriften des Deutschen Schiffahrtsmuseums, Bd. 33 (Hamburg: Kabel, c1993), pp. 187-188. Pawlik's work contains a photograph of the newspaper announcement of the launching of the ELISE in 1835, but the vessel pictured is a steamship, and the picture is probably a stylized representation of the river steamer BREMEN that carried onlookers to the launching from Bremen to Vegesack and back to Bremen. [E-mail from Michael Palmer - 9 December 1997]


ELISE (2)
Hamburg bark ELISE. The New York newspapers report the following on the arrival of the Elise: Hamburg bark Elise, Jenner, master, arrived at New York on 30 April 1852, 41 days from Hamburg, with 134 passengers; had 2 births and 1 death on the passage. The bark ELISE was built in Nyborg, Denmark, in 1842. 129 Commerzlasten; 110 x 28,7 x 15,10 Hamburg feet (1 Hamburg Fuss = .286 meters) (length x beam x depth of hold), "zwischen den Steven". On 14 January 1850, she was purchased from Kruse, of Nyborg, by the Hamburg firm of C. Rubcke & Woellmer. Master: 1850-1852 - H. H. D. N. I. Trautmann; 1852-1853 - J. Jenner; 1853-1855 - C. J. S. Bruhn; 1855-1860 - A. Nielsen; 1860-1862 - D. A. Hunaus. Voyages: 1850 - New York (2 x); 1850/51 - New York; 1851 - New York; 1851/52 - New York; 1852- New York (2 x); 1852/53 - New York/ Liverpool; 1853 - New York; 1853/54 - New York/Cardiff; 1854 - New York (2 x); 1854/55 - New York; 1855/56 - St. Uebes (Setubal)/Montevideo/intermediate ports/ Amsterdam; 1856 - Quebec/London; 1856/57 - New York/La Guayra/Puerto Cabello/ Altona; 1857/58 - New York/London; 1858 - New York; 1858/59 - Rio de Janeiro/intermediat ports/Hartlepool; 1859/60 - St. Thomas/Laguna d. T., Mexico; 1860 - Laguna d. T./Altona; 1860/61 - New York; 1861 - Bristol. She was sold in 1862 [Walter Kresse, ed., Seeschiffs-Verzeichnis der Hamburger Reedereien, 1824-1888, Mitteilungen aus dem Museum fur Hamburgische Geschichte, N. F., Bd. 5. (Hamburg: Museum fur Hamburgische Geschichte, 1969), vol. 1, p. 157]. I do not have any information at present on her later history or ultimate fate. To determine whether there exists a pictorial representation of the Hamburg bark ELISE, contact the Museum fur Hamburgische Geschichte, Holstenwall 24, D-20355 Hamburg. [E-mail from Michael Palmer - 9 December 1997]


ELLEN RICKMERS
See BORKUM.


ELSIE RUGER
See ALBONI.


ELVIRA
See ARGONAUT.


ELYSIA
The "Elysia" was built by John Elder & Co, Glasgow (engines by Finnieston Steamship Works, Glasgow) in 1873 for the Anchor Line. She was a 2,733 gross ton ship, length 351ft x beam 35ft, one funnel, three masts (rigged for sail), iron construction, single screw and a speed of 13 knots. There was accommodation for 100-1st, 40-2nd and 500-3rd class passengers. Launched on 28/6/1873, she sailed from Glasgow on her maiden voyage to Moville and New York on 11/10/1873. She commenced her 21st and last voyage on this service on 26/2/1876 and commenced London - New York crossings on 27/5/1876. She made 38 round voyages on this route, the last starting on 6/8/1881. Between 1881-1883 she made 2 voyages between Glasgow, Liverpool and Bombay and two to Calcutta. Between 1882-1885 she made five round voyages between Glasgow, Mediterranean ports, New York and Glasgow, and in 1883 was fitted with new compound engines and her 1st class passenger capacity reduced to 12. She made three London - Halifax - Boston sailings in 1885 and then transferred to the Mediterranean - New York service for 35 round voyages. Her last crossing started on 27/5/1897 when she left Genoa for Naples, Leghorn and New York (arr.6/7/1897). On 11/6/1898 she was scrapped in Italy. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.1, p.459] - [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 14 March 1998]


EMILIA PELLEGRINA
See IL PIEMONTE.


EMIL KIRDORFF
The 1926-27 Lloyd's Register of Shipping provides the following: EMIL KIRDORFF Call sign : RCPL Rigging : steel single screw steamer; 2 decks; equipped with electric light, wireless and submarine signalling device; fitted for oil fuel. Tonnage : 5,695 tons gross, 4,403 under deck and 3,426 net. Dimensions : 409.8 feet long, 53,9 foot beam and 23.7 foot draught. Forecastle 49 feet long. Built in 1922 by Marinewerft in Wilhelmshaven. Owners : A.G. Hugo Stinnes f?r Seeschiff. Und Ueberseehandel. Propulsion : triple-expansion engine with 3 cylinders of 25 in., 41 in. and 66 1/8 in. diameter respectively. Stroke 49 inches. 305 nominal horsepower. Engine built by same company as the hull. Port of registry : Hamburg Flag : German - [Posted to The ShipsList by Gilbert Provost -23 September 1998]

The EMIL KIRDORF was one of 4 nearly identical vessels by Marinewerft Wilhelmshaven (ship #66) for the A.G. Hugo Stinnes between 1921 and 1923; launched 25 February 1922, delivered 2 August 1922. 5,695 tons gross/3,426 tons net; 124.89 x 16.41 x 7.21 meters/409 ft 9 in x 53 ft 10 in x 23 ft 8 in (length x breadth x depth of hold); 1 funnel, 2 masts; single screw, triple expansion and low pressure turbine; 3 cylinders, 64.13 cm (25 1/4 in), 104.14 cm (41 in), and 167.64 cm (66 in), stroke 125.09 cm (49 1/4 in), 305 nominal horsepower, service speed 11 knots; steel construction, 1 deck and shelter deck, forecastle 49 14.93 meters (49 ft); cargo capacity 11,603 cubic meters (410,000 cubic feet) grain; accommodation for 50 passengers in 1st class; crew of 72. Ran originally in Stinnes's South American service. November 1926, acquired by HaPAG (Hamburg-America Line). First on HaPAG's East Asian service, later transferred to the South American service. 1928, new turbine, service speed increased to 12 knots. 1932, sold to Serv. Mar. Romania, Braila, and renamed ARDEAL. 11 June 1942, torpedoed by Soviet U boat A 5 in the Black Sea, and beached. 1945, refloated by the Soviets and repaired in Odessa. 1948, returned to Romania (managed by Sovromtransport). 1963, scrapped in Romania [Arnold Kludas and Herbert Bischoff, Die Schiffe der Hamburg-Amerika-Linie, Bd. 2: 1907-1926 (Herford: Koehler, 1980), pp. 150-151 (photograph); Duncan Haws, Merchant Fleets in Profile, vol. 4: The ships of the Hamburg America, Adler and Carr Lines (Cambridge: Patrick Stevens, 1980) p. 143, no. 519 (silhouette)].- [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 23 September 1998]


EMILY GARDINER
See LORD BROUGHAM.


EMMY
The EMMY was a 3-masted, square-rigged ship, built in Stockholm in 1847, and acquired in the same year by the Hamburg shipping firm of Joh[ann] Ces[ar] Godeffroy & Sohn (Bielbrief [certificate of registry], 6 December 1847). 277 Commerzlasten; physical dimensions not known. Master: 1848-1849 - M. Wilcken; 1849-1850 - J. H. O. Meyer. Voyages:1847/49 - from Stockholm /intermediate ports /Rotterdam; 1849/50 - Adelaide /Penang /Singapore; 1850 - Valparaiso/San Francisco. She was lost in December 1850 in the Cape Verde Island [Walter Kresse, ed., Seeschiffs-Verzeichnis der Hamburger Reedereien, 1824-1888, Mitteilungen aus dem Museum fur Hamburgische Geschichte, N. F., Bd. 5. (Hamburg: Museum fur Hamburgische Geschichte, 1969), vol. 1, p. 165]. For the precise dates of (what appears to be) the only voyage of the EMMY to Australia (Adelaide), see R. T. Sexton, Shipping arrivals and departures, South Australia, 1627-1850 : guide for genealogists and maritime historians, Roebuck Society Publication No. 42 (Ridgehaven, SA: Gould Books/ Aranda, ACT: Roebuck Society, 1990); to determine whether an account of this voyage survives, see Ian Hawkins Nicholson, Log of logs : a catalogue of logs, journals, shipboard diaries, letters, and all forms of voyage narratives, 1788 to 1988, for Australia and New Zealand and surrounding oceans, Roebuck Society Publication Nos. 41, 47 (2 vols; Yaroomba, Qld: The Author jointly with the Australian Association for Maritime History, [1990]-1993). [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 10 December 1997]


EMPIRE BRENT
See LETITIA.


EMPIRE CANDIDA
See PELDALE.


EMPIRE CITY
The EMPIRE CITY was a wooden side-wheel steamer, built by William H. Brown, New York, keel laid 13 August 1848, launched 10 March 1849. 1,751 21/95 tons; 238 ft 8 in x 39 ft 4 in x 24 ft 4 in (length x beam x depth of hold); 3 decks, 3 masts, round stern, dragon head; one side-lever engine built by T. F. Secor & Co; diameter of cylinder 6 ft 3 in, length of stroke 9 ft; barkentine rig; estimated cost between $220,000 and $300,000, of which $62,000 was for the engine. Modeled for speed and very strong. Said to be the first ocean vessel to have a deck house extending from stem to stern, her hurricane deck supported by stanchions from the bulwarks and forming a canopy for the promenade deck below. Her interior was the most ornate of any steamship on the Atlantic. From the stern forward, her upper deck housed a ladies' cabin or reception room, with rosewood furniture upholstered in purple and gold damask, and lined with staterooms, every stateroom door being decorated with a Hudson River scene; the galley; a "Social Hall" 35 ft long in which men might smoke; and the forecastle. On the main deck, the waiters' quarters were forward, then the dining saloon, off of which opened staterooms with two berths each, the doors to which were decorated with scenes from Washington Irving's _Sketch Book_, then the pantry, and then the after saloon, off of which opened staterooms with four berths each and large windows with glass an inch thick. Ornamental columns had gilded Corinthian capitals, and were set off by satin and zebra wood. The decks were covered with oilcloth patterned to look like carpet. Laid down for Isaac Newton, for his service between New York and New Orleans, but sold on the stocks, in January 1849, to Charles Morgan and John and Joseph Howard (Empire City Line). 17 July 1849, maiden voyage, New York-Chagres. October 1850, came under the control of the Pacific Mail Steamship Co; early 1851, sold for $225,000 to the United States Mail Steamship Co, which placed her in the New York-Havana-New Orleans service. Continued as part of the U.S. Mail fleet until it was disbanded in 1859, when she was acquired, at auction, for $12,000 by Marshall O. Roberts, the last principal stockholder and managing agent of the line; Roberts carried on the service from New York to New Orleans and continued to advertise under the U.S. Mail name, even though the original company no longer existed. Chartered by the Quartermaster's Department, War Department, in 1861, for $25,000 the job, and in 1861, 1862-1863, 1863, and 1864, at $775 to $1,000 per day. October 1861, transport on Admiral DuPont's expedition to Port Royal; 1862, went up the Mississippi and passed besieged Vicksburg, again as a transport; 1864, delivered men to General Butler during the invasion of the North Carolina Sounds. 27 January 1865, purchased by the War Department for $225,000. In 1866, considered for use as a floating hospital at the New York Quarantine Station, but never put to use. Laid up at Red Hook until May 1869, and broken up sometime thereafter [John Haskell Kemble, The Panama Route, 1848-1869, University of California Publications in History, 29 (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1943),pp. 224-225; Cedric Ridgely-Nevitt, American Steamships on the Atlantic (Newark: University of Delaware Press, c1981),, pp. 121-125]. [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer 14 December 1997]


EMPIRE CLYDE
See CAMERONIA .


EMPIRE HELFORD
See LITUANIA.


EMPIRE LAGAN
See ANNA SALEN.


EMPIRE PENRYN
See CZAR.


EMPIRE STATE
See PRESIDENT WILSON.


EMPRESS OF AUSTRALIA
See DE GRASSE.


EMPRESS OF BRITAIN (1)
The "Empress of Britain" was built for the Canadian Pacific Line by Fairfield Shipbuilding, Glasgow in 1906. She was a 14,189 gross ton vessel, length 548.8ft x beam 65.7ft, two funnels, two masts, twin screw and a speed of 18 knots. There was accommodation for 310-1st, 470-2nd and 750-3rd class passengers. Launched on 11/11/1905 she sailed from Liverpool on her maiden voyage to Quebec on 5/5/1906. Both the "Empress of Britain" and her sister ship, the ill-fated "Empress of Ireland" were the fastest ships on the Canada service at the time. On 22/7/1912, she rammed and sank the SS Helvetia in fog off Cape Magdeleine in the lower St Lawrence River. In 1914 she was converted to an Armed Merchant Cruiser and joined Admiral Stoddart's squadron in the S.Atlantic. She later patrolled between Cape Finisterre and the Cape Verde Islands. In May 1915 she was recommisioned as a troop transport and carried more than 110,000 troops to the Dardanelles, Egypt and India as well as Canadian and US expeditionary forces across the N.Atlantic. On 12/12/1915 while passing through the Straits of Gibraltar, she collided with and sank a Greek steamer. In March 1919 she resumed the Liverpool - St.John NB service for one round voyage and was then converted from coal to oil fuel and her passenger accommodation was modernised. On 1/9/1920 she returned to the Liverpool - Quebec service and in Oct.1922 commenced running between Southampton - Cherbourg - Quebec. In 1924 she was renamed "Montroyal" and her accommodation altered to carry 600-cabin and 800-3rd class passengers, returning to the Liverpool - Quebec service on 19/4/1924. In 1926 her accommodation was again altered to carry cabin, tourist and 3rd class and she made eight trips a year through 1926 and the following year was transferred to the Antwerp - Southampton - Cherbourg - Quebec route. She commenced her final voyage from Antwerp on 7/9/1929 and was then laid up after making a total of 190 round voyages on the North Atlantic. On 17/6/1930 she was sold to the Stavanger Shipbreaking Co. and was scrapped. The owner of the Sola Strand Hotel bought the lounge from the shipbreakers and incorporated it into his hotel as the Montroyal Ballroom. The beautiful woodwork is still a feature of this building which now houses the Norwegian School for Hotel Management. [North Atlantic Seaway, vol.3,p.1309] [Canadian Pacific by George Musk] [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 2 November 1997]


EMPRESS OF BRITAIN (2)
The turbine ship EMPRESS OF BRITAIN (II) was built for the Canadian Pacific Line by John Brown & Co Ltd, Glasgow (ship #530), keel laid 28 November 1928, launched 11 June 1930. 42,348 tons; 231,8 x 29,7 meters (length x breadth); 3 funnels, 2 masts, cruiser stern; quadruple-screw propulsion (single-reciprocating steam turbine engines), service speed 24 knots (maximum 25.5 knots); passenger accommodation: 465 in 1st class, 260 in tourist class, and 470 in 3rd class; crew of 740. 27 May 1931, maiden voyage, Southampton-Cherbourg-Quebec. May-June 1931, record passages, Cherbourg-Father Point (both ways). May 1936, passenger accommodation: cabin, tourist, 3rd class. 17 June 1939, transported King George VI and Queen Elizabeth from St. John's, Newfoundland, to Southampton after their Canadian tour. 2 September 1939, last voyage, Southampton-Quebec (100 roundtrip voyages on the North Atlantic). 25 November 1939, troop transport. 26 October 1940, bombed and set on fire by German aircraft 70 miles northwest of Ireland; taken in tow by the Polish destroyer BURZA; 28 October 1940, torpedoed twice by German U-Boot U32 at 55.16 N 09.50 W; 49 dead [Noel Reginald Pixell Bonsor, North Atlantic Seaway; An Illustrated History of the Passenger Services Linking the Old World with the New (2nd ed.; Jersey, Channel Islands: Brookside Publications), vol. 3 (1979), , pp. 1298 (photograph) and 1319, vol. 5 (1980), p. 1835 (photograph);; Arnold Kludas, Die grossen Passagierschiffe der Welt; Eine Dokumentation,Bd. 3: 1924-1935 (Oldenburg/Hamburg: Gerhard Stalling, c1973), pp. 166-167 (photograph)].. - [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 11 March 1998]


EMPRESS OF CANADA
The turbine ship EMPRESS OF CANADA was built by Fairfield Co Ltd, Glasgow (ship #528), and launched for the Canadian Pacific Line on 17 August 1920. 21,517 tons; 191,10 (199,02) x 23,74 meters/627 (653) x 77.9 feet (length x breadth); 3 funnels, 2 masts, clipper stern; twin-screw propulsion (steam turbine, single-reduction engines), service speed 18 knots, 20 maximum; passenger accommodation: 488 in 1st class, 106 in 2nd class, 238 in 3rd class, and 926 in steerage (Asian voyages); crew of 530. 5 May 1922, maiden voyage, Falmouth-Suez Canal-Hong Kong-Vancouver; then in the Vancouver-Yokahama service. 1 November 1928, sailed Vancouver- Glasgow; single-reduction steam turbine engines replaced by double- reduction steam turbines. 28 August 1929, 1 roundtrip voyage, Southampton-Cherbourg-Quebec. 18 September 1929, sailed Southampton- Cherbourg-New York-Panama Canal-Vancouver; returned to Vancouver-Yokahama service. 29 November 1939, troop transport. 14 March 1943, bound from Durban to England, torpedoed and sunk by the Italian submarine LEONARDO DA VINCI, at lat 01 13 S, lon 09 57, approximately 400 miles south of Cape Palmas, West Africa; 392 lives lost [Arnold Kludas, Die grossen Passagierschiffe der Welt; Eine Dokumentation, Bd. 2: 1913-1923 (2nd ed.; Oldenburg/Hamburg: Gerhard Stalling, c1973), pp. 146-147 (2 photographs); Noel Reginald Pixell Bonsor, North Atlantic Seaway; An Illustrated History of the Passenger Services Linking the Old World with the New (2nd ed.; Jersey, Channel Islands: Brookside Publications), vol. 2 (1978), p. 1318]. - [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 10 March 1998]


EMPRESS OF CHINA
See PRINZ FRIEDRICH WILHELM.


EMPRESS OF FRANCE (1)
The first "Empress of France" was built by Wm Beardmore & Co Ltd.,Glasgow in 1913 as the "Alsatian" for the Allan Line. She was an 18,481 gross ton ship, length 571.4ft x beam 72.4ft, two funnels, two masts, four screws and a speed of 18 knots. She was the first North Atlantic liner with a cruiser stern. There was accommodation for 287-1st, 504-2nd and 848-3rd class passengers. Launched on 22/3/1913 as the "Alsatian" she left Liverpool on her maiden voyage to St John NB for the Allan Line on 17/1/1914. On 22/5/1914 she commenced her first Liverpool - Quebec voyage and on 17/7/1914 started her last voyage on this service. On 7/8/1914 she became an Armed Merchant Cruiser and joined the 10th Cruiser Squadron patrolling off the Shetland Islands. She became flagship for Admiral De Chair and later for Vice Admiral Tucker and was one of the first ships to be fitted with the new wireless direction finding apparatus. After the squadron was retired in 1917, she was returned to Canadian Pacific Ocean Services, who now managed the combined Allan line and Canadian Pacific fleets. On 28/9/1918 she commenced her first voyage from Liverpool to Canada and after a second voyage on this service, was refitted at Glasgow. She was renamed "Empress of France" on 4/4/1919 and on 26th Sept. that year commenced her first voyage under her new name from Liverpool to Quebec. On 3/5/1922 she commenced sailing between Southampton, Cherbourg and Quebec and on 31/5/1922 between Hamburg, Southampton, Cherbourg and Quebec. In 1924 she was converted from coal to oil fuel, and in July 1926 her accommodation became 1st, 2nd, tourist and 3rd class and was altered again Jan.1927 to 1st, tourist and 3rd class. On 29/9/1927 she started her last Hamburg - Southampton - Cherbourg - Quebec voyage and on 8/9/1928, her last Southampton - Cherbourg - Quebec voyage. On 31/10/1928 she left Southampton for Suez, Hong Kong and Vancouver and subsequently sailed on the Pacific until 17/10/1929 when she left Hong Kong for Liverpool. She started her final voyage from Southampton to Cherbourg and Quebec on 2/9/1931 and in Sept. of that year was laid up in the Clyde. She was scrapped at Dalmuir on 20/10/1934. In total, she had made 99 Atlantic voyages, 5 trans-Pacific, and 8 cruises as well as her war service. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.3,p.1313] [Canadian Pacific - 100 years by George Musk] [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 24 November 1997]


EMPRESS OF FRANCE (2)
See DUCHESS OF BEDFORD.


EMPRESS OF INDIA
See PRINZ FRIEDRICH WILHELM.


EMPRESS OF IRELAND
The "Empress of Ireland" was involved in one of the worst peacetime shipping disasters of all time. She was a 14,191 gross ton ship, built by Fairfield Shipbuilding & Engineering Co.Ltd, Glasgow in 1906 for the Canadian Pacific Railway Co, which later became CP Ships. Her details were - length 548.9ft x beam 65.7ft, two funnels, two masts, twin screw and a speed of 18 knots. There was accommodation for 310-1st, 470-2nd and 750-3rd class passengers. She was a sister ship to the first "Empress of Britain". Launched on 27/1/1906, she sailed from Liverpool on her maiden voyage to Quebec on 29/6/1906. She made a total of 95 round voyages on the North Atlantic service, but on 29/5/1914, she was sunk in collision. The collision occurred at approx 2.30am when most of the 1,054 passengers and 413 crew were asleep. A few hours out of Quebec, while in the St Lawrence River, she was rammed and sunk by the 6,000 ton Norwegian collier "Storstad". In less than 15 minutes the liner sank with the loss of 1014 lives, including a large contingent of Salvation Army delegates who were on their way to a conference in the UK, and within four miles of the riverbank. Over 400 were saved by the "Eureka" and the "Lady Evelyn". There was much conflicting evidence given at the subsequent enquiry, but it was established that the two vessels had sighted each other when more than three miles apart, before fog descended rapidly. When next seen, the collier, having altered course, was only feet away and collision was unavoidable. In 1964, the wreck was located by skin divers and many items from the wreck were salved and are now preserved at the Musee Maritime Bernier, L'Islet, Quebec. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.3,p.1309] [Canadian Pacific 100 years by George Musk} [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 12 November 1997]


EMPRESS OF RUSSIA
The turbine ship EMPRESS OF RUSSIA was built for the Canadian Pacific Line by Fairfield Co Ltd, Glasgow (ship #484), and launched on 28 August 1912. 16,810 tons; 180,4 x 20,8 meters (length x breadth); 3 funnels, 2 masts; cruiser stern; quadruple-screw propulsion (turbine engines), service speed 20 knots (21.2 knots maximum); accommodation for 284 passengers in 1st class, 100 in 2nd class, and 808 in steerage; crew of 475. 1 April 1913, maiden voyage, Liverpool-Suez Canal-Hong Kong-Vancouver; then placed in the Vancouver-Yokohama service. 23 August 1914, placed in service as an auxiliary cruiser. 12 February 1916, returned to passenger service in the Pacific. 6 May 1918, troop transport. 6 July-12 November 1918, New York-Liverpool (3 1/2 roundtrip voyages). 12 January 1919, sailed Liverpool-Suez Canal-Hong Kong; refurbished; passenger accommodations: 350 in 1st class, 70 in 2nd class, 90 in 3rd class, 728 in steerage. 28 November 1940, troop transport. 8 September 1945, gutted by fire while at Barrow in Furness for repairs and rebuilding. 1946, scrapped by T. W. Ward, Barrow-in-Furness [Noel Reginald Pixell Bonsor, North Atlantic Seaway; An Illustrated History of the Passenger Services Linking the Old World with the New (2nd ed.; Jersey, Channel Islands: Brookside Publications), vol. 3 (1979), p. 1313; Arnold Kludas, Die grossen Passagierschiffe der Welt; Eine Dokumentation, Bd. 1: 1858-1912 (2nd ed.; Oldenburg/Hamburg: Gerhard Stalling, c1972), pp. 204-205 (2 photographs)]. - [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 11 March 1998]

The "Empress of Russia" was built by Fairfield & Co, Govan in 1912 for Canadian Pacific, she was a 16,810 gross ton ship, length 570ft x beam 68ft, three funnels, two masts, twin screw and a speed of 19 knots. There was accommodation for 284-1st, 100-2nd and 800-steerage class passengers. Launched on 28.8.1912, she sailed on her maiden voyage from Liverpool for Hong Kong on 1/4/1913. She then commenced sailings to Vancouver via Shanghai, Nagasaki, Kobe, and Yokohama. On 22.8.1914 she was requisitioned at Hong Kong and converted to an Armed Merchant Cruiser. Used to blockade German merchant ships in the Philippines, and later transferred to the Indian Ocean. On 13.11.1914 she met the Australian cruiser HMAS Sydney and took aboard 230 survivors from the German cruiser "Emden" and was later used for patrol duties in the Red Sea. She was paid off at Bombay in October 1915 and returned to Hong Kong for refit before being returned to the Pacific service on 12.2.1916. In 1918 she was requisitioned again and used to transport US troops across the Atlantic, and finally left Liverpool on 12.1.1919 for Havre, and Suez to Hong Kong. She then returned to the trans Pacific service and made 310 crossings before being again requisitioned in 1940 as a troopship. She was used on the UK - Freetown - Cape Town - Suez route and returned via Cape Town - Newport News and Halifax to bring Canadian troops to England. In 1943 she was used to support the North Africa landings and later the same year made a special voyage to Gothenburg to exchange prisoners of war. After various trooping duties, she was laid up at Gareloch until June 1945 when she was sent to Barrow in Furness to be refitted for the repatriation of Canadian troops after the war. However, on 8th September she was gutted by fire, declared a total loss and scrapped. [Canadian Pacific-100 Years by George Musk] - [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 12 March 1998}


EMPRESS OF SCOTLAND
See KAISERIN AUGUSTE VICTORIA.


EMPRESS QUEEN
There was an "Empress Queen" built in 1897 for the Isle of Man Steam Packet Co. and there is a model of this ship owned by the City of Liverpool Maritime Museum. I don't know if this is the same ship, but it seems likely. P&A Campbell of Bristol also had a ship of this name but I think it was a much later vessel. - [Posted to the ShipsList bt Ted Finch - 10 March 1998]

The cargo steamship EMPRESS QUEEN was built by Fairfield, of Govan, Glasgow, in 1897. 1,995 tons; 360.1 x 42.3 x 17 feet (length x breadth x depth of hold); compound diagonal engines (1,290 horsepower). She belonged to the Isle of Man Steam Packet Co in 1916. On 1 February 1916, she was wrecked at Bembridge Ledge, Isle of Wight, while on a voyage from Havre to Southampton carrying a cargo of ammunition [Charles Hocking, Dictionary of Disasters at Sea During the Age of Steam, Including sailing ships and ships of war lost in action, 1824-1962 (London: Lloyd's Register of Shipping, 1969), vol. 1, p. 222]. - [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 10 March 1998]


EMS
The EMS was built by John Elder & Co., Glasgow, for Norddeutscher Lloyd (North German Lloyd). 4,730 tons; 130,99 x 14,32 meters (429.8 x 47 feet; length x beam); straight bow, 2 funnels, 4 masts; iron construction, screw propulsion, service speed 16 knots; accommodation for 125 1st-, 130 2nd-, and 1,000 3rd-class passengers. 27 February 1884, launched. 4 June 1884, maiden voyage, Bremen-Southampton-New York. 1896, masts reduced to two. 14 March 1896, last voyage, Bremen -Southampton-New York. 16 April 1896, first voyage, Genoa-Naples-New York. 25 October 1900, last voyage, Genoa-Naples- New York. 1901, purchased by the Elder Dempster Line and renamed LAKE SIMCOE. 20 August 1901, first voyage, Liverpool-Quebec-Montreal. 4 March 1903, last voyage, Liverpool-St. John, New Brunswick. 18 August 1903, first voyage, chartered by Canadian Pacific, Liverpool-Quebec-Montreal (1 roundtrip voyage). September 1905, sold; scrapped at Genoa [Noel Reginald Pixell Bonsor, North Atlantic Seaway; An Illustrated History of the Passenger Services Linking the Old World with the New (2nd ed.; Jersey, Channel Islands: Brookside Publications), vol. 2, p. 552]. Pictured in Michael J. Anuta, Ships of Our Ancestors (Menominee, MI:Ships of Our Ancestors, 1983), p. 93, courtesy of Mystic Seaport Museum, 50 Greenmanville Ave., Mystic, CT 06355-0990. Also pictured in Clas Broder Hansen, Passenger Liners from Germany, 1816-1990, translated by Edward Force (West Chester, Pennsylvania: Schiffer Publishing, c1991), p. 34. [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer]


ENGLAND
The "England" of 1871 was an iron vessel built by Palmer Bros.& Co. at Jarrow-on-Tyne in 1865 for the National Line of Liverpool. Her dimensions were 3308 gross tons, length 375.5ft x beam 42.5ft, clipper stem, one funnel, three masts, single screw and a speed of 10 knots. Accommodation for 80-1st and 800 3rd class passengers. She was launched on 24.6.1865 and left Liverpool on her maiden voyage on 7.2.1866 for Queenstown [Cobh] and New York. In 1867 she was used as a transport ship in the Abyssian campaign and in 1873-4 was lengthened to 437.9ft, engines compounded and became 4898 tons. She resumed the Liverpool - Queenstown - NY service on 26.8.1874 and stayed on this run until making her last voyage on 2.1.1891 from Liverpool to NY. On 1.3.1891 she commenced running from London - NY until making her last trip on 10.1.1896. She was then sold and scrapped in Italy.[Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Ted Finch - 15 August 1997]


ENRIQUE LIHN
See CHEMNITZ (1) .


EPTANISOS
See HANSA (2).


ERATO (1)
Call sign: RDPW. Master: Captain Schmidt. Rigging: Bark made of wood. Tonnage: 665 tons gross, 641 tons net and 596 tons under deck.. 150.9 feet in length, 32.5 feet in breadth and 19.1 feet in depth.. Built in 1873 by Wencke in Hamburg.. Owners: B. Wencke Sohne. Port of registry: Hamburg. [Lloyd's Register of Shipping 1887-88] - [Posted to The ShipsList by Gilbert Provost - 25 August 1998]


ERATO (2)
Call sign: WFSD. Official #: 49878. Master: Captain Green, appointed to the company and to the ship 1886.. Rigging: Sail ship made of iron. 2 decks. 1 bulkhead cemented. Tonnage: 1,205 tons gross and 1,116 under deck.. 206 feet in length, 35.3 feet in breadth and 23.1 feet in depth. Poop deck 62 feet long and Forecastle 38 feet long.. Built by Ramsey Ship. Co. on the Isle of Man. Owners: Foley & Co. Port of registry: London.[Lloyd's Register of Shipping 1887-88] - [Posted to The ShipsList by Gilbert Provost - 25 August 1998]


ERICSSON
There is an excellent, detailed history of the ERICSSON in the late Cedric Ridgely-Nevitt's American Steamships on the Atlantic (Newark: University of Delaware Press, c1981), pp. 208-215, from which the following account is largely derived. The ERICSSON was built by Perrine, Patterson, and Stack, of Williamsburg, New York; keel laid April 1852, launched 15 September 1852. 1,902 tons; 253 ft 6 in x 39 ft 8 in by 26 ft 6 in (length x breadth x depth of hold); wood construction; side-paddle wheels 32 ft in diameter, with 28 buckets, each 10 ft x 20 in. The vessel was named after the famous Swedish inventor John Ericsson, who designed her "caloric" (hot air) engines. The machinery, which was built by Hogg & Delameter, is described as consisting of four working cylinders ... 168 inches in diameter by ... 6 feet stroke, and above them four air-compressing cylinders ... 137 inches in diameter by 6 fee stroke. The working cylinders, arranged in pairs along the centre of the vessel, were suspended like enormous camp-kettles over the furnace fires. Eight piston rods, each ... 14 feet long, connected the mammoth pistons of each set of cylinders [Noel Reginald Pixell Bonsor, North Atlantic Seaway; An Illustrated History of the Passenger Services Linking the Old World with the New (2nd ed.; Jersey, Channel Islands: Brookside Publications), vol. 1 (1975), p. 334]. There was no figurehead, but the stern carried a figure of Ericsson being crowned with a laurel wreath by two allegorical figures representing the United States and Great Britain. On the spar deck were the sailors' and firemen's quarters in the forecastle, and, in other deckhouses, the dining saloon, pantry, library, smoking room, and officers' rooms. Below decks were 64 staterooms for 130 passengers, all finished in Gothic style with white woodwork and "chaste" gilding. There was also space for 12 passengers' servants in the hold, forward of the engine room. There were two masts, brig-rigged, and four small stacks, two for smoke, two for air exhaust, arranged two abreast and painted white with gold tops. The small size of the stacks gave the vessel an "unfinished" appearance. When first complete, the total cost of the ERICSSON was figured at $320,000, the engines accounting for $130,000 of this. Despite his contemporary fame as a designer of engines, Ericsson never designed a creditable engine for any large steamship (he was too impatient to increase sizes gradually and to correct his past mistakes as he went along, and it was always someone else who footed the bill when his designs did not live up to his promises). At the vessel's initial builder's trials on 4 and 5 January 1853, and a public trial, under the command of Alfred B. Lowber, who owned 5 of her original 50 shares, on 11 January 1853, the engines generated only 250 horsepower (against the promised 600) and she achieved a hopelessly slow speed of 6 1/2 knots (against the predicted 8 to 10). After a visit on 15 February 1853 to Norfolk, Virginia, where the ship was Visited by President Fillmore, President-elect Pierce, and delegations from both houses of Congress, the original cylinders were replaced by two new, double-acting inclined ones of 72 inch bore and 8 foot stroke. After several unsatisfactory trials, Ericsson claimed a speed of 11 knots on 27 April 1854. Unfortunately, on the return voyage from Sandy Hook, while cargo ports on the lower deck were open, the ERICSSON was struck by a sudden squall; the vessel heeled over, water poured in, and she sank to the bottom of the Hudson River off the Cunard Line docks at Jersey City. Because the water was relatively shallow it was possible to close the ports and pump her out, and by 12 May 1854 she had been refloated and towed to a pier in the East River. At this point, John B. Kitching, the wealthy young New Yorker who was the principal owner of the ERICSSON (30 of 50 shares--Ericsson himself owned no part of the vessel) decided that he could no longer underwrite Ericsson's novel propulsion schemes, and had the caloric engines removed, replacing them with a more conventional steam plant (two inclined cylinders of 62 inch bore by 7 foot 8 inch stroke), also, unfortunately, designed by Ericsson; the vessel did not lose her unusual, "unfinished" appearance, since, although the new steam engines required only two stacks, all four of the original stacks were retained, two of them now "dummies" serving as engine-room ventilators. New trials on 8 May 1855 logged a speed of 11 knots, a speed which, however, as later experience would prove, could not be maintained on the open sea against wind and waves. The ERICSSON was then placed in service. The year 1855 was a good one for a new steamship to begin her career, since Paris was holding a grand Exhibition, and with most of the foreign liners engaged in Crimean War service there was much demand for passenger space. Kitching therefore advertised the ERICSSON as sailing directly from New York to Havre, carrying only first-cabin passengers, at a fare of $130, the same fare charged by the Havre Line. She sailed from New York on her maiden voyage, on 16 June 1855, and arrived at Havre on 30 June, in a very slow 14 days 4 hours, having done just over 10 knots on her best day; she returned to New York on 22 August 1855, after an even slower passage of 17 days. Kitching, realizing that the ERICSSON was too slow to compete with the monthly sailings of the faster Havre Line or the cheap fares of Vanderbilt's European Line, thereupon shifted her to Bremen, where he hoped that the WASHINGTON and the HERMANN would provide less competition. Despite the increased distance, he reduced the fare to $120, or $80 for second-cabin. The ERICSSON sailed from New York on 15 September, reaching Cowes in 14 days, a sea speed of a little over 9 knots. After her return, Kitching returned her to Havre for two voyages, sailing from New York on 21 November 1855 and 25 January 1856. Kitching was operating the ERICSSON at a loss, and therefore, on 13 March 1856, chartered her to the Collins Line, who in order to maintain their fortnightly mail service required another steamer to replace the PACIFIC, which had vanished without a trace. In the next year and a half, the ERICSSON made 11 voyages for the Collins Line. She was the slowest vessel in the line, and on her later voyages mail payments were reduced because of her inadequate speed. Her lack of speed also made her unpopular with with traveling public: on her first passage from Liverpool to New York (arrived 1 May 1856) she carried just 38 passengers, and when she arrived back at New York on 6 August 1857, on the return leg of her eleventh and last voyage for the Collins Line, she carried only 12. Her owners returned the ERICSSON to the Bremen service for a single voyage, sailing from New York on 16 September 1857, carrying three classes of passengers at fares of $80, $50, and $30. Because of her low horsepower and moderate fuel consumption, she sailed directly to Bremen, without stopping at either Cowes of Southampton for coal. A second voyage was advertised, but the ERICSSON was laid up for the winter. In the spring, her agents advertised a "pleasure voyage" from New York on 1 May 1858, to Gibraltar, Malta, Alexandria, Jaffa, Constantinople, Athens, Naples, and home, for $750, but there was insufficient interest, and she sailed again for Bremen on 8 May, arriving back at New York on 20 June 1858. The ERICSSON's owners then gave up attempting to find regular employment for her as a passenger vessel. She made a special voyage to take the New York Seventh Regiment to City Point, on the James River, came home empty, and was laid up for the next three years. On 7 October 1861, the ERICSSON was chartered, for $1,200 per day, by the U.S. Army's Quartermaster Corps, as one of 23 steam transports sailing with Samuel F. DuPont's invasion fleet headed for Port Royal, South Carolina. Despite the Civil War's demand for steamships, however, she was employed by the U.S. Army for only 21 of the 46 months during which she was available. She was returned to her owners (now listed as Edward Dunham & Co, who had been her managers since 1855) on 13 March 1865. Shortly afterwards, the ERICSSON was chartered by Marshall O. Roberts as a temporary replacement for the GOLDEN RULE (which had been wrecked on Roncador Reef in May 1865) on the New York-Greytown leg of his North American Steamship Co's New York-Nicaragua-San Francisco service. The ERICSSON made four voyages under this charter, at monthly intervals, the first clearing New York on 20 July 1865, the last arriving at New York on 22 November 1865. The ERICSSON was then sent to the Sectional Dock in New York for repairs. Roberts had purchased a much faster vessel, the SANTIAGO DE CUBA. The ERICSSON was then chartered by the North American Lloyd Steamship Co, which ran a steerage service between Bremen and New York, to replace that line's WESTERN METROPOLIS, which was plagued with mechanical problems. She made two voyages for the line, the first departing from New York on 15 March 1866, via Cowes, and reaching New York again on 2 May (the voyage on which your ancestor traveled), the second departing from New York on 24 May, via Cowes, and reaching New York again, also via Cowes, on 27 July 1866. Immediately thereafter, the ERICSSON was chartered by the Continental Mail Steamship Co, for their brief Antwerp service. The ERICSSON made one voyage, and an equally slow screw steamer, the CIRCASSIAN, a second voyage, before the service was abandoned; fares were $90, $62.50, and $37.50, and the Channel port was Havre. The ERICSSON sailed from New York on 23 August 1866, and arrived back, with 350 passengers, on 16 October, after a passage of 20 days. At the age of 13 years, after only 20 voyages across the Atlantic and four to Nicaragua, the ERICSSON was offered for sale. After failing to find a buyer for five months, on 14 August 1867, she was put up for auction. She was purchased by W. W. Sherman, who removed her engines and rebuilt and rerigged her as a three-masted sailing ship. Although she was a slow steamship, she proved to be exceptionally fast under sail: indeed, she was faster under sail than she had been under steam. On her first voyage under sail, she cleared New York on 17 February 1868, arriving at Liverpool in 17 days. From there, on 6 May, she sailed for San Francisco, arriving on 23 August, after a passage of 109 days; on 15 October she departed for Liverpool, which she reached in 103 days. These three consecutive runs are an outstanding, and possibly even unbeaten, record. Ridgely-Nevitt summarizes the ERICSSON's later career as follows (p. 215): From 1868 through 1875 the ERICSSON was engaged in the grain trade between San Francisco and Liverpool, with a voyage via Callao, Peru, to Mejillones and another to Newcastle, New South Wales, in Australia. An 1876 trip made Manila and Iloilo, in the Philippines, with a return to New York. The years 1878 and 1879 saw her in the coastwise trade from San Francisco to Puget Sound ports. In 1880 came a second Australian visit and one to Shanghai the following year. The years 1882 and 1883 were spent coastwise, and 1884 saw her last call at Liverpool. Further Australian trips, including Sydney and Melbourne, as well as Newcastle, were made in 1886 and 1888. In 1889 she went South to Valparaiso. Most of her sailings were coastwise from 1889 to 1892. There were several changes of ownership and successive home ports were New York, Boston, and San Francisco. Late in the 1880's, George Plummer, who had long been her master, acquired her. On 19 November 1892, en route from San Francisco to Nanaimo, she went ashore during a gale on Entrance Island, near Barclay Sound, British Columbia; there was no loss of life. - [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 10 June 1998]


ERIDANO
See EDINBURGH.


ERIN
The "Erin" was a 3,325 gross ton ship, length 370.4ft x beam 41.1ft, clipper stem, one funnel, three masts (rigged for sail), iron construction, single screw and a speed of 10 knots. Built by Palmer Bros & Co, Jarrow-on-Tyne, for the National Line, she was launched on 18/6/1864. She sailed from Liverpool on her maiden voyage to Queenstown (Cobh) and New York on 2/8/1864 and in 1865 carried the survivors of the burnt out Inman Liner "Glasgow" to New York. She commenced her first London - Havre - New York voyage on 25/6/1871. In 1872 she was rebuilt to 3,956 tons and in 1873 was fitted with compound engines by J.Penn & Son, London. She started her last London - New York voyage on 24/9/1876 and in 1876-77 was lengthened to 418.8ft, 4,577 tons, her saloon cabins rebuilt amidships, and with accommodation for 72-1st and 1,200-3rd class passengers. On 4/7/1877 she resumed the Liverpool - Queenstown - New York service and on 28/10/1879 commenced her last crossing on this route. She resumed London - New York sailings on 17/12/1879 and on 31/12/1889 left New York for London but went missing with the loss of 72 lives. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.2,p.611] - [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 15 March 1998]


ERINPURA
The 1926-27 Lloyd's Register of Shipping provides the following: ERINPURA Call sign : KPWS Official # : 132998 Rigging : steel twin screw Schooner ; 2 decks; steel upper deck sheathed with wood and steel shade deck sheathed with teak; 7 bulkheads, 6 to upper deck and 1 to second deck; flat keel; water ballast : cellular double bottom Aft 89 feet long, under engine and boilers 116 feet long and forward 160 feet long, 740 tons. Forward Peak Tank 95 tons, Aft Peak Tank 63 tons; fitted with electric light and wireless. Tonnage : 5,128 tons gross, 3,725 under deck and 2,759 net. Dimensions : 411 feet long, 52.5 foot beam and 24.7 foot draught. Shade Deck 177 feet long. Built in 1911 by W. Denny & Bros. in Dumbarton. Owners : British India Steam Navigation Co. Ltd. Propulsion : triple-expansion engine with 6 cylinders of 24 in., 41 in. and 69 in. diameter per pair. Stroke 48 inches. 1,059 nominal horsepower. 2 double ended and 2 single ended boilers, 18 corrugated furnaces, grate surface 381 square feet, heating surface 16,080 square feet; forced draught. Engine built by same company as the hull. Port of registry : Glasgow Flag : British - [Posted to The ShipsList by Gilbert Provost - 23 September 1998]

The "Erinpura" carried 51-1st, 39-2nd class and 1,500 passengers on deck, and had a crew of 120. She was launched on 9th Oct.1911 and handed over to British India S.N.Co on 6th Dec. She was used on the Calcutta - Rangoon and Madras - Rangoon - Singapore service until 16th Sept.1914 when she boarded troops at Karachi and joined a large convoy for Marseilles. She then trooped to Iraq and in 1915 was engaged in trooping between Marseilles and Port Said. In 1916 she was converted to a hospital ship with 475 beds and 104 medical staff and was used mainly between Basra and Bombay. From Nov.1917 to Jun.1919 she was employed as an ambulance transport, mainly on the same route. On 6th Jun.1919 she went aground on Mushejera Reef in the Red Sea and was salvaged by cutting off the bow section and towing the stern portion to Bombay. A new bow was built by Denny & Bros, Dumbarton, towed to Bombay and joined to the stern at Mazagon Dockyard. She returned to her pre-war service in 1920, but was again taken up fot trooping in the 1939-45 war. On 1st May 1943 she left Alexandria for Malta with 1,025 troops aboard in convoy with 25 other ships and guarded by 11 warships. Attacked by bombers off Benghazi, she was hit and sank with the loss of 600 Basuto Pioneer Corps troops, together with 57 crew and 7 gunners. [Merchant Fleets by Duncan Haws, vol.11, British India S.N.Co] - [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 24 September 1998]


ERNST MORITZ ARNDT (1)
The ERNST MORITZ ARNDT was a 3-masted, square-rigged ship, built by the shipbuilding firm of Hermann Friedrich Ulrichs, Vegesack/Fahr, for the Bremen firm of F. & E. Delius, and launched on 23 October 1847. 273 Commerzlasten/670 tons register; 37,6 x 9,8 x 6 meters (length x breadth x depth of hold). The maiden voyage of the ERNST MORITZ ARNDT, under Capt. Albert Haake, was plagued with difficulties. She set sail on 20 December 1847 for Hartlepool, to load a cargo of coal for Cuba. She reached Hartlepool on 25 December 1847, but did not sail from that port until 4 February 1848. Two weeks later, on 18 February 1848, she was damaged off Land's End, Cornwall, and was forced to return to Southampton for repairs. She sailed from Southampton on 15 April 1848, and reached Havana a month later. She returned to Bremerhaven by way of Baltimore, which she reached on 31 July 1848 and left only at the end of October, on 1 December 1848, almost a year after first setting out. Albert Haake was succeeded as captain of the ERNST MORITZ ARNDT by Luder Rust (1853), Friedrich Harde (1854), Luder Rust (1855), Friedrich Harde (1857), and Ferdinand Haesloop, of Vegesack (1858), who commanded her on her voyage to New Orleans in 1860/61. The vessel remained in the possession of various firms owned by the Delius family until she was "sold Norwegian" in 1864, and renamed RJUKAN. She remained in service another 23 years until, in April 1887, under Capt. Andreasen (owners: O. P. Moe & Son, of Christiansand), bound from Newport, Wales, to Quebec, she was abandoned at sea. The crew was saved and landed at Le Havre [Peter-Michael Pawlik, Von der Weser in die Welt; Die Geschichte der Segelschiffe von Weser und Lesum und ihrer Bauwerften 1770 bis 1893, Schriften des Deutschen Schiffahrtsmuseums, Bd. 33 (Hamburg: Kabel, c1993), p. 273]. - [Email from Michael Palmer to Gerry Meier - Submitted by Gerry Meier 25 February 1998]


ERNST MORITZ ARNDT (2)
See HABANA.


ESKIMO
The "Eskimo" belonged to Ellerman's Wilson Line. They were North Sea and Baltic traders running to Hull where your ancestor would have taken a train to (probably) Liverpool to board a transatlantic liner to New York. I don't have a lot of information on the "Eskimo" but she was built by Earle's of Hull in 1910, Had two funnels and two masts, and was captured off Risor in Norwegian territorial waters while serving as an armed merchant cruiser in July 1916.[Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Ted Finch - 10 September 1997]


ESMERALDA
The ESMERALDA was a 3-masted, square-rigged ship, 907 tons, built in Brunswick, Maine, in 1849, by Robert McManus, who also served as her first master. She ran in Williams & Guion's Black Star Line of packets between New York and Liverpool in 1850, and, under George W. McManus, in the Blue Ball Line of New York-Liverpool packets in 1852. Originally registered at Brunswick, Maine, she received her first New York certificate of registry on 30 September 1854 [William Armstrong Fairburn, Merchant Sail (Center Lovell, ME: Fairburn marine Educational Foundation, [1945-55]), V.3303; Carl C. Cutler, Queens of the Western Ocean; The Story of America's Mail and Passenger Sailing Lines (Annapolis: United States Naval Institute, c1961), pp. 385 and 388; Forrest R. Holdcamper, comp., List of American-flag Merchant Vessels that received Certificates of Enrollment or Registry at the Port of New York, 1789-1867 (Record Groups 41 and 36), National Archives Publication 68-10, Special Lists 22 (Washington, DC: National Archives and Records Service, 1968), p. 219]. I do not at present know anything of the later history or ultimate fate of the ESMERALDA. However, if she survived until at least 1857 there should be a record of her in the annual volumes of American Lloyd's Registry of American and Foreign Shipping (begun as the New York Marine Register, title changed the following year), and if she survived until 1867 there should also be a record of her in both the annual Record of American and Foreign Shipping, published by the American Shipmasters' Association (later the American Bureau of Shipping, a voluntary "classification" society, equivalent to Lloyd's or the Bureau Veritas), and in the annual volumes of the List of Merchant Vessels of the United States, published by the Treasury Department (later, in turn, by the Bureau of Navigation, the Bureau of Marine Inspection and Navigation, and the Bureau of Customs). The most collection of all three of these registers is held by the
Mariners' Museum, 100 Museum Drive, Newport News, VA 23606-3798,, whom you should contact for further information. [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 8 December 1997]


ESPAGNE
ESPAGNE - Built in 1909 by Chantiers & Ateliers de Provence, Port de Bouc for Compagnie Generale Transatlantique(French Line). 11,155 gross tons, length 537.8ft x beam 60.8ft, two funnels, two masts, twin screw and a speed of 15 knots. There was accommodation for 296-1st, 106-2nd and 500-3rd class passengers. Launched on 19th Dec.1909, she started her maiden voyage on 5th Oct.1910 when she left St Nazaire for the West Indies. On 11th Feb.1911 she commenced her first Havre - New York sailing and made 39 round voyages on this service, the last starting on 5th Jul.1919. She was scrapped at St Nazaire in 1934. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P. Bonsor, vol.2, p.660] - [Email From Ted Finch - 13 October 1998]


ESPERANCE BAY
The "Esperance Bay" was built in 1922 by Vickers, Barrow for the Commonwealth Government Line as the "Hobsons Bay" and was a sister ship to the famous "Jervis Bay". She was a 13,837 gross ton ship, length 549ft x beam 68.2ft, one funnel, two masts, twin screw and a speed of 15 knots. There was accommodation for 12 government sponsored 1st class passengers and 720-3rd class. There was also refrigerated cargo space for 360,000 cubic feet of frozen meat. Launched on 4th October 1921, she sailed from London on her maiden voyage to Brisbane on 28th February 1922. In 1928 she was sold to the White Star Line, registered at London, managed by the Aberdeen Line and continued on the London - Australia service. Rebuilt in 1931 to 14,198 tons and with single class accommodation for 512 tourist class passengers. After the financial collapse of the Kylsant shipping organisation, to which she belonged, a new company, the Aberdeen & Commonwealth Line was formed in April 1933 to take over the remaining assets. The ships were then managed by Shaw Savill & Albion Line, but retained the green hulls and colours of the Aberdeen Line. In 1936, the original "Esperence Bay" was transferred to Shaw Savill Line and renamed "Arawa" and the "Hobsons Bay" was renamed "Esperence Bay". In September 1939 she was converted to an Armed Merchant Cruiser at Brisbane and Cape Town and in 1941 was fitted out as a troop ship. Reconditioned after the war to 14,343 tons, she resumed the London - Southampton - Malta - Port Said - Aden - Columbo - Fremantle - Melbourne - Sydney emigrant service. On July 6th 1955 she arrived at Faslane for breaking up. [North Star to Southern Cross by John M.Maber] [Great Passenger Ships of the World by Arnold Kludas, vol.2,p.174] There is a good photo of this ship in Great Passenger Ships of the World, vol.2. - [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 28 July 1998]


ESTONIA (1)
The Russian American Line ship "Estonia" was a 4,269 gross ton ship built as the "Yorkshire" for the Bibby Line. Her details were - length 400.7ft x beam 45.2ft, straight stem, one funnel, four masts, single screw and a speed of 13 knots. Built by Harland & Wolff, Belfast, she was launched on 27/7/1889 and was immediately chartered to the Anchor Line and left Liverpool on her maiden voyage to New York with cargo only, on 12/10/1889. She was chartered to the Dominion Line in 1898 and commenced her first voyage from Liverpool to Quebec and Montreal on 21/4/1898. She commenced her fifth and last voyage on this service on 8/9/1898 and in 1905 was sold to the East Asiatic Line of Denmark and renamed "Indien". In 1907 she went to the Russian American Line, was renamed "Estonia" and commenced her first Libau - Rotterdam - New York voyage on 17/6/1907. On 18/3/1912 she started her last Libau - Copenhagen - Halifax - New York crossing and was then transferred to the Far East service. On 16/1/1913 she was abandoned on fire at sea near Port Sudan and on 23/1/1913 was sunk with explosives. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.2, p.808; vol.3, p.1355] - [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 15 February 1998]


ESTONIA (2)
The "Estonia" was built as the "Czar" for the Russian American Line by Barclay, Curle & Co.Ltd, Glasgow in 1912. She was 6503 gross ton vessel, length 425ft x beam 53.2ft, two funnels, two masts, twin screw and a speed of 15 knots. There was accommodation for 30-1st, 260-2nd and 1,086-3rd class passengers. Launched on 23/3/1912 as the "Czar" for the Russian American Line, she was chartered to Cunard in 1917, and in 1921 came under the control of the Baltic American Line who renamed her "Estonia". She commenced her first voyage for this company on 11/1/1921 when she left Glasgow for New York (arr.23/1, dep.1/2), Danzig and Libau. On 23/2/1921 she sailed from Libau on her first voyage to Danzig, Boston and New York. In Feb.1925 she was rebuilt to carry 290-cabin class and 500-3rd class passengers and in March 1926 rebuilt again to accommodate 110-cabin, 180-tourist and 500-3rd class passengers. On 31/1/1930 she left Danzig on her last trip to Copenhagen, Halifax and New York and was then sold to the Gdynia America Line of Poland who renamed her "Pulaski" and ran her on their New York and South America services. She was scrapped at Blyth in 1949. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.4, p1511] There is an excellent photograph of this ship in North Atlantic Seaway , vol.4. [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Ted Finch - 16 October 1997]


ETHUCA
See CATANIA (2).


ETNA
The "Etna" was built by Caird & Co, Greenock in 1854 for the Cunard Line. She was a 2,215 gross ton ship, length 305ft x beam 37.6ft, clipper stem, one funnel, three masts (rigged for sail), iron construction, single screw and a speed of 10 knots. She was launched on 26/8/1854 and arrived at Liverpool from the Clyde on 21/1/1855. Immediately taken over for use as a Crimean War Transport and returned to Cunard in 1856. On 5/2/1856 she commenced the first of two voyages between Havre, Halifax and New York. On 24/2/1857 she sailed from Southampton for Alexandria under charter to the European & Australian R.M. Line. She started her last voyage on this service on 12/8/1857 and commenced Cunard Liverpool - New York sailings on 15/1/1859. Her last Liverpool - Halifax - Boston - New York voyage started on 29/9/1860 and she was then sold to the Inman Line. She commenced her first voyage for Inman Line on 5/12/1860 when she sailed from Liverpool for Queenstown and New York, and started her last Liverpool - Queenstown - Halifax - Boston - New York sailing on 8/10/1870. In 1871 she was rebuilt to 2,655 gross tons, lengthened to 349.4ft and fitted with compound engines by Laird Bros, Birkenhead. She was then renamed "City of Bristol". On 8/8/1871 she resumed the Liverpool - Queenstown - New York service and started her last voyage on this route on 26/8/1873. She was chartered to the American Line for a single Liverpool - Philadelphia voyage in September 1875 and on 29/10/1875 commenced a single Bordeaux - New York round voyage for Inman Line. Between 1876-79 she made three Liverpool - Philadelphia voyages for American Line, and between June 1879 and December 1880 made eight Liverpool - New York voyages. In 1881 she was sold to Italian owners and renamed "Messico", in 1883 she became the Italian "Sempione" and in 1884 the Italian "Adria". She was scrapped in Italy in 1896. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P. Bonsor, vol.1, p.144] - [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 22 April 1998]


ETOLIA
ETOLIA. Built by Harland & Wolff, Belfast in 1887 for the City of Liverpool; SN Co. She was a cargo steamer with limited passenger accommodation and was 3270 gross tons, length 345.6ft x beam 40.9ft, straight stem, one funnel, two masts, single screw and a speed of 11 knots. Launched on 8/1/1887, she was used on the Liverpool to Bombay service until 1894 when she became owned by the African SS Co. (part of Elder Dempster Co.} On 9/5/1895 she commenced running on the Avonmouth - Quebec - Montreal run and in Jan.1898 made her first voyage between Avonmouth and Boston. When Elder Dempster's North Atlantic services were taken over in 1903 by Canadian Pacific, the "Etolia" was retained by ED's and on 10/6/1906 she was wrecked near Cape Sable probably while being used on their West Africa - Canada service. [N.R.P.Bonsor - North Atlantic Seaway, Vol.3 p1212.] [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Ted Finch]


ETONIAN
See CHICAGO (4) .


ETRURIA
The steamship ETRURIA was built for the Cunard Line by John Elder & Co, Glasgow, and launched on 20 September 1884. 7,718 tons; 152,87 x 17,43 meters/501.6 x 57.2 feet (length x breadth); straight stem, 2 funnels, 3 masts; steel construction, single-screw propulsion, triple-expansion engines, service speed 19 knots; accommodation for 550 passengers in 1st class, 160 in intermediate class, and 800 in steerage. 25 April 1885, maiden voyage, Liverpool-Queenstown-New York. 1-8 August 1855, record voyage of 6 days 9 hours (18.44 knots), Sandy Hook-Queenstown. 16-22 August 1885, record voyage of 6 days 5 hours 31 minutes (18.73 knots), Queenstown-Sandy Hook. 7-14 July 1887, record voyage of 6 days 4 hours 50 minutes (19.36 knots), Sandy Hook-Queenstown. 27 May-2 June 1888, record voyage of 6 days 1 hour 55 minutes (19.56 knots), Queenstown-Sandy Hook. 1890, tonnage 8,120. 1902, lost propeller shaft in mid-Atlantic; towed to the Azores by the WILLIAM CLIFF (West India & Pacific Line), thence to Liverpool by tugs. 9 September 1908, last voyage, Liverpool-Queenstown-New York; laid up. November 1909, scrapped at Preston [Noel Reginald Pixell Bonsor, North Atlantic Seaway; An Illustrated History of the Passenger Services Linking the Old World with the New (2nd ed.; Jersey, Channel Islands: Brookside Publications), vol. 1 (1975), p. 154; vol. 5 (1980), pp. 1872-1873, 1877]. Pictured in Frank O. Braynard and William H. Miller, Jr., Picture History of the Cunard Line, 1840-1990 (New York: Dover, 1991), p. 7. - [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 17 October 1998]


EUGENIA
The "Eugenia" was a 4,835 gross ton ship, built in 1906 by Russell & Co, Port Glasgow (engines by D.Rowan & Co, Glasgow) for the Austrian owned company, Unione Austriaca of Trieste. Her details were - length 385ft x beam 49.7ft, one funnel, two masts, single screw and a speed of 12 knots. There was accommodation for 15-1st and 1,200-3rd class passengers. Launched on 7/9/1906, she sailed from Trieste on her maiden voyage to Patras, Palermo and New York on 21/2/1907. She continued Mediterranean - New York voyages until commencing her last sailing on this route on 19/7/1913. On 6/8/1917 she was torpedoed and sunk by a German submarine off SW Ireland. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P. Bonsor, vol.3, p.1330] - [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch -10 May 1998]


EUROPA (1)
The "Europa" was built in 1847 by John Wood, Port Glasgow (engines by Robert Napier, Glasgow) for the Cunard Line. She was a 1,834 gross ton ship, length 251 ft x beam 38ft, one funnel, three masts (rigged for sail), wooden construction, side paddle wheel propulsion and a service speed of 10 knots. There was capacity for 140-1st class passengers. Launched on 22/9/1847, she sailed from Liverpool on her maiden voyage to Halifax and Boston on 15/7/1848. On 2/9/1848 she commenced her first Liverpool - Halifax - New York voyage and subsequently sailed to either New York or Boston. She held the Blue Riband of the Atlantic for a while in 1848 for the fastest westbound crossing between Liverpool and Halifax of 8 days 23 hours. On 27/6/1849 she collided with and sank the US emigrant ship "Charles Bartlett" with the loss of 135 lives. Her mizzen (third) mast was removed in 1853, and in 1854 she was used as a transport ship for the Crimean War. On 14/8/1858 she collided with the Cunard ship "Arabia" off Cape Race, damaging both ships and the "Europa" put into St John's NF for repairs. On 3/2/1866 she commenced her last Liverpool - Halifax - Boston voyage and was sold the following year. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P. Bonsor, vol.1, p.142] - [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 6 July 1998]


EUROPA (2)
The EUROPA was built by the shipwright Johann Lange, of Vegesack/Grohn, for the Bremen firm of D. H. Watjen & Co, for 46,250 Taler, and launched on 25 April 1854. 374 Commerzlasten/842 tons; 44,6 x 10,2 x 7,3 meters (length x beam x depth of hold). The EUROPA belonged to D. H. Watjen & Co from 1854 to 1867, during which period her masters were, in turn, W. Ihno Ariaans, B. von Hagen, and Hermann Sanders. From 1854 to 1857, the EUROPA was engaged in transporting emigrants to North America, returning to Europe with cargoes of tobacco and cotton. In 1857, the EUROPA sailed with a cargo of coal from Cardiff to Bombay, and she remained in East Indian/Asian waters until the beginning of 1860, calling at Calcutta, Bassein, Singapore, Hong Kong, Macao, Canton, and Shanghai. In February 1860, she arrived at Sydney with 500 Chinese passengers. From Sydney she sailed for Callao, where she loaded a cargo of guano for Mauritius, where she loaded a cargo of sugar and hemp for Hull. She then returned to the tobacco and cotton trade between Europe and North America, making in addition several voyages from New York to Callao. In 1867, the EUROPA returned to Germany, where she was sold for 20,000 Taler to Johann Friedrich Arens of Bremen, who owned her until 1887, and who re-rigged her as a bark early in the 1870's. During this period her masters were, in turn, F. W. P. A. Pichler, A. Brinkmann, N. Brinkama, and B. G. Kimme. In 1884, the EUROPA was sold to Johan Ingemansson, from Elleholm, Sweden, who placed her under the command of Captain Hans Gylfert Kullenberg. On 17 November 1887, the EUROPA, Capt. Soderlund, sailed from Miramichi for Liverpool, but was never seen again [Peter-Michael Pawlik, Von der Weser in die Welt; Die Geschichte der Segelschiffe von Weser und Lesum und ihrer Bauwerften 1770 bis 1893, Schriften des Deutschen Schiffahrtsmuseums, Bd. 33 (Hamburg: Kabel, c1993), p. 225, no. 224]. Despite her long life, no picture of the EUROPA appears to survive. - [E-mail from Michael Palmer - 21 August 1998]


EUROPA (3)
The "Europa" of 1888 was built in 1884 by Wigham Richardson & Co of Walker-on-Tyne, England for Lavarello Line of Italy. She was a 2226 gross ton ship, length 95,46m x beam 10,79m, one funnel, four masts, iron construction, single screww and a speed of 12 knots. Accommodation for 75-1st class, 52-2nd class and 750-3rd class passengers. Launched on 27/2/1872, she ran between Genoa and South America until 1883 when she was sold to M.Bruzzo & Co. who used her on the same service until 1884, when she was sold to La Veloce. She commenced running for this company between Genoa and S.America on 18/6/1884 until 1893 when she was scrapped. [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Ted Finch - 11 September 1997]


EUROPA (3)
See HERMANN (1).


EUROPA (4)
See RIMUTAKA (3)


EUROPA (5) See BRAGA .


EUROPEAN
See WILLIAM PENN.


EURYDICE
From Charles Hocking, Dictionary of Diasasters at Sea During the Age of Steam, Including sailing ships and ships of war lost in action, 1824-1962 (London: Lloyds Register of Shipping, 1969), vol. 1, p. 232: EURYDICE Royal Navy, training frigate, sail; [built] 1843; [at] Portsmouth Dockyard; 921 tons; 141 x 38 x 8.7 [feet, length x breadth x depth of hold]; 26 guns. In 1877 the frigate EURYDICE, Capt. M. A. S. Hare, was converted into a training ship for ordinary seamen and sailed from Portsmouth on November 13th, 1877, with a complement of about 300 officers and ordinary seamen. Her destination was the West Indies and she was accompanied by the training brig MARTIN, being joined later at Madeira by H.M.S. LIBERTY from Plymouth, also manned by ordinary seamen. On March 6th, 1878, the EURYDICE left Bermuda on her homeward voyage, the other ships of the squadron having preceded her. In addition to her crew the vessel now carried a number of military officers and invalids from the West Indies. So far as can be ascertained the number on board totalled 368 persons. From the time of her leaving Bermuda to her being sighted by the coastguard at Bonchurch, I.O.W., no news of the EURYDICE reached England. At about 3.30 on the afternoon of Sunday, March 24th the vessel was seen bearing for Spithead under all plain sail. A heavy bank of cloud was coming down from N.W. and the glass was falling rapidly. There was an ominous stillness and such wind as there was came from westward, blowing on the port quarter of the ship. At ten minutes to four the wind suddenly veered to the eastward and a gale, accompanied by a blinding fall of snow came from the highlands down Luccombe Chine, striking the EURYDICE just a little before the beam and driving her out of her course, which was heading to the N.E. The ship was then discerned about two and three-quarter miles E.N.E. of Dunnose Head, near Ventnor.The schooner EMMA was sailing a little behind the EURYDICE and when the squall had passed she was seen to be on course in a normal manner, an evidence of the freakish nature of the wind.This ship picked up only five survivors, three of whom afterwards died. The remaining two were members of the crew, Benjamin Cuddiford of Plymouth, an able seaman, and Sydney Fletcher of Bristol, an ordinary seaman. The evidence of these men was that sail was taken in at 3.45 p.m. when the weather showed signs of changing. The captain was on deck and ordered the lower studding-sails to be taken in; to let go the topsail halliards and the mainsheet. At this time the water was over the lee netting on the starboard side. Meanwhile extra men had been ordered to the wheel, there being six all told assisted by Sub-Lt. the Hon. Edward Gifford. The men aloft taking in the royals were ordered below. The ship righted for a moment and then turned gradually over from forward and went down. Most of the men and boys were in the forepart and were sucked under when the vessel sank. On the following day it was established that the ship had foundered in 11 fathoms and that her topmasts with all sail set, were plainly visible. Salvage operations were immediately instituted and the vessel was raised and brought into Portsmouth on September 1st, 1878. She was never in commission again and was shortly afterwards broken up.For any accounts of the sinking of the EURYDICE published in the Times, check Palmer's Index for the first 2 quarters of 1878, under "Shipping News" and "Wrecks". Papers respecting the raising of H.M.S. EURYDICE are among the House of Lords Sessional Papers, 1878 (105) xi.273. - [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 28 February 1998]


EVERHARD
The EVERHARD was a 3-masted, square-rigged sailing ship (later re-rigged as a bark), built by the firm of Johann Lange, Vegesack/Grohn, for the Bremen firm of F. & E. Delius, and launched on 21 September 1831. 150 Commerzlasten; 29 x 8,6 x 5,3 meters (length x breadth x depth of hold). October 1831, maiden voyage, under Captain Johann Hinrich Barlach, Bremerhaven-Norfolk-Richmond, Virginia. Barlach's successors as captain were, in turn, by Hermann Chr. Stille, of Bremen, Th. Knigge, and Albert Haake, of Lemwerder. 1835, enlarged to 183 Commerzlasten by the shipbuilder Ide Oltmann, in Brake. On 13 April 1847, on her arrival in Antwerp from New Orleans, the EVERHARD was sold by F. & E. Delius to Catteux Wattel & Cie, of Antwerp, who renamed her CHARLES QUINT. Captains under the Belgian flag were L. Mussche and C. Sheridan. Her ultimate fate is unknown [Peter-Michael Pawlik, Von der Weser in die Welt; Die Geschichte der Segelschiffe von Weser und Lesum und ihrer Bauwerften 1770 bis 1893, Schriften des Deutschen Schiffahrtsmuseums, Bd. 33 (Hamburg: Kabel, c1993). pp. 177-178, no. 113]. [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing list by Michael Palmer - 14 January 1998]


F

FAIRLAND
See CARINTHIA.


FAIR PRINCESS
See CARINTHIA.


FAIRSEA (1)
The motorship FAIRSEA was built by Sun Shipbuilding & Dry Dock Co, Chester, Pennsylvania (ship #188), and launched on 1 March 1941, as the C3 freight and passenger ship RIO DE LA PLATA, for the Moore-McCormack Line. 11,678 tons; 150 x 21,1 meters (length x breadth); 1 funnel, 1 mast, cruiser stern; 2-stroke single-acting engines; service speed 16 (maximum 17) knots. 4 October 1941-3 March 1942, fitted out as the escort carrier CHARGER for the U.S. Navy; vessel transferred to the Royal Navy. 15 August 1946, removed from active duty. 1949, purchased by the Alvion Steam Ship Corp (Panama), renamed FAIRSEA, and refitted as a passenger vessel; accommodation for 1,800 passengers in a single class. 1950, first voyage, Bremerhaven-Sydney. 30 April - 18 September 1953, 6 roundtrip voyages, Bremerhaven-Quebec. 6 December 1955, first voyage (for the Sitmar Line), Southampton-Sydney. 20 June 1957, first voyage, Greenock-Quebec. 4 August 1957, first voyage, Bremen-Greenock-Quebec- Montreal-New York (3 roundtrip voyages). August 1957, last voyage, Bremen-Havre-Southampton- New York. 1957/58, rebuilt and modernized in Triest: 13,432 tons; 1,460 tourist class passengers; registered for the Sitmar Line (Societa Italiana Trasporti Marittimi), Genoa. 1958, returned to the Southampton-Sydney service. 1968, registered in Panama for Passenger Liner Services Inc; 13,317 tons. 29 January 1969, bound from Sydney to Southampton, engine room fire 900 miles west of the Panama Canal; towed to Balboa by the U.S. freighter LOUISE LYKES; laid up. 6 August 1969, arrived at La Spezia in tow by the tug VORTICE; scrapped [Arnold Kludas, Die grossen Passagierschiffe der Welt; Eine Dokumentation , Band 4: 1936-1950 (Oldenburg/Hamburg: Gerhard Stalling, c1974), p. 222; Noel Reginald Pixell Bonsor, North Atlantic Seaway; An Illustrated History of the Passenger Services Linking the Old World with the New (2nd ed.; Jersey, Channel Islands: Brookside Publications). - [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 4 February 1998]


FAIRSEA (2)
See CARINTHIA.


FAIR SKY
See FAIRSKY.


FAIRSKY
The "Fairsky" was built by the Western Pipe & Steel Co, San Francisco in 1941 as the cargo vessel "Steel Artisan". She was taken over by the US Navy and continued under construction as the auxiliary aircraft carrier USS "Barnes". On 30th September 1942 she was handed over to the Royal Navy and renamed HMS "Attacker". Returned to the US Navy in 1946, she was laid up until 1952 when she was sold to Sitmar Line, Rome and reconstructed as a 7,800 gross ton cargo vessel, renamed "Castel Forte" and registered in Panama. In 1957 she was rebuilt as a passenger ship at New York and later Genoa. Renamed "Fairsky" in 1958 and registered in Liberia, she made her first Southampton - Sydney voyage on June 28th 1958. In 1959 she was renamed "Fair Sky" (two words) and in 1966 commenced Southampton - Eastbound round-the-world voyages. She was laid up at Genoa in 1972 and has probably been scrapped since, but I have no definite knowledge of her after this date. [Pacific Liners 1927-72 by Frederick Emmons] [Great Passenger Ships of the World by Arnold Kludas, vol.5] - Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 1 March 1998]


FAIRWIND
See SYLVANIA .


FAITHFUL STEWARD
FAITHFUL STEWARD ~ HMS Ship ~ 3 masts ~ GTon 350 ~ Length 150 ft. Built UK? 178? Registered UK Stranded, wrecked in storm 1785-09-02 ~ Rehobeta Beach, Monhoba Bank, Indian River inlets, Cape Henlopen, DE. From: Londonderry To: Philadelphia with gold? and passengers. Captain: Conl. McCausland ~ Lost: 181/249+?? Notes: poss. 1 September ~ Merchantman ~ poss. Capt. Wlm. McCasland ~ Lost: 200/270-360 ~ departed May 20th or July 9th via Newcastle UK. References: newspaper The Daily Universal Register of London UK ~ 1785-11-24; Maryland Gazette; Encyclopedia of American Shipwrecks by Bruce D. Berman 1972 (number of errors); Notebook on Shipwrecks, Maryland and Delaware Coast by H. Richard Moale 1990; Shipwrecks in the Americas by Robert F. Marx 1971/75/87 - [Posted to The ShipsList by Sue Swiggum - 27 May 1998]


FALCON (1)
The FALCON was a wooden side-wheel steamship, built by William H. Brown, New York, in 1848 for a group of New York and Boston businessmen. 891 17/95 tons; 244 ft 2 in x 30 ft 2 in x 21 ft 5 in (length x breadth x depth of hold); 1 deck, 3 masts, round stern, sharp tuck, billethead; 2 inclined engines built in 1846 by Hogg and Delamater, New York, for John Ericsson's ill-fated Hudson River steamboat IRON WITCH, and transferred to the FALCON; diameter of cylinders 5 ft, length of stroke 5 ft; diameter of paddle wheels 32 ft; 360 h.p. 10 September 1848, maiden voyage, New York-Savannah-Havana-New Orleans. Purchased by the United States Mail Steamship Co, and sailed from New York for Chagres on 1 December 1848. Remained in the New York-New Orleans- Chagres service until 1852. 1857, converted into a towboat. By 1859, her engines had been removed, and she was serving as a quarantine hulk at Hoffman's Island, New York, where in April 1866 she was used to remove the passengers who had arrived sick with Asiatic cholera on the National Line steamship VIRGINIA [John Haskell Kemble, The Panama Route, 1848-1869, University of California Publications in History, 29 (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1943), p. 225]. - [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 6 July 1998}


FALCON (2)
I know nothing about the FALCON except that she was built by John Patten, Bath, Maine, in 1849. 813 tons; 157 ft 6 in x 33 ft 6 1/2 in x 16 ft 9 1/4 in (length x beam x depth of hold) [William Armstrong Fairburn, Merchant Sail (Center Lovell, Maine: Fairburn Marine Educational Foundation, [1945-1955]), vol. 5, p. 3196]. She should not be confused with the well-known tea clipper of the same name, which was built by Robert Steele & Co, Greenock, Scotland, in 1859, or with the steamship of the same name, 891 tons, built in New York City in 1848. - [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 10 February 1998]


FALKE
The "Falke" and her sister ship "Albatross" were built in 1893-94 by Stettin shipbuilders for North German Lloyd, which at that time ran a service from Bremen and Hamburg to London, Hull and Leith. In order to finance the building of their new express liners to New York, they sold the UK trade and it's ships in 1897 to the newly formed Argo Steamship Co of Bremen. The "Falke" was a 1,083 gross ton ship, length 213ft x beam 30ft, one funnel, two masts, acccommodation for 20-1st and 35-2nd class passengers, but have no details of her later history. As far as I can tell, the Argo Line continued operations until 1966, when it withdrew and sold it's last passenger ships. [A Century of North Sea Passenger Steamers by A.Greenway] - [E-mail from Ted Finch - 20 June 1998]


FARANSU MARU
See ILE DE FRANCE.


FEGGEN
See PHILIP DODRIDGE .


FELIX ROUSSEL
See AROSA SUN.


FELTRIA
See URANIUM.


FERDINAND DE LESSEPS
See STAD HAARLEM.


FERDINANDO PALASCIANO
See KONIG ALBERT.


FINLAND
The "Finland" was a 12,760 ton vessel built in 1902 by W.Cramp & sons of Philadelphia for the Red Star Line. Her dimensions were 560ft x 60.2ft and she had a straight stem, two funnels and four masts, twin screw and a speed of 15 knots. There was accommodation for 342 1st, 194 2nd and 626 3rd class passengers. She sailed under the American flag between New York and Antwerp until 1909 when she was transferred to the Belgian flag. In March 1909 she was used on the Naples - NY service by the White Star Line until June of that year. In 1912 she reverted to the US flag and was employed between Antwerp and NY until 1914 when she went on the NY - Naples - Piraeus run. In 1915 she was used by Panama Pacific Line between NY - Panama - San Francisco and later the same year for the American Line between NY - Falmouth - London. In 1916 employed by the same company on their NY - Liverpool run. When America entered the war in 1917 she was taken over as a US troopship until torpedoed 150 miles from the French coast. She reached St Nazaire where she was repaired. In 1919 she was altered to accommodate 242 1st, 310 2nd and 876 3rd class passengers and was employed between NY - Southampton and Antwerp for Red Star Line. In 1923 she was used again by American Line for their NY - Plymouth - Cherbourg - Hamburg. In 1923 transferred again to Panama Pacific Line for the NY - San Francisco service. Finally scrapped in 1928 at Blyth. The history of the Red Star Line is extremely complicated as they ran ships under three different flags (American, British and Belgian) and they transferred vessels continually between flags, different services and chartered to other companies. [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Ted Finch - 11 July 1997]

The steamship FINLAND was built for the Red Star Line by W. Cramp & Sons, Philadelphia (ship #312), and launched on 21 June 1902. 12,760 tons; 182,9 x 18,3 meters (length x breadth); 2 funnels, 4 masts; twin-screw propulsion (triple-expansion engines), service speed 15 knots; accommodation for 343 passengers in 1st class, 194 in 2nd class, and 1,000 in steerage. 4 October 1910, maiden voyage, New York-Antwerp (U.S. flag). By January 1909, first voyage, Antwerp-New York (Belgian flag). 6 March-5 June 1909, 3 roundtrip voyages for the White Star Line (charter), Naples-New York. 21 January 1912-8 August 1914, Antwerp-New York (U.S. flag). 22 August 1914, first of 2 roundtrip voyages, New York-Liverpool. 21 November 1914, first voyage, New York-Naples-Piraeus. 24 March 1915, last voyage, Genoa- Naples-New York (3 roundtrip voyages). 30 April-October 1915, for the Panama Pacific Line (charter), New York-Panama Canal-San Francisco. 26 October 1915, first of 2 roundtrip voyages for the American Line (charter), New York-Falmouth-London. 19 January 1916-18 February 1917, 11 roundtrip voyages for the American Line (charter), New York-Liverpool. 1917, U.S. troopship. 28 October 1917, torpedoed 150 miles off the French coast; reached St. Nazaire; repaired. 1919, returned to the Red Star Line; passenger accommodation altered to 242 in 1st class, 310 in 2nd class, 876 in 3rd class. 28 April 1920-22 March 1923, resumed Antwerp-Southampton- New York service. April 1923, sold to the American Line. 1 June 1923-23 September 1923, 4 roundtrip voyages, New York-Plymouth-Cherbourg-Hamburg (cabin and 3rd class only). November 1923, sold to the Panama Pacific Line. 1 November 1923, first voyage, New York-San Francisco. February 1928, sold to Hughes, Bolckow; scrapped at Blyth [Arnold Kludas, Die grossen Passagierschiffe der Welt; Eine Dokumentation, Bd. 1: 1858-1912 (2nd ed.; Oldenburg/Hamburg: Gerhard Stalling, c1972), pp. 84-85 (photograph). Noel Reginald Pixell Bonsor, North Atlantic Seaway; An Illustrated History of the Passenger Services Linking the Old World with the New (2nd ed.; Jersey, Channel Islands: Brookside Publications), vol. 2 (1978), p. 856]. - [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 4 August 1998]


FITZJAMES
The FITZJAMES was a 3-masted square-rigged ship, built in Richibucto, New Brunswick, in 1852, by John James Jardine, for his own account. 1206/1307 tons (old/new measurement), readmeasured in 1861 to 1195 tons; 186 x 32.5 x 22.7 feet (length x beam x depth of hold). Build of hackmatack, birth, spruce, and pine; felted and sheathed with yellow metal; iron bolts. Sold in 1853 to Pilkington & Wilson (from 1857: H. T. Wilson & Chambers), owners of the "Liverpool 'White Star' Line of Australian Packets", predecessor, in name only, to the White Star steamship line, owners of the TITANIC. Put in the North Atlantic trade after a projected voyage to Australia was cancelled; sailed from Liverpool on 8 November 1853 for New Orleans. 15 June 1854, first voyage, Liverpool-Melbourne. 24 January 1866, sailed from Liverpool for Melbourne; 14 February 1866, put into Lisbon after springing a leak; condemned as unseaworthy [Roy Anderson, White Star (Prescot, Lancashire: T. Stephenson & Sons, 1964), p. 186]. The following additional information is taken from Lloyd's Register of Shipping for 1853-1866: Master: 1853-1856 - I. Hoyt; 1857-1861 - Hamelton; 1861-1864 - W. Forsyth; 1864-1866 - Wardrop. Port of Registration: Liverpool. Port of Survey: 1853-1856 - Liverpool; 1857 - London; 1858-1859 - [not given]; 1860-1864 - Liverpool; 1864-1865 - London; 1865-1866 - Liverpool. Destined Voyage: 1853 - New York; 1854-1856 - Australia; 1857-1859 - [not given]; 1860-1861 - Australia; 1861-1863 - Callao; 1863-1864 - Quebec; 1864-1865 - South America; 1865-1866 - Australia. For additional information on the FITZJAMES, see also Dave Hollett, Fast passage to Australia: the history of the Black Ball, Eagle and White Star Lines (London: Fairplay, 1986). To determine whether any account survives of the voyage of the FITZJAMES on which your ancestor sailed, check Ian Hawkins Nicholson, Log of logs: a catalogue of logs, journals, shipboard diaries, letters and all forms of voyage narratives 1788 to 1988, Roebuck Society Publications, 41, 47 (2 vols.; Yaroomba, Queensland: Ian Nicholson, [1990]-1993). Finally, if you have not already done so, you should check the website of the
Australian National Maritime Museum in Sydney. The ANMM's library publishes, and also maintains online, a series of very informative research guides, known as Pathfinders,which cover various aspects of Australian maritime history research, including No. 2: Sailing Ships ), which is of particular importance to your research. [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 6 November 1997]


FIVALLER
See CITY OF BALTIMORE.


FLAMINGO
The steamship FLAMINGO was built as the LEOPARD, by Brownlow, Pearson & Co., Hull, in 1858, on their own account, for the Baltic trade. 550/849/690 tons (net/gross/under deck); 223.1 x 28.9 x 16.5 feet (length x beam x depth of hold); iron construction, screw propulsion, 5 bulkheads. Official number: 20634; international code signal letters: N.B.W.M. Acquired by Thomas Wilson Sons & Co, for their feeder service from Hamburg to Hull, in 1877. (Despite what the Hamburg indirect passenger list appears to say, the FLAMINGO did not sail from Hamburg to Liverpool but from Hamburg to Hull, where the passengers boarded a train for Liverpool, where they transferred to another vessel for the journey to North America.) Re-engined by Earle & Co., Hull, and renamed FLAMINGO in 1879 [Lloyd's Register for 1858-1881]. The latest edition of Lloyd's Register to which I have access is dated 1881, and I have no record of this vessel's history since that date. [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer]


FLAVIA
See CAMPANELLO.


FLORENCE NIGHTINGALE
The 1943-44 Lloyd's Register of Shipping gives the following details : FLORENCE NIGHTINGALE ex. Mormacsun-1942. Call sign : WHLG. Official # : 240541. Rigging : 2 decks and shelter deck; decks electrically welded; longitudinal framing at bottom and at decks; cruiser stern; fitted for fuel oil; equipped with Direction Finder, Gyro-compass and Echo Sounding Device; water ballast. Tonnage : 7,773 tons gross and 4,585 tons net. Dimensions : 469 feet long, 69.6 foot beam and holds 29.2 feet deep. Forecastle 39 feet long. Built : in 1940 by Moore Dry Dock Co. in Oakland, CA. Propulsion : 2 steam turbine double reduction geared to a single screw shaft. Engine built by DeLaval Steam Turbines Co. in Trenton, NJ . Owners : Moore-McCormack Lines Inc. Port of registry : San Francisco Flag : U.S.A. - [Posted to The ShipsList by Gilbert Provost - 1 October 1998]


FLORIDA
Built by Societa Esercizio Bacini, Rive Trigoso, Italy for Lloyd Italiano of Genoa, this was a 5,018 gross ton ship, length 381.4ft x beam 48.1ft, two funnels, two masts, twin screw and a speed of 14 knots. There was passenger accommodation for 25-1st and 1,600-3rd class. Launched on 22nd June 1905, she started her maiden voyage on 18th Sept.1905 when she left Genoa for Naples and Buenos Aires. After this voyage she commenced Genoa - Palermo - Naples - New York sailings on 15th Nov.1905. On 23rd Jan.1909 she collided with and sank the White Star liner "Republic" in dense fog off the US coast. Although receiving a badly damaged bow, she managed to reach New York and was repaired. This was the first occasion when wireless telegraphy was used to summon assistance at sea. Her last Genoa - Palermo - Naples - New York voyage started 20th Apr.1911, and her first class accommodation was downgraded to 2nd class. Sold to Ligure Brasiliana of Genoa the same year, she was renamed "Cavour" and was used for Genoa - South America sailings. In 1914 she went to Transatlantica Italiana and was sunk in collision with the Italian Auxiliary Cruiser "Caprera" on 12th Dec.1917 near Armevilla. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.3,p.1344] - [Posted to The Ships List by Ted Finch - 12 October 1998]


F. MISSLER
The F. Missler is one of the more famous "ghost" ships in emigration/immigration lore. No ship by that name existed. The confusion stems from the fact that F. Missler was a 19th century travel agent operating out of Bremen who established a good working relationship with the North German Lloyd shipping line. Probably your best bet is to obtain a list of vessels arriving at Quebec on the date in question, determine which of those took on passengers in Bremen and search the respective lists to find your relation. - [Posted to the ShipsList by Allyn Brosz - 30 March 1998]


FOLIA
See PRINCIPE DI PIEMONTE.


FORFAR
See MONTROSE (2).


FORTUNA
The Hamburg schooner FORTUNA was built in Finkenwerder by Wriede in 1839 (Bielbrief 29 November 1839). 48 Commerzlasten, 64 x 23.6 x 11 Hamburg Fusse (1 Hamburg Fuss = .28657 meter) length x beam x depth of hold. Owner: 1839-1847 - Johann Christian Pflugk; 1847 -24 Oct 1850 - Johann Christian Pflugks Erben; 24 Oct 1850-12 Jun 1852 - Friedrich Pieper; 12 Jun 1852-31 Jan 1854 - David Pieper; 31 Jan 1854-1862 - Hans Pieper (David Pieper's father). Master: 1839-1849 - J. J. Kruger; 1840-1850 - J. Vil; 1851-1852 - J. Witt; 1852-1855 - F. Pieper; 1855-1856 - D. Pieper; 1857-1860 - J. F. Kock; 1860-1862 - F. Pieper. Voyages: 1839/1840 - Plymouth/Sunderland; 1840 - Le Havre; 1840 - Hull/Middlesborough; 1840 - New Ray/Malaga; 1840/1841 - Bilbao/Cap Haitien; 1841 - Dublin/Alicante; 1842 - Leith/St Davids, Scotland; 1842 - Hull; 1842/1843 - San Jose, Guatemala/Liverpool; 1843 - Newcastle upon Tyne/St Uebes (Setubal); 1843/1844 - Sierra Leone; 1844/1845 - San Jose, Guatemala/Alicante; 1845/1847 - La Plata/intermediate ports/Stockton; 1847/1850 - La Plata/Antwerp/intermediate ports/New York; (1849)/Aux Cayes, Haiti; 1851 - Para; 1851/1852 - St Thomas/Santo Domingo; 1852/1856 - Rio Grande do Sul/Antwerp/intermediate ports/Penryn, England; 1857/1861 - Buenos Aires/intermediate ports/Cardiff; 1861/1862 - St Uebes (Setubal)/intermediate ports/Falmouth/ intermediate ports ... The FORTUNA was wrecked on (Grand) Turk Island, in the Bahamas, in 1862. [Walter Kresse, ed., Seeschiffs-Verzeichnis der Hamburger Reedereien, 1824-1888, Mitteilungen aus dem Museum fur Hamburgische Geschichte, N. F., Bd. 5. (Hamburg: Museum fur Hamburgische Geschichte, 1969), vol 2, pp. 109-110, 113]. - [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 23 October 1998]


FRANCE (1)
The French ship "France" was a 3,200 gross ton ship, built by Chantier de Penhoet, St Nazaire in 1864 for Compagnie Generale Tranatlantique (French Line). Her details were - length 346.6ft x beam 44ft, straight stem, two funnels, two masts(rigged for sail), iron construction, side paddle wheel propulsion and a speed of 12 knots. Launched on 1/10/1864, she made her maiden voyage in 1865 from St Nazaire to Vera Cruz. On 2/8/1872 she started a single round voyage between Havre, Brest and New York (last North Atlantic voyage by a French Line paddle steamer). On 29/9/1872 she left Brest for New York but her engines broke down off Cherbourg and she had to turn back to Havre. In 1874 she was lengthened to 395.2ft, 4,648 tons by A.Leslie & Co, Hebburn-on-Tyne, converted to single screw propulsion with compound engines by Maudslay, Sons & Field, London, and had a third mast fitted. She was also fitted with accommodation for 279-1st & 2nd class and 510-3rd class passengers. She resumed Havre - New York sailings on 7/11/1874 and on 22/3/1884 commenced her last voyage on this service. She then started St Nazaire - Panama voyages on 6/12/1884 and on 20/12/1886 was damaged by fire at sea. She arrived at Fort de France, Martinique on 24th December and then proceeded to St Nazaire, where she was reconditioned between February and June 1887. In 1895 she was fitted with triple expansion engines and was finally scrapped at Cherbourg in July 1910. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.2, p.653] - [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 6 April 1998]


FRANCE (2)
The British vessel "France" was built by T.Royden & Sons, Liverpool in 1867 for the National Line. She was a 3,572 gross ton ship, length 385.6ft x beam 42.4ft, clipper stem, one funnel, three masts (rigged for sail), iron construction, single screw and a speed of 10 knots. There was accommodation for 80-1st and 1,000-3rd class passengers. Launched on 4/6/1867, she sailed from Liverpool on her maiden voyage to Queenstown (Cobh) and New York on 13/10/1867. On 4/2/1874 she commenced her first voyage from London to New York and between 1874-1896 continued this service except for 5 voyages from Liverpool. She was rebuilt to 3,723 tons in 1874 and was fitted with compound engines by J.Jones & Sons, Liverpool in 1880. On 17/1/1896 she started her last London - New York voyage and was sold the same year. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.2, p.613] - [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 6 April 1998]


FRANCE (3)
The "France" was built by Chantiers de l'Atlantique, St Nazaire between 1957-1962 for the French Line (Compagnie Generale Transatlantique). Her details were 66,348 gross tons, overall length 1035.2ft x beam 110.9ft, two funnels, one mast, four screws and a speed of 34 knots. There was accommodation for 500-1st and 1,550-tourist class passengers. Launched on 11/5/1960, she left Havre on her maiden voyage for Southampton and New York on 3/2/1962. Later that year, her four bladed propellers were replaced by five bladed. On 4/5/1967 she made her first sailing from Havre to Southampton and Quebec for the International Exhibition (one round voyage). On 13/7/1967, she started her first voyage from Havre - Southampton - Quebec - New York and on 4/10/1968 made her last sailing on this route (3 round voyages). On 14/10/1971 she started her first voyage Bremen - Havre - Southampton - New York and on 5/9/1974 commenced her last New York - Southampton - Havre voyage. On 12/9/1974 she anchored off Havre owing to the crew's refusal to enter port as a protest against the impending lay up of the ship. On 10/10/1974 she finally entered port and was laid up on 7/12/1974.She left Havre for Bremerhaven on 18/8/1979 for conversion to a one class cruise ship for the Norwegian Caribbean Line. She was completely renovated, her tonnage increased to 69,379 tons, her two outer propellers removed to give her a speed of 21 knots, her hull painted white and her name changed to "Norway". She was then the largest passenger ship in commission. [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 8 November 1997]


FRANCESCA
The "Francesca" was built by Russell & Co, Port Glasgow in 1905 for the Austrian company, Unione Austriaca. She was a 4946 gross ton vessel, length 359.8ft x beam 48ft, one funnel, two masts, single screw and a speed of 12 knots. There was accommodation for 30-1st, 50-2nd, and 1,500-3rd class passengers. Launched on 2/6/1905, she left Trieste on 27/8/1905 on her maiden voyage to Naples, Palermo and New York. She did 17 round voyages on this service, commencing her last run on 13/3/1908 and was then transferred to the South America service. In 1919 she went to the Italian Cosulich Line for whom she did one round voyage from Genoa - Naples - New York commencing 22/5/1919. I have no details after this until she was scrapped in 1926. She was probably laid up during this period.[Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Ted Finch - 9 September 1997]


FRANCESCO CRISPI
See COLUMBIA (4).


FRANKFURT
The "Frankfurt" was built in 1869 for North German Lloyd of Bremen by Caird & Co, Greenock. She was a 2,582 gross ton ship, length 300ft x beam 39ft, clipper stem, one funnel, two masts (rigged for sail), iron construction, single screw and a speed of 10 knots. There was capacity for 30-1st and 600-3rd class passengers. Launched on 18th Jun.1869 for the Bremen - New Orleans service, but she started her first voyage from Bremen to Havre and New York on 30th Jun.1870. She was laid up during the Franco-Prussian War and then between 1871-1874 was mainly employed on the New Orleans service, but also made six round voyages to New York during this period. In 1880 her engines were compounded and she commenced her last North Atlantic voyage between Bremen and Baltimore on 8th Mar.1882. Subsequently she sailed between Bremen and South America, starting her final voyage on 30th Sep.1893. In 1894 she was sold to Sir W. G. Armstrong, Mitchell & Co, shipbuilders, in part payment for two new ships. Sold to Italian owners in 1895, she was scrapped in Italy in 1897. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P. Bonsor, vol.2, p.547] - [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 25 September 1998]


FRANKLIN
The "Franklin" of 1871 was built by T.R.Oswald & Co, Sunderland for the German company, Baltischer Lloyd. She was an 1,878 gross ton ship, length 282ft x beam 36ft, clipper stem, one funnel, two masts, iron construction, single screw and a speed of 11 knots. I don't have any information on her passenger capacity. She was launched in June 1871 and commenced her maiden voyage from Stettin to Copenhagen and New York on 8/8/1871. On 6/8/1874 she sailed on her last voyage from Stettin to Copenhagen, Antwerp, New York(arr.15/7/1874) and Stettin. She made a total of 14 round voyages on this service. In 1874 she was sold to the Italian company, Rubattino of Genoa and renamed "Batavia". On 23/11/1877 she was wrecked on Capy Shoals near Marseilles.There was an earlier American vessel (1850) with the same name. [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 2 November 1997]


FRANZISCA
The Bremen bark FRANZISCA, built by by shipwright H[ermann] F[riedrich] Ulrichs, Vegesack/Fahr, and launched on 23 October 1845. 147 Commerzlasten/349 tons; 32,4 x 8,5 x 4,2 meters/106.3 x 28.5 x 13.8 feet (length x beam x depth of hold). The FRANZISCA was built for the bremen firms of Friedrich Leo Quentell (succeeded in 1857 by Wm. Eduard Quentell) and Friedrich Wm. Stallforth Wwe, each of whom held a 1/2 share, for the freight and passenger service to the United States (the voyage to Galveston was her maiden voyage). >From 1845 to 1861, her masters were A. Hagedorn, Tonjes Sturje (who in 1849 became harbormaster at Harburg, and founded there the "Erste Rhederei Gesellschaft zu Harburg"), and Mathias Raake. On 23 October 1861, the FRANZISCA was sold to Block, Lowe & Cons., Hamburg, who solder her in 1862 to Captain Dillwitz, of Rostock. On 23 October 1870, it was reported from Dunkirk that the North German bark FRANZISCA, Capt. Dillwitz., bound from Newcastle with a cargo of coal, had been seized a few days earlier by the French naval steamer DESAIX and brought into Dunkirk as a prize of war. Her later history and ultimate fate are not known [Peter-Michael Pawlik,Von der Weser in die Welt; Die Geschichte der Segelschiffe von Weser und Lesum und ihrer Bauwerften 1770 bis 1893, Schriften des Deutschen Schiffahrtsmuseums, Bd. 33 (Hamburg: Kabel, c1993), pp. 270-271, no. 15; Walter Kresse, ed., Seeschiffs-Verzeichnis der Hamburger Reedereien, 1824-1888, Mitteilungen aus dem Museum fur Hamburgische Geschichte, N. F., Bd. 5. (Hamburg: Museum fur Hamburgische Geschichte, 1969), vol. 1, p. 58]. - [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 25 August 1998]


FREDERICO
See PALMERSTON.


FREDRIK
See MINONA.


FREEDOM
See WITTEKIND.


FRIEDRICH DER GROSSE
The "Friedrich der Grosse" was built by AG Vulcan, Stettin in 1896 for North German Lloyd of Bremen. She was a 10,531 gross ton ship, length 159,40m x beam 18,29m (523ft x 60ft), two funnels, two masts, twin screw and a speed of 15 knots. There was passenger accommodation for 226-1st, 235-2nd and 1,671-3rd class. Launched on 1/8/1896, she sailed from Bremen on her maiden voyage to Australia via Suez on 11/11/1896. On 4/4/1897 she commenced her first voyage from Bremen to Falmouth (to pick up passengers from the "Konigin Louise" which had broken her steering gear) and New York. On 22/3/1907 she started her first Naples - New York crossing and made her last Genoa - Naples - New York sailing on 25/7/1912 (16 round voyages). On 22/11/1913 she started her last Bremen - New York voyage and on 21/1/1914 started her last Bremen - Australia voyage (14 round voyages to Australia). She transferred to the Bremen - Baltimore service on 4/6/1914 and made her last Bremen - Philadelphia - Baltimore sailing on 9/7/1914. In August 1914 she took refuge in New York and in April 1917 was seized by the US authorities and became the US Government ship "Huron". In 1922 she went to the Los Angeles SS Co and was renamed "City of Honolulu". While on her first Honolulu - Los Angeles crossing she was damaged by fire on 12/10/1922, and on 17/10/1922 was sunk by gunfire by the US transport "Thomas". (probably because she was a danger to navigation). [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P. Bonsor, vol.2, p.559] - [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 16 April 1998]

The steamship FRIEDRICH DER GROSSE was built for Norddeutscher Lloyd by AGVulcan, Stettin (ship #231), and launched on 1 August 1896. 10.531 tons (the first German vessel over 10,000 tons); 159,4 x 18,29 meters (length x breadth); 2 funnels, 2 masts; twin-screw propulsion, quadruple- expansion engines, service speed 14.5 knots; accommodation for 216 passengers in 1st class, 227 in 2nd class, and from 1,671 to 1,964 in steerage; crew of 175 to 222. 11 November 1896, maiden voyage, Bremen-Suez Canal-Australia. 4 April 1897, first voyage, Bremen-Falmouth (to take on passengers from the KONIGIN LUISE, whose rudder had broken)-New York. 1902, enclosed bridge added; 10,696 tons. 22 March 1903, first voyage, Naples-New York. 25 July 1912, last voyage, Genoa-Naples-New York (16 roundtrip voyages). 22 November 1913, last voyage, Bremen - New York. 21 January 1914, last voyage, Bremen-Australia (14 roundtrip voyages). 4 June 1914, first voyage, Bremen - Baltimore. 9 July 1914, last voyage, Bremen-Philadelphia- Baltimore. 3 August 1914, took refuge at the Norddeutscher Lloyd pier at Hoboken. 6 April 1917, seized by the U.S. Government; renamed HURON (transport). 1919, transferred to the U.S. Shipping Board; oil firing; chartered to the Munson Line, New York, for its New York-Buenos Aires service. 1 December 1921, leased to the Los Angeles Steamship Co; major rebuilding; renamed CITY OF HONOLULU. 23 September 1922, first voyage, Los Angeles-Honolulu. 12 October 1922, on return voyage, damaged by fire 575 miles from Los Angeles; all on board taken onto the U.S. Army Transport THOMAS, and the freighter WEST FARALLON. 17 October 1922, sunk by gunfire from the U.S. Coast Guard cutter SHAWNEE as a threat to navigation [Edwin Drechsel, Norddeutscher Lloyd Bremen, 1857-1970; History, Fleet, Ship Mails, vol. 1 (Vancouver: Cordillera Pub. Co., c1994), pp. 167-168, no. 96 (photographs); Arnold Kludas, Die grossen Passagierschiffe der Welt; eine Dokumentation, Bd. 1: 1858-1912 (2nd ed.; Oldenburg/Hamburg: Gerhard Stalling, c1972), pp. 18-19 (photographs); Noel Reginald Pixell Bonsor, North Atlantic Seaway; An Illustrated History of the Passenger Services Linking the Old World with the New (2nd ed.; Jersey, Channel Islands: Brookside Publications), vol. 2 (1978), p. 559]. Also pictured in Michael J. Anuta, Ships of Our Ancestors (Menominee, MI: Ships of Our Ancestors, 1983), p. 104, courtesy of the Peabody Essex Museum, East India Square, Salem, Massachusetts 01970, - {Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 17 April 1998]


FRIESLAND
The "Friesland" was a 7116 gross ton vessel built by J & G Thomson, Glasgow in 1889 for the Red Star Line. Her details were - length 437ft x beam 51.2ft, clipper stem, one funnel, four masts, steel construction, single screw and a speed of 15 knots. There was accommodation for 226-1st, 102-2nd and 600-3rd class passengers. She sailed under the Belgian flag. Launched on 15/8/1889, she sailed from Antwerp for New York on her maiden voyage on 7/12/1889. She commenced her last voyage on this service on 10/1/1903 and was then transferred to the American Line under the US flag. She was refitted to carry 300-2nd class and 600-3rd class passengers and put onto the Liverpool - Philadelphia service, commencing 25/3/1903. She made her last voyage on this run in May 1911 and was then sold to an Italian company who removed two of her masts and renamed her "La Plata". She was scrapped in 1912.] [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Ted Finch - 1 October 1997]


FRISIA
The "Frisia" was built by Caird & Co.Greenock in 1872 for the Hamburg America Line. Her details were - 3,256 gross tons, length 349.5ft x beam 40.2ft, one funnel, two masts, iron construction, single screw and a speed of 13 knots. Accommodation for 90-1st, 130-2nd and 600-3rd class passengers. She was originally laid down as the "Alsatia" but was launched on 30/3/1872 as the "Frisia". On 21/8/1872 she sailed from Hamburg on her maiden voyage to Havre and New York and commenced her last voyage on this service on 13/9/1885. She was then sold to a British company and in 1889 went to an Italian company who renamed her "Temarario". In 1890 she went to the Banco di Genova, Genoa who renamed her "Arno". In 1892 she became the "Arno" of Navigazione Generale Italiana, who used her for one round voyage from Genoa to Catania, Naples and New York and in 1898 she was converted to a coal carrier. In 1901 she became a coal hulk at Genoa and was scrapped in Italy in 1902. - [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 23 October 1997]

The "Frisia" was built by Caird & Co, Greenock in 1872 for Hamburg America Line. She was a 3,256 gross ton ship, length 349.5ft x beam 40.2ft, straight stem, one funnel, two masts (rigged for sail), iron construction, single screw and a speed of 13 knots. There was accommodation for 90-1st, 130-2nd and 600-3rd class passengers. Laid down as the "Alsatia" but was launched on 20th Mar.1872 as the "Frisia". She started her maiden voyage on 21st Aug.1872 when she left Hamburg for Havre and New York and stayed on this service until starting her last voyage on 13th Sep.1885. In 1888 she was sold to R.L.Gillcrest of London and resold to Italian owners in 1889 and renamed "Temerario". In 1890 she went to Banco di Genova, Genoa and was renamed "Arno" and in 1892 came under the ownership of Navigazione Generale Italiana. She commenced a single round voyage between Genoa - Catania - Naples and New York on 6th May 1892 and in 1898 was converted to a coal carrier. In 1901 she became a coal hulk at Genoa and was scrapped in Italy in 1902. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P. Bonsor, vol.1, p.390-1] [Merchant Fleets by Duncan Haws, vol.4, Hamburg America line] - [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 7 October 1998]


FULDA
The "Fulda" belonged to Norddeutscher Lloyd [North German Lloyd]. She was built by John Elder & Co, Glasgow, she was a 4816 gross ton ship, length 429.8ft x beam 45.9ft, two funnels, four masts, iron construction, single screw, speed 16 knots. Accommodation for 120-1st, 130-2nd and 1,000-3rd class passengers. Launched on 15/11/1882, commenced her maiden voyage on 14/3/1883 from Bremen to Southampton and New York. On 14/3/1886 she rescued all the passengers and crew of the Cunard vessel "Oregon" which was sunk in collision near Long Island. She started her last voyage on this run on 7/10/1891 and was transferred on 24/10/1891 to the New York - Genoa service. Last voyage commenced 27/10/1898 and was chartered to Cie. Trasatlantica for Spanish troop repatriation. On 2/2/1899 she entailed serious damage while in drydock at Birkenhead after provisional sale to the Canadian Steamship Co. The deal was abandoned and she was scrapped. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor] [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Ted Finch - 2 October 1997]


FURNESSIA
The only information I have on the SS Furnessia is that it was built for the Anchor Line in 1880. I know it made a trip from Glasgow, Scotland March 20, 1907, arriving in New York Harbor April 12, 1907. The Peabody Museum of Salem has a photo of the ship. [Submitted by Alfred M. Silberfeld, President, Jewish Genealogical Society of Palm Beach County Inc., Delray Beach, Florida - 12 October 1997]

The "Furnessia" of 1895 was built in 1880 by the Barrow Shipbuilding Co, Barrow for the Barrow Steamship Co. She was a 5,495 gross ton vessel, length 445.1ft x beam 44.8ft, two funnels, two masts, iron construction, single screw and a speed of 14 knots. There was accommodation for 242-1st, 136-2nd and 981-3rd class passengers. Launched on 19/10/1880, she left Glasgow on her maiden voyage to Moville(Ireland) and New York on 17/2/1881. She commenced her last voyage on this service on 5/4/1883 (21 round voyages) and on 9/5/1883 was transferred to the Liverp[ool - Queenstown(Cobh) - New York run. She made 6 round voyages on this service, the last one commencing 1/11/1883 and on 7/12/1883 resumed the Glasgow - Moville - New York service. In 1891 she was fitted with triple expansion engines and her funnels reduced to one. On 17/11/1893 she was transferred from Barrow Steamship Co. to Anchor Line and in 1909 her accommodation was modified to 1st and 3rd class only. On 12/8/1911 she sailed from Glasgow on her final voyage to Moville, New York and Glasgow and on 22/11/1911 was scrapped at Barrow. [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 31 October 1997]


FURST BISMARCK
The "Furst Bismarck" was buit by A.G.Vulcan, Stettin for the Hamburg America Line and was laid down as the "Venetia" but launched as the "Furst Bismarck". She was a 8,430 gross ton ship, length 502.6ft x beam 57.6ft, three funnels, two masts, twin screw and a speed of 19 knots. There was accommodation for 420-1st, 172-2nd and 700-3rd class passengers. Launched on 29/11/1890, she left Hamburg on her maiden voyage to Southampton and New York on 8/5/1891. On 27/3/1894 she commenced her first voyage from Genoa to Naples and New York and continued this service during the winter months until commencing her last Naples - New York voyage on 26/1/1902. She started her last Hamburg - Southampton - New York voyage on 5/11/1903. She was sold to Russia in 1904, converted to an auxiliary cruiser and renamed "Don". In 1906 she went to the Russian Volunteer Fleet, was renamed "Moskva" and from 13/5/1907 she ran between Libau, Rotterdam and New York. She made 4 round voyages, and in 1913 was sold to the Austrian Navy who renamed her "Gaea" and used her as a depot ship. Seized by Italy at the end of the Great War, she was rebuilt and renamed "San Giusto" for the Cosulich Line. In 1921 she made one round voyage from Trieste to Naples and New York and was scrapped in Italy in 1924.If you should order photos of this vessel, be sure to specify the date as there was a later "Furst Bismarck" belonging to Hamburg America Line, built in 1905.[Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 29 October 1997}


FUSO MARU
See LATVIA.


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