Q R S

Q

QUATRE AMIS
See SUEVIA.


QUEBEC
The "Quebec" of 1875 was built by Smith & Rodger, Glasgow. She was a 2,138 gross ton ship, length 318ft x beam 36.3ft, clipper stem, one funnel, three masts (rigged for sail), iron construction, single screw and a speed of 11 knots. Laid down for British owners as the "Hellespont", she was bought on the stocks by the Inman Line of Liverpool and launched in February 1864 as the "City of Dublin". She started her maiden voyage on 10/12/1864 when she left Liverpool for Queenstown (Cobh) and New York. Her last voyage on this service commenced 2/4/1872 and she was then purchased by the Dominion Line of Liverpool, and fitted with compound engines by Laird Bros, Birkenhead. She started a single round voyage between Liverpool and Boston on 19/2/1874 and was then renamed "Quebec". She commenced Liverpool - Quebec - Montreal voyages on 16/4/1874 and started Avonmouth - Quebec - Montreal sailings on 30/4/1886. Her last voyage between Avonmouth, Swansea and New York started on 16/12/1887 and in 1888 she was sold to French owners and renamed "Nautique". On 16/2/1890 she was abandoned and lost in the North Atlantic. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P. Bonsor, vol.1, p.241] - [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 19 May 1998]


QUEEN
The SS "The Queen" was a 3412 gross ton vessel built in 1865 by Laird Bros, Birkenhead for National Line of Liverpool. Her details were - length 381.1ft x beam 42.4ft, clipper stem, one funnel, three masts, iron construction, single screw and a speed of 10 knots. I have no information on the number or class of passengers carried. Launched on 29/4/1865, she sailed from Liverpool on her maiden voyage to Queenstown (Cobh) and New York on 23/8/1865. In 1867 she was used as an Abyssinian campaign transport ship and in 1872 was rebuilt to a tonnage of 4,441 tons. On 21/5/1872 she commenced her first voyage on the London - Havre - New York service and on 16/1/1873 started her last run on this service. Between 1873-4 she was fitted with compound engines and resumed the Liverpool - Queenstown - New York service on 22/4/1874. From 1880 to 1886 she was used on either the Liverpool or London to New York service and from 14/4/1886 was used solely between Liverpool and New York. On 25/7/1889 she made her last run with cabin class passengers and on 12/3/1892 made her last run with 3rd class passengers. She was then used between Liverpool or London and New York with cargo only until her final voyage starting 23/12/1894. She was sold in 1896 and scrapped. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.2, p.612][Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Ted Finch - 22 October 1997]


QUEEN FREDERICA
See VASILISSA FREIDERIKI .


QUEEN OF BERMUDA
The only vessel of this name of which I am aware is the electric turbine ship QUEEN OF BERMUDA, built in 1932 by Vickers-Armstrong, Barrow-in-Furness (ship #681), for Furness, Withy & Co's New York-Bermuda service. 22,575 tons; 580 x 76 feet (length x breadth); 3 funnels, 2 masts; steam turboelectric engines, quadruple screw, service speed 19 knots. 700 passengers in 1st class, 31 in 2nd class; crew of 410. 1 September 1932, launched. 21 February 1933, maiden voyage, Liverpool-New York; then placed in service between New York and Bermuda. 1939-1947, war service, with one of the original three funnels removed. 1949, following refitting (including restoration of the third funnel), resumed Bermuda service. 1961-1962, rebuilt by Harland & Wolff, Belfast; 22,522 tons, 1 funnel. 1966-1967, scrapped at Faslane, Scotland, by Shipbreaking Industries Ltd [Arnold Kludas, Die grossen Passagierschiffe der Welt; Eine Dokumentation, Bd. 3: 1924-1935 (Oldenburg/Hamburg: Gerhard Stalling, 1973), pp. 183-183 (photographs)]. - [Posted to The Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 4 June 1998]

The "Queen of Bermuda" was a Furness Line ship, but wasn't built until 1933. She sailed between New York and Bermuda and ran a shuttle service with her sister ship "Monarch of Bermuda". She was a 22,500 gross ton ship, built at Barrow and had a length of 550ft x beam 76ft, three funnels and a speed of 19.5 knots. She had capacity for 733 passengers. During the war she was used as an Armed Merchant Cruiser, and later as a troopship until 1947. Completely modernised at Belfast in 1961 and rebuilt with one funnel, she returned to the New York - Bermuda service in 1962. In 1966 the company retired from the Bermuda trade and the ship arrived at Faslane, on the Clyde on 6th December 1966 to be scrapped. [British Passenger Liners of the Five Oceans by Commander C.R.Vernon Gibbs R.N.][North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P. Bonsor, vol.3,p.1029-30] As far as I can tell there was no previous passenger ship with this name. - [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 5 June 1998]


QUETTA
The "Quetta" was a 'one off' and had no sister ships. She was a 3,302 gross ton ship, built in 1881 by Denny & Bros, Dumbarton for the British India Steam Nav. Co. Her details were - length 380ft x beam 40ft, straight stem, one funnel, three masts (barquentine rigged for sail), iron construction, single screw and a speed of 12 knots. There was accommodation for 76-1st and 32-2nd class passengers. She sailed from London on her maiden voyage to Madras and Calcutta on May 18th 1881 and on April 9th 1883 transferred to the London - Brisbane 'Queensland Royal Mail Service'. On 28th February 1890 she struck an uncharted rock (now named "Quetta Rock") in the Torres Strait, while on route from Brisbane to London. The ship sank in three minutes with the loss of 133 out of 293 passengers and crew, the survivors being saved by the search vessel "Albatross". The final survivor, Emily Lacy, aged 15 was picked up two days later on March 2nd, delirious but still mechanically swimming. [Merchant Fleets by Duncan Haws, vol.11, British India S.N.Co] - [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 20 April 1998]


QUINTILAMARE
See KUMERIC.


R

RACEHORSE:
See MATILDA WATTENBACH.


RACE HOUND
The RACE HOUND was a 3-masted, square-rigged ship, 499 tons, built at Thomaston, Maine, in 1851, and registered at New York on 16 February 1852, the same day that she cleared for California; her voyage to California thus almost certainly constituted her first "ocean" voyage [Forrest R. Holdcamper, comp., List of American-flag Merchant Vessels that received Certificates of Enrollment or Registry at the Port of New York, 1789-1867 (Record Groups 41 and 36), National Archives Publication 68-10, Special Lists 22 (Washington, DC: National Archives and Records Service, 1968,, p. 578]. [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 18 December 1997]


RANGATIRA
There appears to be some confusion on the spelling of the first ship. Some books spell it "Rangatira" and some "Rangitira". I have no doubt that these are the same ship, but to confuse matters further, there was also a two funnelled "Rangatira" that plied between Lyttleton and Wellington in the 1930s! Anyway, here is all I have on your ship.
Built by Workman Clark, Belfast in 1908 for Shaw Savill & Albion, she was one of five sister ships built for the frozen meat trade. Her details were - 10,118 gross tons, length 145.69m (478ft) x beam 18.68m(61.3ft) x depth 9.54m(31.3ft), one funnel, two masts, twin screw and a speed of 13 knots. There was passenger accommodation for 1,000 steerage class in the 'tween deck space. Launched on December 16th 1908, she entered service as a frozen meat carrier in February 1909. On February 7th 1910 she was put on the Liverpool - Wellington service and in September 1914 was converted to a troopship by the Naval Dockyard at Sydney. She was wrecked on Robbin Island, Table Bay on 31.3.1916 and much of her cargo was salvaged in the five months that it took for the ship to break up. [Merchant Fleets, vol.10, Shaw Savill & Albion by Duncan Haws] - [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 7 June 1998]


RANGITIRA
See RANGATIRA.


RAPIDO
See COLUMBIA (5) .


REBECCA
The REBECCA was a 3-masted, square-rigged ship built by the shipbuilder Johann Lange, of Vegesack/Grohn, for the Bremen firm of J. F. W. Iken & Co, and launched on 10 or 11 September 1840. 187 Commerzlasten/456 tons register; 31,8 x 8,6 x 5,4 meters (length x beam x depth of hold). She was employed primarily in the North American trade. In 1861, she was purchased by Gerhard Lange, Bremen, and Carl Lange, Bremerhaven. During her 25 years (1840-1865) under the Bremen flag, the REBECCA was commanded by nine masters: Daniel Hinrich Dewers, Hinrich Klockgeter, Daniel Beenken, Fr. Kukens, Bernhard Heinrich Cassebohm, Wilhelm Franke, Justin Hermann Klugkist, C. H. W. Schierenberg, and Hermann Heinrich Christoffers. In 1865, she was sold to Holm & Broch, in Drammen, Norway. In 1881, she was still sailing, under the command of Captain P. M. Dahm, for T. Broch, of Drammen [Peter-Michael Pawlik, Von der Weser in die Welt; Die Geschichte der Segelschiffe von Weser und Lesum und ihrer Bauwerften 1770 bis 1893, Schriften des Deutschen Schiffahrtsmuseums, Bd. 33 (Hamburg: Kabel, c1993), p. 201]. [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 8 November 1997]


REBECCA CLYDE
The REBECCA CLYDE, Official # 021769, SS-screw, 446 GTon, built in Chester PA in 1863. Registered in Philadelphia PA? On 1876-09-17 it was stranded-total loss, Portsmouth area, Cape Hatteras NC.There were 13 lost, of an unknown number of souls. Ref: Merchant Steam Vessels of the United States - 1790-1868 by William M Lytle & Forrest R Holdcamper. Pub: Steamship Historical Society of America 1952 & 1975 Note: Lists 1st Home Port v's Port of Registry. [Posted to The ShipsList by Sue Swiggum - 11 December 1997]


RED JACKET
The "Red Jacket" was built in 1853 by George Thomas of Rockland, Maine and was named after an Indian Chief. She had a beautiful figurehead of this warrior complete with feathered headdress. Her registered tonnage was 2460 tons, length 260ft x beam 44ft x depth 26ft. She sailed from New York on her maiden voyage on 10th January 1854 and reached Point Lynas Point, Anglesey on 23rd Jan. She left Liverpool for the White Star Line, under the command of Captain Samuel Reid, on 4th May 1854 and made the passage to Port Phillip Heads in 69 days. By the 1870's she was being used in the North Atlantic timber trade from Canada to Liverpool and she ended her days as a coal hulk at Cape Verde. In her day, she was one of the crack passenger ships on the UK - Australia trade and was in competition with the Black Ball Line's "Lightning" This information is from The Colonial Clippers by Basil Lubbock [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Ted Finch]


REFUGE
See KENMORE.


REGINA (1)
See ROSLIN CASTLE.


REGINA (2)
See TEUTONIA (1) .


REGINA (3)
The "Regina" of 1926 was built by Harland & Wolff, Glasgow in 1917 and was a 16,313 gross ton ship, length 574.4ft x beam 67.8ft, completed as a cargo steamer with one funnel and one mast, triple screw and a speed of 15 knots. Launched on 19/4/1917 for the Dominion Line, she went to Harland & Wolff, Belfast in August 1920 for completion as a passenger vessel. Here she was fitted with two funnels, two masts, an upper promenade deck, and accommodation for 600-cabin and 1,700-3rd class passengers. On 16/3/1922 she started her first voyage between Liverpool, Halifax and Portland and on 29/4/1922 her first between Liverpool, Quebec and Montreal. She commenced her last voyage on this service on 6/11/1925 and on 12/12/1925 started her first Liverpool - Halifax - New York voyage under charter to White Star Line. In June 1926 she was converted to Cabin, tourist and 3rd class accommodation and on 1/11/1929 commenced her last Liverpool - Belfast - Glasgow - Quebec - Montreal voyage for White Star. In 1929 she was sold to Red Star Line of Antwerp, renamed "Westernland" and commenced Antwerp - Southampton - Cherbourg - New York voyages on 10/1/1930 with tourist and 3rd class passengers. On 30/11/1934 she started her last Antwerp - Havre - Southampton - New York - Havre - London - Antwerp voyage and in 1935 went to Bernstein Red Star Line of Hamburg. Converted to carry 486-tourist class passengers, she commenced Antwerp - Southampton - New York sailings on 29/3/1935 and started her last voyage on this service on 6/5/1939. In 1939 she was sold to Holland America Line and in June of thay year resumed Antwerp - Southampton - New York sailings. She started her last passenger voyage on 10/4/1940 when she left Antwerp for New York and in November 1942 was bought by the British Admiralty and used as a repair ship. She was scrapped at Blyth in 1947. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.2,p.813] - [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 17 March 1998]


REGINA D'ITALIA
The "Regina d'Italia" was a 6,560 gross ton ship, built by Sir J.Laing &Sons Ltd, Sunderland (engines by G.Clark Ltd, Sunderland) in 1907. Her details were - length 430ft x beam 52.7ft, two funnels, two masts, twin screw and a speed of 14 knots. There was accommodation for 120-1st and 1,900-3rd class passengers. Originally laid down as the "Sardinian Prince" for the British owned Prince Line, she was purchased on the stocks by Lloyd Sabaudo and launched on 20th Jan.1907 as the "Regina d'Italia. She sailed on her maiden voyage from Genoa to Naples, Palermo and New York on 15th May 1907, made two Genoa - South America voyages the same year and in Dec.1908 she was used as a hospital ship after the Messina earthquake. She continued New York sailings during the Great War up until the end of 1916 when regular passenger voyages on this route were discontinued by the company. On 10th Apr.1919, she resumed N. Atlantic sailings when she left Genoa for Marseilles and New York and in 1920 was refitted to carry 2nd and 3rd class passengers only. On 20th Jan.1920 she arrived at New York from Constanza, Constantinople, Smyrna, Piraeus and Messina and started her last Genoa-Naples-Boston-New York voyage on 14th Mar.1922. In Apr.1922 she transferred to the Genoa - South America service, except for a single round voyage between Genoa, Naples, Palermo, Halifax and New York commencing 22nd May 1924. In Oct.1928 she was scrapped in Italy.[North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P. Bonsor, vol.3, p.1361-1367] [South Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P. Bonsor, p.385] - [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 22 September 1998]


REGINA ELENA
The "Regina Elena" was built in 1889 by Wigham Richardson & Co, Walker-on-Tyne as the "Sikh" for the British owned Mogul Line. She was a 2,811 gross ton ship, length 335ft x beam 40.2ft, one funnel, two masts, single screw and a speed of 12 knots. There was accommodation for 25-2nd and 1,100-3rd class passengers. Launched on 16/1/1889, she was purchased by Puglia Societa di Navigazione of Bari, Italy in 1901 and renamed "Regina Elena". On 22/4/1902 she sailed from Genoa on her first voyage to Messina, Palermo, Naples and New York, and made a total of six round voyages on this service, two each year interspersed with South American voyages. Her last North Atlantic crossing commenced 22/4/1904 when she left Naples for New York. In 1904 she was sold to Unione Austriaca, renamed "Georgia" and her 2nd class accommodation was upgraded to 1st class. On 28/11/1904 she commenced her first voyage from Trieste to the Azores and New York and on 27/6/1906 started her eleventh and last crossing from Trieste to Patras, Algiers and New York. She was sold to Japanese owners in 1907 and renamed "Shinsei Maru" and on 7/1/1945 was bombed and sunk by US aircraft, SW of Formosa (Taiwan) [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.3, p.1279] - [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 13 March 1998]


REGNA GOVERNADORA
See ROYAL TAR.


REICHSTAG
The REICHSTAG was a square-rigged sailing ship built in Glasgow, by Alexander Stephen & Sons, in 1867, and owned by Robert Miles Sloman (from 1876, Robert M. Sloman & Co.). 300 Commerzlasten/722 tons register, 53,10 x 9,17 x 5,68 (length x beam x depth of hold) meters. She was a transient sailer, employed originally in the New York trade; in 1870, however, she was moved to the Australia (Queensland) trade. She sailed from Newcastle upon Tyne, England, on 11 August 1877, bound for Singapore, but was never heard from again [Walter Kresse, Seeschiffs-Verzeichnis der Hamburger Reedereien 1824-1888 , Teil 2, Mitteilungen aus dem Museum fur Hamburgische Geschichte, n.F., Bd. 5 (Hamburg: Museum fur Hamburgische Geschichte, 1969), p. 215. I do not recall if there exists a picture of the REICHSTAG (I do not have a copy of Ernst Hieke, Rob. M. Sloman Jr., errichtet 1793, Veroffentlichungen der Wirtschaftsgeschichtlichen Forschungsstelle e.V., Hamburg, Bd. 30 [Hamburg: Verlag Hanseatischer Merkur, 1968)] at hand), but to determine whether one does in fact exist, and, if so, to obtain a photographic reproduction of it, you should contact the firm of Rob. M. Sloman, Baumwall 3, D-20459 Hamburg. [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 19 August 1997]


REI DE PORTUGAL
See NAPOLITAN PRINCE.


REIHERSTIEG
The REIHERSTIEG belonged to the firm of J. C. Godeffroy & Sohn. She was a brig (a 2-masted, square-rigged sailing vessel), built at Reiherstieg by Godeffroy for his own account in 1851/52 (Bielbrief [certificate of registry], Hamburg 2 April 1852). 100 Commerzlasten; 100.9 x 26.4 x 13.6 Hamburg Fusse (1 Hamburg Fuss =3D .286 meters), length x beam x depth of hold, "zwischen den Steven". Masters: 1852-1854 - T. P. Sparbohm; 1854-1857 - J. Hamann; 1857-1861 - C. Stammerjohann; 1861 - C. P. Tonnissen; 1861-1865 - N. C. Oehlmann; 1865-1866 - J. W. Fruchtenicht; 1866-1868 - J. H. T. N. Wiencke. Voyages: 1852-1854 - Sydney/intermediate ports/Melbourne/Manila; 1854-1855 - Adelaide/Valparaiso/Huasco; 1855-1856 - Valdivia/Valparaiso/Islay; 1856-1857 - Sydney/Caldera/Valparaiso; 1857-1858 - Valdivia/Valparaiso/Caldera; 1858-1860 - Cape of Good Hope/intermediate ports/London; 1860-1861 - Liverpool/London; 1861-1863 - Liverpool/Mazatlan/Valparaiso/Coquimbo; 1863-1865 - Montevideo/intermediate ports/Coquimbo; 1865-1866 - Cape of Good Hope/Adelaide/Valdivia/Valparaiso; 1866-1867 - Apia. The REIHERSTIEG was sold in 1868 to Larsen, of Drobak, Norway, who renamed her HILDA. I have no information on her later history or ultimate fate [Walter Kresse, ed., Seeschiffs-Verzeichnis der Hamburger Reedereien, 1824-1888, Mitteilungen aus dem Museum fur Hamburgische Geschichte, N.F., Bd. 5. (Hamburg: Museum fur Hamburgische Geschichte, 1969), vol. 1, p. 168]. - {Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 15 August 1998]


RELIANCE
The "Reliance" was a 19,618 gross ton ship, built in 1914 by J.C.Tecklenborg as the "Johann Heinrich Burchard" for Hamburg America Line. Her details were - length 590.4ft x beam 72.5ft, three funnels, two masts, triple screw and a speed of 17 knots. There was passenger accommodation for 315-1st, 301-2nd and 850-3rd class. She carried a crew of 480. Launched on 10/2/1914, she was provisionally delivered on 20/11/1915 but due to the Great War, never sailed under her original name. On 8/6/1916 she was handed over to Royal Holland Lloyd as reparations for Dutch neutral ships sunk by the Germans, and renamed "Limburgia". In 1918 the Allies demended the transfer of the ship and a long delay ensued. On 3/2/1920 she left Bremerhaven for Amsterdam, still under claim and then served on the South America route. Finally, in 1922 she was transferred to United American Line, New York under agreement with Germany to re-open a passenger service between New York and Hamburg. She was refitted to carry 290-1st, 320-2nd and 400-3rd class passengers, 19,582 gross tons and renamed "Reliance". On 2/5/1922 she commenced her first Hamburg - Southampton - Cherbourg - New York voyage and in 1923 was transferred to the Panamanian flag. Her last voyage on this service commenced 25/6/1926 and she was then re-acquired by Hamburg America Line. On 24/8/1926 she resumed Hamburg - Southampton - Cherbourg - New York sailings for these owners and in May 1930 was refitted to carry 1st, tourist and 3rd class passengers. In June 1931 she was again altered to carry 1st and tourist class only and on 6/8/1935 started her final Hamburg - New York voyage. She was subsequently engaged in cruising until 1937 when she was modernised by Blohm & Voss, fitted with broader funnels and given accommodation for 633-1st and 186-2nd class passengers. On 7/8/1938 she was gutted by fire at Hamburg and in 1940 was sold and scrapped by Krupp at Bremerhaven. [North Atlantic Seaweay by N.R.P. Bonsor, vol.1, p.418] [Merchant Fleets by Duncan Haws, vol.4, Hamburg America Line] - [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 16 April 1998]

The steamship RELIANCE was built for HAPAG (the Hamburg-America Line) by J. C. Tecklenborg, Geestem"unde (ship #256), and launched on 10 February 1914, as the JOHANN HEINRICH BURCHARD. 19,980 tons; 179,2 (187,4) x 21,9 meters (length x breadth); 3 funnels, 2 masts; triple-screw propulsion, triple-expansion engines and turbines, service speed 17 knots; accommodation for 315 passengers in 1st class, 301 in 2nd class, and 850 in 3rd class; crew of 480. 20 November 1915, delivered to HAPAG; laid up at Bremerhaven. 8 June 1916, sold to the Royal Holland Lloyd Line, for delivery after the war, in compensation for Dutch ships sunk by Germany during the War. The Allies refused to recognize this sale, and claimed the vessel as war reparations. 3 February 1920, the vessel, now renamed LIMBURGIA, sails from Bremerhaven for Amsterdam, successfully evading a British destroyer in the fog; placed by the Royal Holland Holland Lloyd Line in her Amsterdam-South America service. 14 April 1920, maiden voyage, Amsterdam-South America. 1922, sold to United American Lines, New York, and renamed RELIANCE. 3 May 1922, first voyage, Hamburg-Southampton-Cherbourg-New York (coordinated sailing schedule between United American Lines and HAPAG). 1923, to avoid American prohibition restrictions, registered in Panama; 16,798 tons. 27 July 1926, re-purchased by HAPAG; 19,527 tons; passenger accommodation altered to 290 in 1st class, 320 in 2nd class, 400 in 3rd class. 24 August 1926, first voyage for HAPAG, Hamburg-New York; also cruises. 1928, exclusively cruises; 19,802 tons. 1934, passenger accommodation altered to 500 in 1st class. 6 August 1935, last voyage, Hamburg-New York. 1937, rebuilt and modernized by Blohm & Voss, Hamburg; 19,618 tons; 633 passengers in 1st class, 186 passengers in 2nd class. 7 August 1938, gutted by fire in Hamburg harbor and declared a total loss. 4 January 1940, sold to Krupp for scrapping. 1941, scrapped in Bremerhaven [Arnold Kludas and Herbert Bischoff, Die Schiffe der Hamburg-Amerika Linie, Bd. 2: 1907-1926 (Herford: Koehler, 1988), p. 70 (photographs); Arnold Kludas, Die grossen Passagierschiffe der Welt; Eine Dokumentation, Bd. 2: 1913-1923 (2nd ed.; Oldenburg/Hamburg: Gerhard Stalling, c1973), pp. 52-53 (photographs); Noel Reginald Pixell Bonsor,North Atlantic Seaway; An Illustrated History of the Passenger Services Linking the Old World with the New (2nd ed.; Jersey, Channel Islands: Brookside Publications), vol. 1 (1975), p. 418; vol. 4 (1979), p. 1505 (photograph); Bonsor, South Atlantic Seaway; an illustrated history of the passenger lines and liners from Europe to Brazil, Uruguay and Argentina (Jersey, Channel Islands: Brookside Publications, c1983), p. 380]. Also pictured (double-page spread) in Clas Broder Hansen,Passenger liners from Germany, 1816-1990, translated from the German by Edward Force (West Chester, Pennsylvania: Schiffer Pub., c1991), pp. 130-131. - [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 17 April 1998]


REPUBLIC (1)
The "Republic" was built by Harland & Wolff, Belfast in 1903. She was a 15,378 gross ton ship, length 570ft x beam 67.8ft, one funnel, four masts, twin screw and a service speed of 16 knots. There was accommodation for 1st, 2nd and 3rd class passengers. Launched on 26/2/1903 as the "Columbus" for the Dominion Line of Liverpool, she sailed from Liverpool on her maiden voyage to Boston on 1/10/1903. After only two voyages she was taken over, together with the company's Liverpool - Boston service, by the White Star Line. Renamed "Republic" she commenced her first Liverpool - Boston voyage for White Star on 17/12/1903. On 2/1/1904 she started her first Boston - Naples - Genoa sailing and in April 1904 started her last Genoa - Naples - Boston (arr.27th April) crossing. In May 1904 she sailed from Boston to Liverpool and on 22/9/1904 started her last Liverpool - Boston crossing. In October 1904 she sailed from Boston for Naples, Genoa, Naples and New York, and subsequently sailed between New York and Mediterranean ports in the autumn and winter; and Liverpool - Boston in the spring and summer. On 23/1/1909 she collided with the Italian liner "Florida" near Nantucket and sank the following day with the loss of four lives. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P. Bonsor, vol.2, p.763] - [E-mail from Ted Finch - 20 July 1998]


REPUBLIC (2)
See PRESIDENT GRANT.


REPUBLIC (3)
See MAASDAM (2) .


RESOLUTE (1)
The RESOLUTE was a three-masted, square-rigged ship, built by William H. Webb, New York, in 1857, for the Black Star "Line" of New York-Liverpool packets managed by Williams & Guion. Tonnage variously given as 1,645 (Fairburn and Matthews)/1,513 (Cutler); 190 x 40 x 28 feet (length x beam x depth of hold). In the late 1860's, the RESOLUTE, like the other sailing packets, was transferred to service as a general trader, [carrying] coal to ports of the Pacific and the East Coast of South America; barrel oil and cotton to Europe; case oil to the Far East; guano from the Peruvian deposits, etc. In 1871, she was purchased from Williams & Guion by Capt. Jonathan C. Nickels, of Searsport, Maine, to replace his ship WILD ROVER, which had been wrecked. After a few voyages on the RESOLUTE, Nickels retired, being succeeded as captain by his brother, E. D. P. Nickels, then by Wilson C. Nichols, of Searsport, who on a voyage bound from Cardiff to Valparaiso, when a few days from Rio de Janeiro, disappeared from the vessel under mysterious circumstances. The mate turned the vessel back to New Orleans, the closest American port, where E. D. P. Nickels resumed command, and sailed for Europe with a cargo of cotton. Later the RESOLUTE took lumber from Quebec to Australia, proceeding to Hong Kong and New York. She was then "sold Dutch", though she continued to sail under her original name. She was an exceptionally strong vessel, being diagonally iron-strapped, and was one of the few vessels to escape major damage in the tidal wave that swept the coast of Peru in May 1877. In March 1886, rigged as a bark and bound from Philadelphia to Europe, she was abandoned in a sinking condition [Frederick C. Matthews, American Merchant Ships, 1850-1900 [Series I], Marine Research Society Publication No. 21 (Salem: Marine Research Society, 1931), pp. 260-63; William Armstrong Fairburn, Merchant Sail (Center Lovell, Maine: Fairburn Marine Educational Foundation, [1945-55]), II.1255; III.1681; V.2801, 2803, 2806, 2809, 3488; Carl C. Cutler, Queens of the Western Ocean; The Story of America's Mail and Passenger Sailing Lines (Annapolis: United States Naval Institute, c1961) p. 389]. [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 16 December 1997]


RESOLUTE (2)
The "Resolute" was built by AG Weser, Bremen in 1914 for the Hamburg America Line. She was a 19,653 gross ton ship, length 590.4ft x beam 72.2ft, three funnels, two masts, triple screw and a speed of 17 knots. There was accommodation for 290-1st, 320-2nd and 400-3rd class passengers. Launched on 30/3/1914 as the "William O'Swald", she never sailed under that name and was laid up incomplete and transferred in 1916 to Royal Holland Lloyd as reparation for Dutch neutral ships sunk by Germany. She was renamed "Brabantia" and from 1920 was used in the South American service. She was resold in 1922 to the United American Line, renamed "Resolute" and on 11/4/1922 commenced sailing between Hamburg, Southampton, Cherbourg and New York. In 1923 she came under the Panamanian flag and commenced her last voyage on this service on 13/7/1926. In 1926 she was sold to Hamburg America Line and on 10/8/1926 started sailing between Hamburg, Southampton, Cherbourg and New York. She was refitted in June 1930 to carry 1st, tourist and 3rd class passengers, and again in June 1931 to carry 1st and tourist class only. She commenced her last Hamburg - New York voyage on 22/8/1933 and was then used for cruising. On 22/8/1935 she was sold to Italy for scrapping, but was taken over by the Italian government, renamed "Lombardia", refitted to carry 103-1st class and 4,400 troops. Employed as a troopship for the Abyssinian War under the management of Lloyd Triestino and later in the Mediterranean, she was bombed and sunk in dock by allied planes in 1943 at Naples. In 1947 she was scrapped at Spezia. [ North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.1, p.417] [ Merchant Fleets by Duncan Haws, vol.4, Hamburg America Line] [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 10 December 1997]


RESSEL
See P.CALAND.


REX
See KENILWORTH (2).


RHAETIA (1)
"Rhaetia" - Built by Reiherstieg, Hamburg in 1882 for the emigrant service of the Hamburg America Line. She was a 3,467 gross ton vessel, length 350.1ft x beam 42.6ft, one funnel, three masts (the foremast rigged for sail), single screw and a speed of 12 knots. There was accommodation for 96-1st and 1,100-3rd class passengers. Launched on 23/11/1882, she sailed from Hamburg on her maiden voyage to Havre and New York on 4/4/1883. On 4/11/1894 she commenced her last voyage on this service and in 1895 was taken by Harland & Wolff (shipbuilders) in part payment for the new ship "Pennsylvania". She then went to a German company and in 1898 was sold to the US Navy and renamed "Cassius". In 1900, she became a US army transport and was renamed "Sumner". On 11/12/1916 she was wrecked on Barnegat Shoals, NJ. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.1, p.393] [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 15 November 1997]

The steamship RHAETIA was built by Reiherstiegwerft, Hamburg, for the Hamburg American Line, and launched on 23 November 1882. 3,553 tons; 107,11 x 13,07 x 8,86 meters (length x breadth x depth of hold); straight bow, 1 funnel, 3 masts; steel construction, screw propulsion, service speed 12 knots; accommodation for 96 passengers in 1st class and 1,100 in steerage. 4 April 1883, maiden voyage, Hamburg-Havre-New York. 4 November 1894, last voyage, Hamburg-Havre-New York. 1895, taken by Harland & Wolff in part payment for the PENNSYLVANIA; sold to J. H. B"ogel, Hamburg. 24 May 1898, sold to the U.S. Navy and renamed CASSIUS. 1900, SUMNER (U.S. Army transport). 11 December 1916, wrecked on Barnegat Shoals, New Jersey [Walter Kresse, ed., Seeschiffs-Verzeichnis der Hamburger Reedereien, 1824-1888, Mitteilungen aus dem Museum fur Hamburgische Geschichte, N. F., Bd. 5. (Hamburg: Museum fur Hamburgische Geschichte, 1969), vol. 1, p. 198; Arnold Kludas and Herbert Bischoff, Die Schiffe der Hamburg- Amerika-Linie, Bd. 1: 1847-1906 (Herford: Koehler, 1979), p. 40; Noel Reginald Pixell Bonsor, North Atlantic Seaway; An Illustrated History of the Passenger Services Linking the Old World with the New_(2nd ed.; Jersey, Channel Islands: Brookside Publications), vol. 1 (1975), p. 393. Pictured in Michael J. Anuta, Ships of Our Ancestors (Menominee, MI: Ships of Our Ancestors, 1983), p. 280, courtesy of the Peabody Essex Museum, East India Square, Salem, MA 01970. [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer]


RHAETIA (2)
The "Rhaetia" was built by Bremer Vulkan, Vegesack in 1904 for the Hamburg America Line. She was a 6600 gross ton vessel, length 409.5ft x beam 52.7ft, One funnel, two masts, single screw and a speed of 13 knots. There was accommodation for 100-1st class and 800-3rd class passengers. Launched on 5/11/1904, she sailed from Hamburg on her maiden voyage to New York on 27/5/1905. After two round voyages, she was transferred mainly to the South America service except for 24/3/1909 when she sailed from Hamburg for NY for one round voyage. On 17/1/1914 she went back to the Hamburg - Boston service and on 7/7/1914 started her last run from Hamburg to Philadelphia. She stayed there until seized by the US government in 1917 who renamed her "Black Hawk" and in 1918 she went to the US Shipping Board who renamed her "Black Arrow". On 25/9/1919 she commenced her first voyage for the American Line from New York to Constantinople, Smyrna and New York and made two round voyages on this service before going to the NY and Cuba Mail Co.[Ward Line, who also owned the "Morro Castle"] who used her for three trips between NY and Spain before she was scrapped in 1924. [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Ted Finch - 11 September 1997]


RHEA
See ALFRED.


RHEIN (1)
The "Rhein" was a 450 gross ton, three masted barque, built in 1849. She was constructed of wood, and carried 20-1st class and 200-steerage passengers. She sailed between Hamburg and New York for the Hamburg America Line from 1849 to 1858 when she was sold. [ Merchant Fleets by Duncan Haws, vol.4, Hamburg America Line] [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 17 December 1997]

The Hamburg bark RHEIN was built by von Somm, Hamburg, in 1847/48 for the Hamburg-Amerikanische Packetfahrt-A.G. (Hamburg-American Line) (Bielbrief [certificate of registry], 6 December 1848). 180 Commerzlasten; 131.7 x 29 x 17.4 Hamburg feet (1 Hamburg Fuss = .286 meters) (length x beam x depth of hold), "zwischen den Steven". Master: 1849-1851 - H. Ehlers; 1851-1854 - P. Popp; 1854 - G. Maass; 1854-1856 - P. H. Haack; 1856-1858 - J. M. T. Spier; 1858-1864 - J. F. W. Boster. Voyages:1849-1857 - New York; 1858/61 - New York/Rio de Janeiro/intermediate ports/London; 1861/64 - Singapore/Hong Kong/intermediate ports . She was sold in Singapore in 1864 [Walter Kresse, ed., Seeschiffs- Verzeichnis der Hamburger Reedereien, 1824-1888, Mitteilungen aus dem Museum fur Hamburgische Geschichte, N. F., Bd. 5. (Hamburg: Museum fur Hamburgische Geschichte, 1969), vol. 1, p. 187]. For additional information, including pictures, see Arnold Kludas and Herbert Bischoff, Die Schiffe der Hamburg- Amerika-Linie, Bd. 1: 1847-1906 (Herford: Koehler, 1979). [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 17 December 1997]


RHEIN (2)
The "Rhein" was built by Caird & Co, Greenock in 1868 for Norddeutscher Lloyd [North German Lloyd]. Her details were - 2,901 gross tons, length 332ft x beam 40ft, clipper stem, one funnel, two masts, iron construction, single screw and a speed of 13 knots. There was accommodation for 70-1st, 100-2nd and 600-3rd class passengers. Launched in August 1868, she sailed on her maiden voyage from Bremen to Southampton and New York on 3/10/1868. In 1878 her engines were compounded by the builders and on 16/10/1889 she left Bremen on her last voyage to Baltimore and New York. On 18/9/1890 she commenced her last Bremen - Baltimore voyage and the following year was sold to a British company. She was scrapped in 1893.1893. [ North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.2, p.546] [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 2 November 1997]

SS Rhein - Norddeutscher Lloyd Line (North German Lloyd). Years of service 1868-1886. Built at Clyde Caird shipyard, headliner of class of ships known as 'Rhein series,' 3100 tons, 348 x 40 ft. 1funnel, 2 masts iron hull, 13 1/2 knots. Sistership to SS Main, SS Donau, SS Mosel ie, nearly identical. 1873-1874 season New-York to Southampton in 9d 10h. Sold in 1891 and scrapped in 1893. [Posted to The ShipsList by Paul Petersen - 27 November 1997]

The steamship RHEIN was built by Caird & Co, Greenock, Scotland, for Norddeutscher Lloyd and launched in August 1868. She had been laid down as the ODER, but was delivered as the RHEIN, to replace the vessel originally laid down as the RHEIN, but sold on the stocks to the Royal Mail Steamship Co, and launched in February 1868 as the NEVA. 2902 tons; 106,1 x 12,22 meters (length x breadth); clipper bow, 1 funnel, 2 masts; iron construction, screw propulsion, service speed 12 knots; accommodation for 70 1st-, 100 2nd-, and 604 steerage-class passengers; crew of 100+. 3 October 1868, maiden voyage, Bremen-Southampton-New York. 1878, engines compounded and new boilers by builders; service speed 13 knots. 18 September 1890, last voyage, Bremen-Baltimore. 1891, sold to Gray, Liverpool. 1892, resold to A. Rimner, Liverpool (register shows Caird's as owner); 1893, sold to Jaeger Brothers, Liverpool. June 1894, broken up in Barrow-in-Furness [Edwin Drechsel, Norddeutscher Lloyd Bremen, 1857-1970; History, Fleet, Ship Mails, vol. 1 (Vancouver: Cordillera Pub. Co., c1994), p.. 48; Noel Reginald Pixell Bonsor, North Atlantic Seaway; An Illustrated History of the Passenger Services Linking the Old World with the New (2nd ed.; Jersey, Channel Islands: Brookside Publications), vol. 2 (1978), p. 546]. Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 8 January 1998]


RHEIN (3)
The "Rhein" was the second vessel of this name owned by Norddeutscher Lloyd [North German Lloyd] of Bremen. Built be Blohm & Voss, Hamburg in 1899, she was a 10,058 gross ton ship, length 501ft x beam 58.5ft, one funnel, four masts, twin screw and a speed of 14 knots. There was accommodation for 148-1st, 116-2nd and 2,500-3rd class passengers. Launched on 20/9/1899 she sailed from Bremen on her maiden voyage to New York on 9/12/1899. On 6/5/1900 she commenced her first Bremen - Baltimore voyage and on 11/4/1901 sailed from New York to Bremen with 1st,2nd and 3rd class passengers but subsequently carried 369-2nd, 217-3rd and 2,865-4th class. On 11/9/1901 she commenced the first of four round voyages from Bremen to Australia via Suez, but between 1900 and 1911 mainly ran between Bremen and New York and/or Baltimore. On 18/5/1911 she commenced her first voyage from Bremen to Philadelphia and on 9/4/1914 made her last sailing from Bremen to New York and Baltimore and on 16/7/1914 commenced her last Bremen - Baltimore voyage (arr 29/7). In April 1917 she was seized by the US authorities at Baltimore, renamed "Susquehanna" and rebuilt to 9,959 tons. She was chartered to US Mail Steamship Co and commenced her first voyage from New York to Bremen and Danzig on 4/8/1920. She then had accommodation for 500-cabin class and 2,500-3rd class passengers. She made six round voyages on this service, the last commencing 6/4/1921 and then went to the United States Line. She commenced sailing between New York, Plymouth, Cherbourg and Bremen on 4/3/1922, and sailed on her last voyage on this service on 31/8/1922 (5 round voyages) and was sold to Japan in Nov.1928 and was scrapped. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.1, p.562] [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Ted Finch - 20 November 1997]

The RHEIN was the type-ship of the Norddeutscher Lloyd RHEIN-class of steamships, designed as freight/emigrant carriers. 9 December 1899, maiden voyage, Bremen-New York. 6 May 1900, first voyage, Bremen- Baltimore. 1900-1911, primarily Bremen-New York and/or Baltimore; also used as a naval transport during the Boxer Expedition and later. 11 September 1901, first voyage, Bremen-Suez Canal-Australia. 23 November 1904, last voyage, Bremen-Suez Canal-Australia (4 roundtrip voyages). 1906, passenger accommodation altered to 302 in 2nd class ("including sofas") and 2,774 in steerage. 18 May 1911, first voyage, Bremen-Philadelphia. 9 April 1914, last voyage, Bremen-New York-Baltimore. 16 July 1914, last voyage, Bremen-Baltimore (arrived 29 July). August 1914, interned at Baltimore. 6 April 1917, seized at Baltimore by the U.S. Government; renamed SUSQUEHANNA (U.S. Navy transport). September 1917-September 1919, middle two masts shortened. 1919, transferred to U.S. Shipping Board; laid up. 4 August 1920-6 April 1921, 6 roundtrip voyages in charter to the U.S. Mail Lines, New York-Bremen-Danzig; accommodation for 500 passengers in cabin and 2,500 in 3rd class. 4 March-31 August 1922, 5 roundtrip voyages in charter to the U.S. Lines, New York- Plymouth-Cherbourg-Bremen; laid up. 1925, sold to Fincke, Bangert & Co, Philadelphia. November 1928, sold to Japan for scrapping. 25 February 1929, arrived at Yokohama under the Japanese flag; scrapped [Edwin Drechsel, Norddeutscher Lloyd Bremen, 1857-1970; History, Fleet, Ship Mails, vol. 1 (Vancouver: Cordillera Pub. Co., c1994), pp. 191-192 (photographs); Arnold Kludas, Die grossen Passagierschiffe der Welt; eine Dokumentation, Bd. 1: 1858-1912 (2nd ed.; Oldenburg/Hamburg: Gerhard Stalling, c1972), pp. 74-75 (photograph); Noel Reginald Pixell Bonsor, North Atlantic Seaway; An Illustrated History of the Passenger Services Linking the Old World with the New (2nd ed.; Jersey, Channel Islands: Brookside Publications), vol. 2 (1978), p. 562]. Also pictured in Michael J. Anuta, Ships of Our Ancestors (Menominee, MI: Ships of Our Ancestors, 1983), p. 280, courtesy of the Peabody Essex Museum, East India Square, Salem, MA 01970. - [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 17 Apr 1998]


RHENANIA
The steamship RHENANIA was built by Dobie & Co, Glasgow (engines by J.Howden & Co, Glasgow), for the Hamburg American Line's West Indies services, and launched on 2 December 1880. 1,845 tons; 87,17 x 10,48 meters (286 x 34.4 feet, length x beam); straight bow, 1 funnel, 2 masts; iron construction, screw propulsion, service speed 11 knots; passenger accommodation: 20 1st-, 300 steerage-class. 24 October 1881, first voyage, Hamburg-New York. 9 April 1882, last voyage, Hamburg-New York (3 roundtrip voyages). 16 February 1889, first voyage, Hamburg-Baltimore (1 roundtrip voyage). 12 July 1890, first voyage, Hamburg-Philadelphia (2 roundtrip voyages). 10 December 1892, first voyage, Hamburg-Boston (1 roundtrip voyage). 1903, RHENANIA (German). 1904, SICILY (Gulf). 1907, LOURDES (French). 1907, EGEO (Italian). 31 March 1916, torpedoed and sunk by submarine in the Mediterranean [Bonsor, North Atlantic Seaway]. [Posted to the Emigration-Ships mailing List by Michael Palmer - 14 November 1997]


RHYNA
See RHYNLAND.


RHYNLAND
The "Rhynland" was built by Barrow Shipbuilding Co. in 1879 for the Red Star Line. She was a 3,689 gross ton ship, length 402.8ft x beam 40.2ft, one funnel, four masts, iron construction, single screw and a speed of 14 knots. Accommodation was provided for 150-1st and 1,000-3rd class passengers. Launched on 10/3/1879, she sailed from Antwerp on her maiden voyage to New York on 10/6/1879. On 27/7/1895 she commenced her last voyage on this service and was then chartered to the American Line. In August 1895 she started sailing between Philadelphia and Liverpool and was altered to carry 150-2nd and 1,000-3rd class passengers. On 4/3/1903 she commenced her last voyage on this service and on 29/4/1903 went back to the Red Star Line route from Philadelphia to Antwerp with 3rd class only. She made her last sailing on 28/12/1904 on this route and then resumed sailings between Antwerp and New York. Her last voyage commenced on 22/5/1906 and later the same year she was sold to Italian owners who renamed her "Rhyna". She was scrapped later the same year. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P. Bonsor, vol.2, p.852] This company operated ships under the Belgian, US and British flags. The "Rhynland" sailed under the Belgian flag. There is a brief history of the company in North Atlantic Seaway ISBN 0 905824 01 6. [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 4 December 1997]

The steamship RHYNLAND was built for the Red Star Line by the Barrow Shipbuilding Co, Barrow-in-Furness, England, and launched on 10 March 1879. 3,689 tons; 122,76 x 12,25 meters/402.8 x 40.2 feet (length x breadth); straight bow, 1 funnel, 4 masts; iron construction, screw propulsion, service speed 14 knots; accommodation for 150 passengers in 1st class and 1,000 in steerage. 10 June 1879, maiden voyage, Antwerp-New York. 27 July 1895, last voyage, Antwerp-New York. August 1895-4 March 1903, Philadelphia-Liverpool, for the American Line (charter) (150 passengers in 2nd class, 1,000 in steerage). April 1903, returned to Red Star Line. 29 April 1903-28 December 1904, Philadelphia-Antwerp (steerage only). 28 March 1905-22 May 1906, 3 roundtrip voyages, Antwerp-New York. 1906, RHYNA (Italian); scrapped in Italy [Noel Reginald Pixell Bonsor, North Atlantic Seaway; An Illustrated History of the Passenger Services Linking the Old World with the New (2nd ed.; Jersey, Channel Islands: Brookside Publications), vol. 2 (1978), p. 852]. Pictured in Michael J. Anuta, Ships of Our Ancestors (Menominee, MI: Ships of Our Ancestors, 1983), p. 281, courtesy of the Peabody Essex Museum, East India Square, Salem, MA 01970 - [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 18 April 1998]


RICHARD RUSH
The S.S. Richard Rush was a standard WW2 Liberty Ship. Built by: Willamette Iron and Steel Corp. Portlaand, Oregon. Hull number 621. Built Jan. 1943. Scrapped in Philda. Pa 1961. LOA 441 ft. 6 inches. Breadth 56 ft. 10 3/4 inches. Depth 37 ft. 4 inches. Draft 26 foot 10 inches. Steel Hull ( not concrete). GT 7176. DWT 10,414. SHP 2500. Speed 11.0 knots at 72 rpm. Named after ..U.S.Attorney General 1814-1817. Was at one time Secretry of State, under President Monroe Secretary of the Treasury 1825. b 1780 d 1831. - {Posted to The ShipsList by Captain C.J.Carroll - 23 April 1998]


RIGA (1)
In the 1887-88 Lloyd's Register of Shipping: Call sign: MDBC Master: Captain L. Baltzer, appointed to the ship in 1875. Rigging: iron single screw steam Schooner; 1 deck; 2 tier of beams; 5 cemented bulkheands. Tonnage: 614 tons gross, 498 under deck and 452 net. Dimensions: 181.4 feet long, 27.3 foot beam and 14.8 feet deep. Poop 96 feet long; Forecastle 26 feet long. Built: in 1875 by Hansa Iron Ship Yard in Rostock. Propulsion: compound inverted engine with 2 cylinders of 24 & 40 inches diameter respectively; stroke 27 inches; operating at 71 p.s.i.; 80 horsepower; new boilers in 1883; engine built by the same company as the hull. Owners: Dampfschiff - fahrts Actien Gesellschaft. Port of registry: Rostock. - [Posted to The ShipsList by Gilbert Provost - 13 October 1998]


RIGA (2)
In the 1887-88 Lloyd's Register of Shipping: Master: Captain Gnirck. Rigging: iron single screw steam Schooner; 1 deck; 4 cemented bulkheads. Tonnage: 516 tons gross and 386 net. Dimensions: 181.1 feet long, 22.2 foot beam and 12.2 feet deep; Raised Quarter Deck 77 feet long; Forecastle 26 feet long; ship lengthened in 1884.Built: in 1878 by Murdoch & Murray in Port Glasgow. Propulsion: compound inverted engine with 2 cylinders of 20 & 36 inches diameter respectively; stroke 24 inches; operating at 65 p.s.i.; 65 horsepower; engine built by W. King & Co. in Glasgow. Owners: Hofrichter & Mahn. Port of registry: Stettin. . - [Posted to The ShipsList by Gilbert Provost - 13 October 1998]


RIGA (3)
In the 1887-88 Lloyd's Register of Shipping: ex. Aziz, ex. Eugenie, ex. Princess Dagmar. Master: Captain Schmidt, appointed to the ship in 1885 Rigging: iron single screw steamer; 1 deck; 4 bulkheads. Tonnage: 380 tons gross and 297 net. Dimensions: 196 feet long, 24.5 foot beam and 12 feet deep; Poop 92 feet long. Built: in 1863 by Henderson Coulborn & Co. in Renfrew. Propulsion: compound inverted engine with 2 cylinders of 24 & 36 inches diameter respectively; stroke 24 inches; 80 horsepower; engine built by Felser & Co. in Riga. Owners: Riga Steam Ship Co. Port of registry: Riga. . - [Posted to The ShipsList by Gilbert Provost - 13 October 1998]


RIGA (4)
See BELGRAVIA (2) .


RIJNDAM
See RYNDAM .


RIMUTAKA (1)
RIMUTAKA (1) was a 4,473 gross ton ship built in 1884 by John Elder, Glasgow for NZSCo. She was a clipper stemmed ship, one funnel, three masts (rigged for sail), length 430ft x beam 46ft x depth 24ft, single screw and a speed of 14 knots. Launched in October 1884, she sailed on her maiden voyage from London for Cape Towm, Auckland and Wellington on 15/1/1885. She continued on this service until starting her last voyage on 30/3/1899. Later the same year she was sold to the British India Steam Nav.Co and renamed "Zamania". Used on the Madras - Straits Settlements route and in July 1911 was scrapped in Japan. [North Star to Southern Cross by John M.Maber] [Merchant Fleets, vol.11,British India S.N.Co by Duncan Haws] - [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 2 June 1998]


RIMUTAKA (2)
RIMUTAKA (2) was built by Wm Denny, Dumbarton in 1900 for NZSCo. She was a 7,765 gross ton ship, twin screw, 14 knots, accommodation for 40-1st, 50-2nd and 250-3rd class passengers. She commenced London - Cape Town - Auckland - Wellington sailings on 3/1/1901 and continued on this service until 1920 except for the war years. On 23/12/1920 she commenced Southampton - Panama - Auckland - Wellington voyages and started her last sailing on this route on 15/11/1929. She was scrapped the following year.[North Star to Southern Cross by John M.Maber] - [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 2 June 1998]


RIMUTAKA (3)
RIMUTAKA (3) was a 16,576 gross ton ship, built by Armstrong Whitworth, Newcastle in 1923 as the "Mongolia" for the Peninsular & Oriental Steam Nav. Co (P&O Line). This was a twin screw, 16 knot steamer, one funnel, two masts, with accommodation for 840-tourist class passengers. Becoming surplus to P&O's requirements, she transferred under long term charter to NZSCo in 1938, was renamed "Rimutaka" and started London - Panama - Auckland - Wellington sailings on 8/12/1938. Her last sailing on this route commenced 11/10/1949 and in February 1950 she was sold to Cia de Nav.Ingres, Panama and renamed "Europa". Transferred to Liberian registry in 1952 and renamed "Nassau" and in 1961 was sold to Nav.Turisticana Mexicana, Mexico, renamed "Acapulco" and used as a cruise ship. She was eventually scrapped in Japan in 1964. [North Star to Southern Cross by John M.Maber] - [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 2 June 1998]


RIO DE LA PLATA
See CHARGER.


RIO SANTA CRUZ
See OHIO (3).


RJUKAN
See ERNST MORITZ ARNDT (1).


ROBERT E.LEE
See GENERAL LE ROY ELTINGE.


ROBERT TOOMBS
See GENERAL LE ROY ELTINGE.


ROCHAMBEAU
The "Rochambeau" was built by Chantiers & Ateliers de St Nazaire, St Nazaire in 1911 for Compagnie Generale Transatlantique (French Line). She was a 12,678 gross ton ship, length 559.4ft x beam 63.7ft, two funnels, two masts, twin screw and a speed of 15 knots. There was passenger accommodation for 428-2nd and 1,700-3rd class. Launched on 2/3/1911, she sailed from Havre on her maiden voyage to New York on 16/9/1911. She started her last voyage on this service on 7/3/1915 and on 4/4/1915 commenced Bordeaux - New York sailings. Her last sailing on this route commenced 9/1/1919 and she was then refitted to carry 475-cabin and 1,450-3rd class passengers. On 18/2/1919 she resumed Havre - New York voyages and in August 1926 was altered to carry cabin and tourist class. Again altered in December 1927 for cabin, tourist and 3rd class, she made her last Havre - Vigo - New York sailing in July 1933 and was scrapped at Dunkirk the following year. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P. Bonsor, vol.2, p.661] - [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 16 April 1998]


ROCHESTER
See BREVERHAVEN.


ROCKLAND
The ship ROCKLAND was built in 1850 in Rockland Maine. The ship is said to have changed its name to the Prince of Wales In his spare time since 1980 Bertram Snow has been reconstructing the shipbuilding History of Rockland. In 1854 a major fire destroyed all shipbuilding records at Waldoboro, Maine for the District that Rockland was a part of. The local newspaper has all the old papers and it has meant his going through them and pulling out the info. The National Archives at Washington, DC has been a great help. Plus so many people found out what he was doing and they sent info. In writing all over the World he has been able to pull in some info and made a History of his family's shipyard 182 - 1937 also. Proof of ROCKLAND which once carried my ggg Sheppard Parkman Smiley: Built by Deacon GEORGE THOMAS who built the Ship ROCKLAND, and the Clipper RED JACKET. 1850 Ship ROCKLAND 169.3 x 43.4 x 17.2 922 Gross tons. Billet Head bow. Square stern. Three (3) masts. Two (2) decks. Launched Tuesday ? Registered ? 1st. sailed ? 1864 Was sold foreign, and renamed PRINCE of WALES, hailed from RAMSGATE, England 1866. 1882 Local newspaper issue - Week of July 18th. This vessel in her early days carried EMIGRANTS from ENGLAND to AUSTRALIA. Also, coal to CHINA. At CHINA her masts were taken out and a roof put on her spaceous flush deck, and was transformed into a coal "hulk," towed 600 miles up the YANGTZE river to HANKOW.She was moored and a fine bridge connecting her from the shore at the AMERICAN firm of RUSSELL and CO. company's wharf whose steamers embarked passengers and loaded cargo from. 1877 she was sold to a CHINESE CO. This information came from Bertram Snow of Rockland City. He is the gg grandson of the ship builders. - [Email from Keith Smiley - 16 March 1998]


ROLAND (1)
The ROLAND was a 3-masted, square-rigged ship, built by Johann Lange, of Vegesack/Grohn, for the Bremen firm of Gebr[uder] Kulenkampff, and launched on 7 September 1854. 319 Commerzlasten; 40,7 x 10,3 x 5,9 meters (length x beam x depth of hold). Masters: Heinrich Reiche (1854-1859), H. H. Wicke (1859-1863), and F. A. Wiegmann (1863-1865). In October 1865, the ROLAND, bound from Surabaja, Indonesia, to Amsterdam, was lost on the Indonesian island of Pulo Raas. Source: Peter-Michael Pawlik, Von der Weser in die Welt; Die Geschichte der Segelschiffe von Weser und Lesum und ihrer Bauwerften 1770 bis 1893, Schriften des Deutschen Schiffahrtsmuseums, Bd. 33 (Hamburg: Kabel, c1993), pp. 226-227. - [E-mail from Michael Palmer - 26 June 1998]


ROLAND (2)
The "Roland" was built by Sir W.G.Armstrong, Mitchell & Co, Walker-on-Tyne in 1893 and was bought on the stocks by Norddeutscher Lloyd [North German Lloyd]. She was a 3,603 gross ton ship, length 345ft x beam 43.8ft, one funnel, two masts, single screw and a speed of 12 knots. There was accommodation for 28-2nd and 800-3rd class passengers. Launched on 1/5/1893, she sailed from Bremen on her maiden voyage to New York on 13/9/1893. On 9/12/1893 she commenced her first voyage from Bremen to South America and on 27/8/1896 started her first run on the Bremen - Baltimore route. She commenced her last N.Atlantic voyage on 15/2/1906 from Bremen to Baltimore (30 round voyages on N.Atlantic) and her last Bremen - S.America voyage on 7/8/1909 (16 S.Atlantic voyages). On 11/11/1910 she sailed on her last Bremen - Havana run (3 round voyages). In 1911 she was sold to a Turkish company who renamed her "Bahriahmer" and on 7/11/1914 she was sunk by the Russian Navy off Eregli, Black Sea. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.2, p.557] [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 6 November 1997]


ROLLO
The "Rollo" was a North Sea and Baltic trader belonging to the Wilson Line of Hull. A 1,568 gross ton vessel built in 1870 by Earle's Shipbuilding, Hull. She had a length of 260ft x beam 32.3ft and was sold in 1909 to the Nordenhamer S.B. for scrapping at Einwarden [The Wilson Line of Hull, 1831-1981 by A.G.Credland & M.Thompson]. [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 2 December 1997]


ROMA
The "Roma" was built by G.Ansaldo & Co, Sestri Ponente, Italy in 1926 for Navigazione Generale Italiana. She was a 32,583 gross ton ship, overall length 709ft x beam 82.6ft, two funnels, two masts, four propellers and a speed of 20 knots. There was capacity for 375-1st, 300-2nd, 300-intermediate and 700-3rd class passengers. Launched on 26th Feb.1926, she sailed from Genoa for Naples and New York on 21st Sep.1926. In Nov.1931 she made her last voyage on this service and in 1932 came under the control of the Italian company 'Italia'. She resumed Genoa - Naples - New York sailings for her new owners on 15th Jan.1932, and in Apr.1933 was refitted to accommodate 1st, 2nd, tourist and 3rd class passengers. In February and April 1935 she made two Trieste - New York voyages under charter to Cosulich Line and was then transferred to the Genoa - Naples - South America service. On 29th Apr.1940 she made a single round voyage between Trieste - Venice - New York and Genoa and in 1943 was converted to an aircraft carrier for the Italian navy and renamed "Aquila". She was damaged by bombing at Genoa on 16th Jun.1944, and on 19th Apr.1945 was sunk by aerial torpedoes. The wreck was towed to Spezia in 1945 and was scrapped in 1951. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P. Bonsor, vol.4, p.1617] - [Posted to the ShipsList by Ted Finch - 11 October 1998]

Here is what the Lloyd's Register of Shipping lists: ROMA Call sign: PEUS Official registration #: 1407. Rigging: steel quadruple screw steamer; 4 steel decks and weather deck sheathed in teak; 5th and 6th steel deck in holds; 12 bulkheads partly cemented (9 up to the upper deck, 2 to the 2nd deck and 1 to the 3rd deck); flat keel; Water Ballast: cellular double bottom 579 feet long, 4,622 tons; deep tank aft 172 tons; Forward Peak Tank 145 tons; Aft Peak Tank 185 tons; fitted with electric light, wireless and refrigerating machinery. Tonnage: 32,583 tons gross, 21,015 under deck and 19,358 net. Dimensions: 705.6 feet long, 82.8 foot beam and 38.9 feet deep; Bridge 393 feet long; Forecastle 64 feet long. Built: in 1926 by Ansaldo Societa Anonima in Sestri Ponente. Propulsion: 8 steam turbines, single reduction geared to 4 screw shafts. Engine operating at 220 p.s.i.; 5,553 nominal horsepower; 9 double ended and 4 single ended boilers, 66 corrugated furnaces; heating surface 59,200 sq. ft.. Forced draught. Engine built by same company as the hull. Owners: Navigazione Generale Italiana Port of registry: Genoa. Flag: Italian. - [Posted to The ShipsList by Gilbert Provost - 13 October 1998]


ROMANIC
See NEW ENGLAND.


ROMANOW
See SIR ISAAC NEWTON.


ROMAN PRINCE (of 1898 & 1899)
See PRINCE LINE FREIGHTERS


ROMANTIC
See SCANDINAVIAN or NEW ENGLAND.


ROMANZA
See BEAVERBRAE.


ROME
The ship ROME, of Bath, ME, Otis, master, arrived at the port of New York on 11 July 1852, 42 days out of Le Havre. The ROME was a 3-masted, square-rigged vessel, built in Bath, Maine, in 1847, 673 tons, 142' 4" x 32' 3" x 16' 1 1/2" (length x beam x depth of hold). She appears to have been a transient, sailing in 1852 between Le Havre and New York, in 1853, J. Gross, master, between Bremen and New York, and in 1854, J. Gross, master, between Antwerp and New York. In 1854, Moulton, master, she was advertised as running in the Brigham Line of New York-New Orleans coastal packets, and in 1858, W. Lincoln, master, in the Stanton & Thompson Line of New York-New Orleans coastal packets [William Armstrong Fairburn, Merchant Sail (Center Lovell, ME: Fairburn Marine Educational Foundation, [1945-55]), V.3196; Car C. Cutler, Queens of the Western Ocean; The Story of America's Mail and Passenger Sailing Lines (Annapolis: United States Naval Institute, c1961), pp. 521 and 524]. I have no further information on the ROME. However, as the vessel was built and registered at Bath, it is quite possible that the Maine Maritime Museum, 243 Washington St., Bath, ME 04530, may have additional information on her. [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 18 August 1997]


ROMEO
The "Romeo" was a 1,885 gross ton ship built in 1881 by Earle's of Hull for the Wilson Line of Hull. Her length was 275ft x beam 34.6ft, single funnel, two masts and single screw. She was sunk on 3.3.1918 when torpedoed by the German submarine U-102, 7 miles south of the Mull of Galloway, while on passage to Liverpool in ballast. 29 crew including the master were lost.[The Wilson Line of Hull by A.G.Credland & M.Thompson]. There is an excellent photo of this ship in The Wilson Line of Hull, 1831 - 1981 by Arthur G.Credland and Michael Thompson, published by Hutton Press Ltd, 130 Canada Drive, Cherry Burton, Beverley, East Yorkshire, HU17 7SB, UK. The ISBN is 1 872167 58 6. {Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 6 December 1997]

The steamship ROMEO was built by Earle's Shipbuilding & Engineering Co Ltd, Hull, in 1881, for the Wilson Line of Hull. 1885 tons; 260 x 34 x 17.9 feet (length x breadth x depth of hold); 1 funnel, 2 masts; single screw propulsion (2 cylinder compound engine, 350 nhp), service speed 12.5 knots; accommodation for 38 passengers in 1st class, 18 in 2nd class, 780 in steerage. The ROMEO was sunk on 3 March 1918, torpedoed by German submarine U-102, 7 miles south of the Mull of Galloway, on a passage to Liverpool, in ballast; 29 of the crew, including the captain, were lost [Arthur G. Credland and Michael Thompson, The Wilson Line of Hull, 1831 to 1981; The Rise and Fall of an Empire (Cherry Burton, Beverley, East Yorkshire: Hutton Press, 1994), pp. 40 (photograph) and 54]. - [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 7 August 1998]


ROSCOMMON
See OSWESTRY GRANGE.


ROSE HAMBLETON
The ROSE HAMBLETON was a side-wheel packet, built at Cincinnati, Ohio, in 1861. 154 tons; wood hull. 6 June 1866, Capt. Charles Beers, arrived at Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, and loaded for St. Louis, departing the next day. Reported sold at Cincinnati to Capt. John Claycomb, 19 November 1866, and would load for the Arkansas River with Nip Simonton in the office. Reported lost, but with no details, 30 September 1869 [Frederick Way, Jr., Way's Packet Directory, 1848-1994; Passenger Steamboats of the Mississippi River System Since the Advent of Photography in Mid-Continent America (revised edition; Athens, Ohio: Ohio University Press, 1994) p. 402, packet #4839]. [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 16 December 1997]


ROSLIN CASTLE
The "Roslin Castle" was built by Barclay, Curle & Co, Glasgow for the Castle Line. She was a 4,267 gross ton ship, length 378ft x beam 48.3ft, one funnel, two masts, iron construction, single screw and a speed of 15 knots. There was accommodation for 158-1st and 84-2nd class passengers. Launched on April 24th 1883, she commenced her maiden voyage in August and sailed to Lisbon and South Africa. She was a troublesome ship and gained a reputation as a heavy roller. In 1888 she was returned to her builders to be modernised and to remedy her defects. Here she was lengthened by 15ft, her stern rebuilt and passenger accommodation improved and fitted her with compound engines. Her tonnage was increased to 4,487 tons and she returned to the South Africa Mail service. In 1899 she was taken over for trooping service during the Boer War and appears to have continued on this service until 1902 when she returned to the mail service. In 1905 she was sold to German owners and renamed "Regina" intended to act as a collier and store ship for the Russian fleet that was bound for Vladivostok. Sent to East Africa, she ran aground off Mozambique in May 1905, and lay there for several months until refloated in November. She was towed to Durban and patched up sufficiently to enable her to sail to Europe, but was not considered worth repairing permanently and was sold to shipbreakers at Genoa and scrapped the following year. ["A Castle of the Eighties" by J.H.Isherwood, Sea Breezes magazine, August 1956] - [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 21 Janaury 1998]


ROSSIJA (1)
See HOLSATIA.


ROSSIJA (2)
See LATVIA.


ROTTERDAM (1)
The "Rotterdam" of 1880 was a 1,694 gross ton ship, built by Henderson, Colbourn & Co, Glasgow in 1872. Her details were - length 254.8ft x beam 35.1ft, straight stem, one funnel, two masts (rigged for sail), iron construction, single screw and a speed of 10 knots. There was accommodation for 8-1st and 288-3rd class passengers. Launched on 6/6/1872 for Plate, Reuchlin & Co of Rotterdam, she sailed on her maiden voyage from Rotterdam to Plymouth and New York on 15/10/1872. In April 1873 she came under the control of the Holland America Line and commenced sailings for these owners on 4/5/1873 when she sailed from Rotterdam for New York. She commenced her final voyage on 18/8/1883 when she left Rotterdam for New York and was wrecked on the Dutch coast near the Isle of Schouwen on the 26th September, with no loss of life. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.3,p.908]- [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 24 February 1998]


ROTTERDAM (2)
(of 1897) See DWINSK.


ROTTERDAM (3)
This "Rotterdam" was the fourth of five vessels with this name owned by the Holland America Line. She was built in 1908 by Harland & Wolff, Belfast and was a 24,149 gross ton ship, length 650.5ft x beam 77.4ft, two funnels, two masts, twin screw and a speed of 16 knots. There was passenger accommodation for 530-1st, 555-2nd and 2,124-3rd class. Launched on 3/3/1908, she sailed from Rotterdam on her maiden voyage to New York on 13/6/1908. She commenced her last voyage on this service on 23/2/1916 and was then laid up at Rotterdam (although Holland was a neutral country during the Great War, several Dutch ships had been damaged by mines). She resumed service between Rotterdam, Brest and New York on 24/1/1919 and in 1920 was converted to oil fuel. In April 1926 her accommodation was altered to carry 1st, 2nd, tourist, and 3rd class passengers; in Jan 1930, 1st, tourist and 3rd class; in June 1936, cabin, tourist and 3rd; and in May 1937, cabin and tourist class. On 21/11/1939 she sailed from Rotterdam on her final voyage to New York (dep 7/12/1939) and Rotterdam (arr 28/12/1939) and in Jan 1940 was scrapped at Hendrik Ido, Ambacht. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.3,p.913] [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 9 January 1998]


ROUSILLON
The "Roussillon" was built by AG Weser, Bremen in 1906 as the "Goeben" for North German Lloyd of Bremen. She was a 8,800 gross ton ship, length 462.1ft x beam 57.6ft, one funnel, two masts, twin screw and a speed of 14 knots. There was accommodation for 281-cabin class and 1,333-3rd class passengers. Launched on 11/12/1906, she sailed on NGL's Far East service until June 1911 when she made her first Bremen - Southampton - Suez - Fremantle - Adelaide and Sydney voyage. She made a second round voyage on this route and then reverted to the Far East service. In August 1914, at the outbreak of the Great War, she was interned at Vigo and in 1919 was transferred to French ownership, renamed "Roussillon" and came under the control of Compagnie Generale Transatlantique (French Line). On 28/9/1920 she started her first Marseilles - New York voyage and on 3/12/1920 commenced Havre - New York sailings. Her last voyage on this service started on 18/9/1923 and on 1/11/1923 she transferred to Bordeaux - New York voyages. Her final Bordeaux - New York sailing took place on 24/8/1930 and in February 1931 she was scrapped at Pasajes, Spain. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P. Bonsor, vol.2, p.662] [North Star to Southern Cross by John M.Maber] - [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 7 May 1998]


ROWANMORE
The Rowanmore was a 9,455 gross ton cargo ship belonging to Johnston Warren Lines of Liverpool. She was built in 1900 by C.Connell & Co of Glasgow specifically for the company's Baltimore trade but was also used in their Gulf of Mexico service. I don't have any further information on this ship. [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 5 December 1997]


ROYAL GEORGE
SS ROYAL GEORGE was built by Fairfield of Glasgow, Scotland in 1907 and launched as the SS HELIOPOLIS for Mediterranean service. In 1910 she was sold to Canadian Northern SS Co and renamed ROYAL GEORGE. During WWI she was used for trooping and during this period, 1916, Canadian Northern was acquired by Cunard. By 1919, she had reverted to Cunard and was used in Liverpool - New York service, as well as Southampton - New York . Scrapped 1922. Textual references are:Merchant Fleets/Cunard Line by Duncan Haws, 1987 isbn 0 946378 08 8; Great Passenger Ships of the World, Vol. I, Arnold Kludas, 1972 isbn 0 85059 174 0 - [Posted to The ShipsList by Paul Edwards - 21 September 1998]

The "Royal George" was an 11,146 gross ton ship, built by Fairfield Co Ltd, Glasgow in 1907 as the "Heliopolis" for the British owned Egyptian Mail Co. Her details were - length 525.8ft x beam 60.2ft, two funnels, two masts, triple screw and a service speed of 19 knots. There was passenger accommodation for 344-1st, 210-2nd and 560-3rd class. Launched on 28th May 1907 she was used on the Marseilles - Alexandria service, but was found to be unprofitable and was laid up in Marseilles in 1909 and offered for sale. In 1910 she was purchased by Canadian Northern Steamships of Toronto and renamed "Royal George". Refitted for North Atlantic service, she commenced Avonmouth - Quebec - Montreal sailings on 26th May 1910. On 6th Nov.1912 she stranded near Quebec, was refloated and sailed for Halifax for further repairs on 12th Dec. and then proceeded to Liverpool. She resumed Avonmouth - Quebec - Montreal voyages on 17th Jun.1913. On 3rd Oct.1914 she sailed from Gaspe Bay for Plymouth with part of the Canadian Expeditionary Force and was then taken over as a British troopship. The fleet was purchased by Cunard SS Co in 1916, but the "Royal George" continued trooping for the rest of the war. She resumed passenger voyages on 10th Feb.1919 when she started the first of five Liverpool - Halifax - New York sailings and started her first Southampton - Halifax - New York voyage on 15th Aug.1919. Her ninth and last voyage on this service commenced 10th Jun.1920 and she was then used as an emigrant depot ship at Cherbourg. In 1922 she was scrapped at Wilmhelmshaven. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.4,p.1433] There is an excellent article written by Capt.F.J.Thompson who commanded the "Royal George" from 1911 and through part of the Great War, including the Gallipoli landings; in Sea Breezes magazine, Oct.- Nov.1960 (vol.30, Nos. 178-179). It describes the day to day life of the ship, both as a passenger vessel and as a troopship. - [E-mail from Ted Finch - 22 September 1998]


ROYAL TAR
Prior to joining P & O, 'Royal Tar' was a steamship belonging to the City of Dublin Steam Packet Company of London, the agents being Willcox and Anderson. It was chartered by the Spanish government for the repatriation of the British Legion, sailing to San Sebastian and arriving 10 July 1835. Once there it was renamed "Regna Governadora". Information would be appreciated on the use of this vessel by the Spanish Government. How many voyages were made while under charter and between which ports did it ply. - [Posted to The ShipsList by Vic Major - 31 May 1998]

The "Royal Tar" was a 308 burthen ton ship, built by John Duffus, Aberdeen in 1832. Her details were - length 50.29m (165ft) x beam 8.43m (27.7ft) x depth 1.98m (6.5ft), one funnel, two masts (rigged for sail), clipper stem, side paddle propulsion and wooden hulled. She had a speed of 8 knots. After being chartered to Spain, she was transferred to P&O ownership in 1840 and continued on the Southampton - Peninsular - Gibraltar run. In 1847 she was sold to the Portuguese government and was used as a troopship. I have no further info on this vessel. "Royal Tar" was the nickname of King William IV who had served in the Royal Navy. - [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 4 June 1998]


RUAHINE
See ANTONIO LOPEZ.


RUAPEHU (1)
The "Ruapehu" was built by John Elder & Co, Glasgow for the New Zealand Shipping Co and was launched on 19/11/1883. She was a 4,262 gross ton ship, length 389ft x beam 46ft, clipper stem, one funnel, three masts (rigged for sail), single screw and a speed of 12 knots. There was accommodation for 80-1st, 80-2nd and 250-3rd class passengers. Her first voyage started on 10/1/1884 when she left London for Cape Town, Auckland and Wellington. Her last sailing on this route started on 15/9/1898 and she was then chartered to the Beaver Line. Commenced the first of two sailings from Liverpool to Quebec and Montreal on 15/4/1899 and on 14th October 1899 she was purchased by British India Steam Nav.Co and renamed "Zayathla". Put onto the Bengal service until 24th August 1900, when she was chartered to the Maharajah of Gwalior for use as a Boer War Hospital ship. She was converted at Calcutta and renamed "Gwalior" and served also to China during the Boxer Rebellion. In 1902 she returned to BISN Co, but retained the name of "Gwalior". In June 1911 she was sold, and arrived in Italy for breaking up on November 4th. [Merchant Fleets, vol.11, British India S.N.Co by Duncan Haws][North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P. Bonsor, vol.3, p.976] [North Star to Southern Cross by John M.Maber] - [E-mail from Ted Finch - 28 May 1998]


RUAPEHU (2)
The "Ruapehu" and her sister ship "Rimutaka" were both built by Wm Denny, Dumbarton for the New Zealand Shipping Co. The "Ruapehu" was a 7,705 gross ton ship, launched in 1901, twin screw with a speed of 14 knots. There was accommodation for 40-1st, 50-2nd and 250-3rd class passengers. (Approx.170 of the 3rd class passengers were berthed in temporary quarters in the cargo 'tween decks.) Although advertised to make her maiden New Zealand voyage in 1901, she did not enter her owners service until December of that year, having first been chartered by the Allan Line for their Canadian trade under the temporary name of "Australasian". She commenced her first sailing for NZSCo. on 5/12/1901 when she left London for Capetown, Auckland and Wellington. She continued on this route until 1921 when she commenced London - Panama - Auckland - Wellington sailings. She commenced her final voyage on 20/12/1930 and was scrapped in Italy the following year. [North Star to Southern Cross by John M.Maber] [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 13 January 1998]


RUDOLF
See GOTHIA.


RUGIA (1)
The "Rugia" was built in 1882 by A.G.Vulcan, Stettin for the Hamburg America Line and was the first ocean going passenger vessel built in Germany. She was a 3,467 gross ton ship, length 351.7ft x beam 42.9ft, one funnel, three masts (rigged for sails), single screw and a speed of 12 knots. There was accommodation for 96-1st and 1,100-2nd class passengers. Launched on 29/7/1882, she sailed on her maiden voyage from Hamburg to Havre and New York on 22/11/1882. She commenced her last voyage on this route on 29/7/1894 and was transferred to the Naples - New York service on 8/9/1894. Her second and last voyage on this run commenced 27/10/1894 and she was then taken in part payment by Harland & Wolff Shipbuilders for the "Pennsylvania" The "Rugia" was sold to the Fabre Line of France and renamed "Patria". She was rebuilt to 4,053 tons and on 28/11/1895 commenced sailings from Marseilles to Naples and New York. On 17/2/1903 she commenced sailing under the Italian flag on the same route and commenced her last voyage on 23/4/1905 when she left Marseilles for New York. In Dec.1905 she was sold and scrapped the following year at Marseilles. [ North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.1,p.393] [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 14 December 1997]

The steamship RUGIA was built for the Hamburg-America Line by AG Vulcan, Stettin (ship #114), and was launched on 29 July 1882. 3,467 tons; 107,19 x 13,07 meters (length x breadth); straight stem, 1 funnel, 3 masts; steel construction, single screw propulsion, compound engines, service speed 12 knots; accommodation for 96 passengers in 1st class and 1,100 in steerage; crew of 90. The RUGIA was the first transatlantic passenger steamship built in Germany. 22 November 1882, maiden voyage, Hamburg-Havre-New York. 29 July 1894, last voyage, Hamburg-Havre-New York. 8 September-27 October 1894, two roundtrip voyages, Naples-New York. 1895, given to Harland & Wolff, Belfast, in part payment for the PENNSYLVANIA; sold to the Fabre Line, and renamed PATRIA; 4,035 tons. 28 November 1895, first voyage, Marseilles-Naples-New York. February 1903, transferred to S.I.T.M.A.R. 23 April 1905, last voyage, Marseilles-New York. December 1905, sold. 1906, scrapped at Marseilles [Arnold Kludas and Herbert Bischoff, Die Schiffe der Hamburg-Amerika Linie, Bd. 1: 1847-1906 (Herford: Koehler, 1979), pp. 40-41 (photograph); Duncan Haws, Merchant Fleets in Profile, 4: The Ships of the Hamburg America, Adler and Carr Lines (Cambridge: Patrick Stephens, c1980), p. 41, no. 66; Noel Reginald Pixell Bonsor, North Atlantic Seaway; An Illustrated History of the Passenger Services Linking the Old World with the New (2nd ed.; Jersey, Channel Islands: Brookside Publications), vol. 1 (1975), p. 393]. - [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 15 October 1998]


RUGIA (2)
The steamship RUGIA was built by Bremer Vulkan, Vegesack (Bau-Nr. 477), for HAPAG (the Hamburg American Line), launched on 17 May 1905, and delivered on 27 August. She was the second vessel of this name owned by HAPAG. 6,598 tons; 124,8 x 16 meters/409 x 52 feet (length x breadth); 1 funnel, 2 masts; straight bow, quadruple-expansion engines, service speed 13 knots; accommodation for 130 passengers in 1st class and 824 in steerage; crew of 114. 15 September 1905, maiden voyage, Hamburg-East Asia. 13 May 1906, first voyage, Hamburg-Brazil. 25 March 1906, first voyage, Hamburg-New York (1 roundtrip voyage). 29 April 1913, last voyage, Hamburg-New York (1 roundtrip voyage). 27 January 1914, first voyage, Hamburg-Philadelphia. 14 June 1914, last voyage, Hamburg- Philadelphia (3 roundtrip voyages). 1919, surrendered to Britain. 1921, repurchased by HAPAG; passenger accommodation altered to 75 in 1st class and 66 in 3rd class. 19 August 1922, resumed Hamburg-New York (1 roundtrip voyage). 10 July 1923, stranded at Santa Rosa, Uruguay; 29 December 1923, refloated. 1924, Hamburg-West India service. 1932, Reederei Treuhand- Gesellschaft. 1933, scrapped in Hamburg [Arnold Kludas and Herbert Bischoff, Die Schiffe der Hamburg- Amerika-Linie, Bd. 1: 1847-1906 (Herford: Koehler, 1979), p. 146; Noel Reginald Pixell Bonsor, North Atlantic Seaway; An Illustrated History of the Passenger Services Linking the Old World with the New (2nd ed.; Jersey, Channel Islands: Brookside Publications), vol. 1 (1975), p. 412; Bonsor, South Atlantic Seaway; An Illustrated History of the Passenger Lines and Liners from Europe to Brazil, Uruguay and Argentina (Jersey, Channel Islands: Brookside Publications, c1983), p. 352]. [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 10 January 1998]


RUNIC
Built in 1900 by Harland & Wolff, Belfast for White Star Line's Australia service. She was a 12,482 gross ton ship, length 565ft x beam 63.3ft (172.2m x 19.3m), one funnel, four masts, twin screw and a speed of 14 knots. There was passenger accommodation for 400-cabin class. Launched on 25th Oct.1900, she sailed from Liverpool on her maiden voyage to Cape Town, Albany, Adelaide, Melbourne and Sydney on 3rd Jan.1901. She continued on the London - Australia service until starting her last voyage to Brisbane on 26th Sep.1929. Sold to Christian Salveson of Leith in May 1930, she was converted to a whale factory ship at Kiel and renamed "New Sevilla". On Sep.20th 1940 she was torpedoed and sunk west of Islay, Scotland by the German submarine U.138 with the loss of two lives.[Great Passenger Ships of the World by Arnold Kludas, vol.1] [North Star to Southern Cross by John M.Maber] - ]Posted to The ShipsList bt Ted Finch - 23 August 1998]


RUSS (1)
See LAHN.


RUSS (2)
See LATVIA.


RUSS (3)
See CORDILLERA .


RUSSIA (1)
(of 1867) See WAESLAND.


RUSSIA (2)
See LATVIA.


RUTHENIA
See LAKE CHAMPLAIN.


RYNDAM
The "Ryndam" was a 12,340 gross ton ship, built by Harland & Wolff, Belfast in 1901 for the Holland America Line. Her details were - length 550.3ft x beam 62.3ft, one funnel, two masts, twin screw and a speed of 15 knots. There was accommodation for 286-1st, 196-2nd and 1,800-3rd class passengers. Launched on 18/5/1901, she commenced her maiden voyage from Rotterdam to New York on 10/10/1901. On 18/1/1916 she was damaged by a mine in the North Sea, was repaired in Rotterdam and resumed the Rotterdam - New York service on 15/4/1916. On 21/3/1918 she was requisitioned by the US government for transport services, released in Oct.1919 and resumed the Rotterdam - New York service on 31/7/1920. In May 1925 she was refitted to carry cabin and 3rd class passengers, and in May 1926 altered to cabin, tourist and 3rd class. She commenced her last Rotterdam - New York voyage on 16/4/1929 and was scrapped the same year at Hendrik Ido Ambacht. Although the name was spelt as "Ryndam" by the builders, it should have been "Rijndam" and although this was never amended, it was spelt this way in large white letters on the ship's side during the Great War for identification purposes. [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 14 December 1997]


S

SAALE
The "Saale" was built in 1886 by Fairfield & Co. of Glasgow for Norddeutscher Lloyd (North German Lloyd). Her dimensions were:- length 439.6ft x beam 48.1ft, 4967 gross tons, two funnels, four masts, single screw and a speed of 17 knots. Accommodation was provided for 150-1st, 90-2nd and 1,000-3rd class passengers. She was launched on 21.4.1886 and left Bremen on her maiden voyage to Southampton and New York on 18.8.1886. In 1896-7 she was refitted and her masts reduced to two. On 30.6.1900 she was severely damaged by fire in New York harbour with the loss of 109 lives. She was then sold to a US company, re-engined and rebuilt with one funnel, renamed "J.L.Luckenbath", and used as a cargo vessel. In 1921` she was renamed "Princess", and in 1923 named "Madison" still under the US flag. She was scrapped in Italy in 1924.[North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor] [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Ted Finch - 10 August & 5 October 1997]


SAINT ANDREW
St. Andrew ( 1861) Allen Line ( British) Built by Barclay , Curle and Company. Glasgow, Scotland Tonnage was 1,432. Dimensions 253'x34'. Single screw , 10 knots, inverted type engines . Three mast and 1 funnel.Clipper bow. Iron hull. Maiden voyage : Glasgow-Quebec-Montreal, sept. 28th, 1861.Lengthened to 322 feet ( 2, 256 tons) in 1874. Re-engined with compunds. Renamed WALDENSIAN ( 1874) Scrapped in 1903. Sister ship : St. George. [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Ted Finch]


SAINT DAVID
See PHOENICIAN.


SAINT HELENA
The ship "St. Helena", listed in Lloyd's Register for 1853 through 1862. The "St. Helena", 811 tons, was built in New Brunswick in 1852, belonged to Curry & Co., and was registered in Belfast. For her measurements, check the database of Canadian-built sailing vessels over 500 tons maintained by the Maritime Museum of the Great Lakes, Kingston, Ontario, Canada, at http://www.marmus.ca:

Maritime Museum of the Great Lakes, Kingston, Ontario, Canada, Wallace Ship List, http://www.MarMus.ca/wallacelst/bwship1.htm:

Vessel Name : ST. HELENA
Rigging : SHIP[2136]
Tonnage : 847
Length : 152.60
Breadth : 35
Depth : 19
Date Built : 1852[66]
Location Built : ST. JOHN[547]
Province Built : NEW BRUNSWICK[1269]
Country Built : CANADA[1872]
Notes/Remarks : Owned Belfast, 1866.[3]
Data Source : Frederick W. Wallace - Record of Canadian Shipping 1786-1920
.[Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 13 June 1997]


SAINT JAMES
The ST. JAMES was a 3-masted, square-rigged ship, built by Webb & Allen in New York, and launched in 1835. 641 tons; 113 feet 9 inches x 32 feet 8 inches x 20 feet 5 inches (length x beam x depth of hold). Like the WELLINGTON, she was also employed in the Red Swallowtail Line of New York-London packets, serving from 1835 to 1848, during which time her westbound voyages averaged 36 days, her shortest voyage being 26 days, her longest 46 days. In 1848, she was sold to parties in Boston, and on 20 November of that year was wrecked on the Irish coast [Robert Greenhalgh Albion, Square-riggers on Schedule; The New York Sailing Packets to England, France, and the Cotton Ports (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1938), pp. 282-283]. [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 28 November 1997]


SAINT LAURENT (1)
The "Saint Laurent" was a 3,413 gross ton ship, built by Chantier de Penhoet (under supervision of Scott & Co), St Nazaire, (engines by Schneider, Creuzot). Her details were - length 355ft x beam 44ft, straight stem, two funnels, three masts(rigged for sail), iron construction, single screw and a speed of 12 knots. Launched on 19/4/1866 for Compagnie Generale Transatlantique (French Line), she sailed from Havre on her maiden voyage to Brest and New York on 11/10/1866. Between 1875-76 she was fitted with compound engines and on 10/7/1886 commenced her last Havre - New York voyage. On 22/9/1886 she started Havre - Panama sailings and between 1887-88 was re-engined and rebuilt to 3,945 tons. She was scrapped at Genoa in 1902. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P. Bonsor, vol.2, p.653] - [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 21 April 1998]


SAINT LAURENT (2)
The "Saint Laurent" was the second ship of that name owned by Compagnie Generale Transatlantique (French Line). Built by Chantiers de Normandie, Grand Quevilly in 1905, she was a 5,607 gross ton ship, length 392.2ft x beam 50.6ft, one funnel, two masts, single screw and a speed of 12 knots. There was accommodation for 25-2nd and 700-3rd class passengers. Launched on 19/5/1905, she commenced her first Havre - New York voyage on 10/2/1906 and her 37th and last sailing on this service started on 3/1/1914. On 5/2/1917 she caught fire in Malta harbour when loaded with explosives, and was sunk by torpedo to avoid an explosion. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.2,p.659] - [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 20 July 1998]


SAINT LAWRENCE
The St. Lawrence, old wooden sailing ships of the Allan Line, built in 1852 had a capacity of 578 tons. - [E-Mail from Marj Kohli - 10 Mar 1998]


SAINT LOUIS (1)
The "St Louis" was built by R. Clover & Co, Birkenhead (engines by J. Jack & Co, Liverpool) for the Dominion Line of Liverpool. She was a 1,827 gross ton ship, length 301.3ft x beam 35ft, straight stem, one funnel, two masts (rigged for sail), iron construction, single screw and a speed of 10 knots. There was accommodation for 50-cabin and 500-3rd class passengers. Launched on 31st Jul.1870, she sailed from Liverpool on her maiden voyage to New Orleans on 6th Oct.1870. On 12th Jun.1872 she started a single round voyage between Liverpool, Quebec and Montreal and on 12th May 1877 commenced her first Liverpool - Halifax - Philadelphia sailing. Her third and last voyage on this service started 22nd Aug.1877 and in 1882 she was sold and fitted with compound engines. In 1889 she was again sold, this time to Singapore owners and renamed "Cheang Chew". [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P. Bonsor, vol.2, p.803] - [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 13 October 1998]

The 1887-88 Lloyd's Register of Shipping: shows: ST. LOUIS. Call sign: JSNP. Official registration #: 63304. Master: Captain Baker, appointed to the ship in 1883. Rigging: iron single screw steam Brigantine; 1 deck and spar deck; 4 cemented bulkheads. Tonnage: 1,862 tons gross, 1,164 under deck and 1,213 net. Dimensions: 301.3 feet long, 35 foot beam and 17.4 feet deep. Built: 1870 by G.R. Clover & Co. in Birkenhead. Propulsion: compound inverted engine with 2 cylinders of 32 & 65 inches diameter respectively; stroke 36 inches; operating at 100 p.s.i.; 180 horsepower; engine compounded and new boilers installed in 1883; engine built by C.D. Holmes & Co. in Hull. Owners: G. T. Baker. Port of registry: Cardiff. - [Posted to The ShipsList by Gilbert Provost - 13 October 1998]


SAINT LOUIS (2)
The "St. Louis" was an 11,629 gross ton ship, built by W.Cramp & Sons, Philadelphia in 1894 for the American Line. Her sister ship was the "St. Paul". Her details were - length 535.5ft x beam 63ft, straight stem, two funnels, two masts, twin screw and a speed of 19 knots. There was accommodation for 350-1st, 220-2nd and 800-3rd class passengers. Launched on 12/11/1894, she sailed from New York on her maiden voyage to Southampton on 5/6/1895. She started her last Southampton - New York crossing on 16/4/1898 before being used as an auxiliary cruiser for use in the Spanish-American war. On 12/10/1898 she resumed New York - Southampton sailings and in 1903 was fitted with new boilers and had her funnels heightened. In 1913 she was refitted to carry 2nd and 3rd class passengers only and on 15/7/1914 sailed on her last Southampton - Cherbourg - Queenstown - New York voyage. Transferred to the New York - Liverpool service on 31/7/1914 until April 1918 when she commenced her last Liverpool - New York crossing, she then became the US government ship "Louisville". On 9/1/1920 she was damaged by fire while being refitted for the New York - Southampton service, and was sold as an exhibition ship but not used as such. On 20/5/1924 she left New York under tow for Genoa where she was scrapped. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P. Bonsor, vol.3, p.943] - [Posted to TheShipsList by Ted Finch - 28 January 1998]


SAINT NICHOLAS
The packet ship ST NICHOLAS, of New York, Bragdon, master, arrived at New York on 13 April 1852, from Havre on 18 March, with merchandise, 2 cabin and 337 steerage passengers; there had been 1 birth and 1 death among the passengers during the passage. The ST NICHOLAS was built in 1841 in New York by Westervelt & Mackey. 797 tons; 148 ft x 34 ft 6 in x 21 ft 5 in (length x beam x depth of hold). The ST NICHOLAS sailed in John J. Boyd and Edward Hincken's Second Line of packets between New York and Le Havre from 1841 to 1859, during which time her westward passages averaged 38 days, her shortest being 23 days, her longest 63. She is said to have burned at New York in 1859, following an explosion, but this is a mistake for the Mississippi steamship of the same name, which exploded and sank at New Orleans in June of that year: the packet ship ST NICHOLAS continued to sail between New York and Havre until at least the outbreak of the Civil War [Robert Greenhalgh Albion, Square-riggers on Schedule; The New York Sailing Packets to England, France, and the Cotton Ports (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1938), pp. 226, 286-287]. - [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 3 August 1998]


SAINT OLAF
The "St Olaf" was a 1,935 gross ton ship, built by Wigham Richardson & Co, Walker-on-Tyne (engines by North Eastern Marine Co, Sunderland) in 1871 for the Norse American Line. Her details were - length 293.9ft x beam 35.2ft, one funnel, two masts (rigged for sail), iron construction, single screw and a speed of 10 knots. There was passenger accommodation for 30-1st and 500-3rd class. Launched in April 1871, she sailed from Bergen on her maiden voyage to New York on 7/7/1871. She continued on this service until starting her last voyage on 17/5/1875. Little is known about this ship after this, but she was sold in 1880 and eventually scrapped in 1903 at Genoa. [North Atlantic Seaway, vol.2, p.777 by N.R.P. Bonsor] - [Posted to the ShipsList by Ted Finch - 1 July 1998]


SAINT PAUL
The "St Paul" together with her sister ship "St Louis" were the first American built screw express steamers. She was a steel vessel built in 1895 by W.Cramp & Sons of Philadelphia for the American Line. Her dimensions were 11,629 gross tons, length 535.5ft x beam 63ft, two funnels, two masts, twin screw and a speed of 19 knots. There was accommodation for 350-1st class, 220-2nd and 800-3rd class passengers. She was launched on 10.04.1895 and left New York on her maiden voyage to Southampton on 09.10.1895. In 1896 the funnels were heightened. In 1898 she was used as an auxiliary cruiser in the Spanish - American war and in Oct. of the same year resumed the NY - Southampton service. On 25.4.1908 collision in Solent with British cruiser "Gladiator," which sunk 0n27.4.1908. . On 25.7.1914 she made her last voyage from Southampton - Cherbourg - Queenstown [Cobh] - New York and was transferred to the NY - Liverpool service and stayed on this run until April 1918. . In 1913 she was refitted to carry 2nd and 3rd class passengers. On 25.4.1918 she capsized at the dock in New York. She was salvaged and then became the US Government ship "Knoxville". Her first postwar voyage as the "St. Paul" (New York - Plymouth - Cherbourg - Southampton) with 516 cabin and 500 third class passengers). Her final voyage was 2.9.1922 Hamburg - new York. In September 1923 she was towed from New york to Germany, where she was scrapped . [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Ted Finch 11 August 1997 - corrected by Lou Alfano 30 January 1998]


SAINT PETERSBURG
See THURINGIA.


SALERNO
See LINCOLN CITY
See CHICAGO (2).


SALIER
Steamship SALIER, built in 1874 by Earle's Shipbuilding & Engineering Co., Hull, England, for Norddeutscher Lloyd (North German Lloyd). 3,083 tons; 107,59 metres long x 11,91 metres broad; straight bow, 1 funnel, 2 masts; iron construction, screw propulsion, service speed 12 knots; accommodation for 142 first- and 800 3rd-class passengers. 15 June 1874, launched; 14 July 1875, trials held. 8 September 1875, maiden voyage, Bremen-Southampton-New York (3 roundtrip voyages). 1 April 1876, first voyage, Bremen-South America service. 10 February 1880, last voyage, Bremen-So uth America Service; returned to Bremen-New York service. 1890-1891, triple-expansion engines by Vulkan. 10 December 1895, resumed Bremen-South America service. 7 December 1896, wrecked on the north coast of Spain with the loss of her entire complement of passengers and crew (279 people) [Noel Reginald Pixell Bonsor, North Atlantic Seaway; An Illustrated History of the Passenger Services Linking the Old World with the New (Prescott, Lancashire: T. Stephenson & Sons., 1955), p 185; Bonsor, South Atlantic Seaway; An illustrated history of the passenger lines and liners from Europe to Brazil, Uruguay and Argentina (Jersey, Channel Islands: Brookside Publications, 1983), pp. 235 and 240]. Pictured in Michael J. Anuta, Ships of Our Ancestors (Menominee, MI: Ships of Our Ancestors, 1983; reprint Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., [1993]), p. 292, courtesy of the Peabody Essex Museum, East India Square, Salem, MA 01970 [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 19 July 1997]


SAMARIA
Built in 1920 by Cammel Laird & Co, Birkenhead for the Cunard SS Co, she was a 19,602 gross ton ship, overall length 624ft x beam 73.7ft, one funnel, two masts, twin screw and a service speed of 16 knots. There was capacity for 350-1st, 350-2nd and 1,500-3rd class passengers. Launched on 27/11/1920, she sailed from Liverpool on her maiden voyage to Cobh and Boston on 19/4/1922. On 2/11/1922 she commenced her first Liverpool - Cobh - Boston - New York voyage. Her accommodation was reclassified to cabin, tourist and 3rd class in April 1929, and on 16/12/1939 she sailed from Liverpool for New York but was forced to return to port after a collision with an escorting warship. On 6th January 1941 she sailed from Liverpool to Suez as a troop ship, and in September 1948 commenced her first voyage from Cuxhaven to Havre and Quebec. She sailed between Cuxhaven and Quebec or Halifax until April 1950 when she instituted London - Quebec sailings. In the autumn of 1950 she was refitted to carry 250-1st and 650-tourist class passengers and on 14/6/1951 sailed Liverpool - Quebec - Southampton. Her first Southampton - Havre - Quebec voyage started 12/7/1951 and her last Quebec - Havre - Southampton crossing commenced 23/11/1955. In January 1956 she was scrapped at Inverkeithing. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P. Bonsor, vol.1, p.163] - [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 25 July 1998]


SAMSHEE
The vessel was a standard W.W. Two Liberty Ship built by Bethleham-Fairfield Yard, Baltimore, Md. USA Hull Number 2338 March, 1944, As S.S. Samshee, Registered under British Flag . Loaned to Britain on lease lend terms.This is one of 200 vessels turned over to the British Ministry of Transport. Returned to the U.S. aand Scrapped in New Orleans, La. August 1964 441-06 feet x 57 feet x 27-09 feet. [Posted to The ShipsList by Capt. C.J. Carroll - 20 March 1998]


SAMUEL GRIFFIN
The Samuel Griffin was a Second World War Liberty Ship that was named afer a soldier,who was afterwards a Congressman from the State of Virginia 1789-1795. This ship was built by Todd Houston Shipbuilding Corporation in Houston, Texas. Year built August 1942 Scrapped in Baltimore, Md. November 1961 Hull No. 10. Gross Tons 7176. Net tons 4380. Displacement 14,245 Lightship 3401 tons. Length 441 feet 6 inches. Breadth 56 feet 10 3/4 inches. Hull: Steel. Depth moulded 37 feet 4 inches. Draft at class.. 27 feet 8 7/8 inches. Horsepower 2500 at 76 rpm. Speed 11.0 knots. Propellers, one. NOTE: After the war many Liberty Ships brought GIs home from Europe. They slept in what was the U.S.Armed Guard Quarters. Which had room for 25-30 persons. However, there where some Liberty ships that were fitted out to carry approximately 500 troops or POW`s. I have no info on what Steamship Co. operated this vessel for the WSA. And I couldn`t tell you where to find any records on her various voyages. - [Posted to The ShipsList by Captain C.J.Carroll - 26 June 1998]


SAMUEL ROBERTSON
The SAMUEL ROBERTSON was a three-masted, square-rigged ship, built in 1825, in New York, by the famous shipbuilder Christian Bergh. 421 tons; 113 ft 8 in x 28 ft 10 in x 14 ft 5 in (length x beam x depth of hold). She was a transient trader from 1825 until 1834 (in 1831, Augustus H. Griswold, master, she sailed in the Crassous & Boyd New York-London "packet" line), when she became part of the Black X line of New York- London Packets. At only 421 tons, she was too small a vessel for packet service, and in 1835 she became a whaler, sailing first out of New Bedford, then out of Fairhaven, Massachusetts. She was the first ship from New Bedford district to Hurd's Island, in the Desolation Islands district of the South Pacific. Her 3rd mate and three crewmen were drowned while chasing whales in 1857. She was withdrawn from the whaling fleet in 1859, and spent four years as a transient trader. She was condemned at Pernambuco in 1863 [Robert Greenhalgh Albion, Square-riggers on Schedule; The New York Sailing Packets to England, France, and the Cotton Ports (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1938), pp. 280-281 and 301; Carl C. Cutler, Queens of the Western Ocean; The Story of America's Mail and Passenger Sailing Lines (Annapolis: United States Naval Institute, c1961), p. 391]. See Stuart C. Sherman, Whaling logbooks and journals, 1613-1927 : an inventory of manuscript records in public collections, revised and edited for publication by Judith M. Downey and Virginia M. Adams (New York: Garland, 1986), pp. 316-317.[Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer -23 October 1997]


SANDEFJORD
See COPERNICUS.


SAN FERNANDO
See URANIUM.


SAN GIORGIO
The "San Giorgio" of 1910 was a 6392 gross ton vessel, built by Sir J. Laing & Sons Ltd, Sunderland in 1907 for the Italian company Sicula Americana. Her details were - length 406ft x beam 51.7ft, two funnels, two masts, twin screw and a speed of 14 knots. There was accommodation for 30-1st, 60-2nd and 1,800-3rd class passengers. Launched on 10/4/1907, she left Naples on her maiden voyage to Messina, Palermo and New York on 19/7/1907. In 1912 her first class accommodation was converted to 2nd class and in August 1917 she went to Transoceanica. On 8/7/1921 she commenced her last voyage from Naples to New York and in August of that year, went to Navigazione Generale Italiana. She was renamed "Napoli" in 1921 and finally scrapped in 1926.[North Atlantic Seaway, by N.R.P.Bonsor. vol.3. p.1375] [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Ted Finch - 4 October 1997]


SAN GIOVANNI
The "San Giovanni" was built in 1907 by Sir J.Laing & Sons Ltd, Sunderland for the Italian company Sicula Americana. She was a 6,592 gross ton ship, length 430ft x beam 52.7ft, two funnels, two masts, twin screw and a speed of 14 knots. There was accommodation for 30-1st, 60-2nd and 1,800-3rd class passengers. Launched on 27/6/1907, she sailed from Naples on her maiden voyage to Messina, Palermo and New York on 14/10/1907. In 1912 she was refitted to carry 1st and 2nd class only and on 4/10/1912 started her first Genoa - Buenos Aires voyage. She made occasional S.America sailings during the autumn and winter months. In August 1917, the company was absorbed into the Transoceanica Societa Italiana di Navigazione. On 11/8/1921, the "San Giovanni" started her last Naples - New York crossing and then came under the ownership of Navigazione Generale Italiana, who renamed her "Palermo". She commenced her first voyage from Naples to Palermo and New York on 13/10/1921 and her second and last voyage on this service on 30/11/1921. She was scrapped in 1928. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.3,p.1375] - [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 24 February 1998]


SANGOLA
The "Sangola" was one of a class of seven mainly cargo ships built for British India Steam Navigation Co. Built by Wm Denny & Bros, Dumbarton in 1901, she was a 5,149 gross ton ship, length 410.8ft x beam 50.7ft x depth 32ft (125,21m x 15,45m x 9,75m). She had one funnel, two masts, single screw and a speed of 10.5 knots. There was accommodation for 6-1st class passengers and she carried a crew of 94. Launched on 18th June 1901, she was delivered to BISNCo on August 16th. In September 1914 she trooped between India and Marseilles and was sold to Japanese owners in June 1923. Renamed "Goshu Maru" by Fukuhara Kisen, Dairen she served this company until 1933 when she was scrapped in Japan. [Merchant Fleets, vol.11, British India S.N.Co, by Duncan Haws] - [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 1 July 1998]


SAN GIUSTO
See FURST BISMARCK.


SAN GOTTARDO
The "San Gottardo" was built by G.Ansaldo & Co, Sampierdarena in 1884 for Dufour & Bruzzo, Genoa. She was a 2,532 gross ton ship, length 344.5ft x beam 38.1ft, one funnel, two masts, single screw and a speed of 10 knots. There was passenger accommodation for 30-1st and 1,290-3rd class. Launched in May 1884, she started her maiden voyage on 20/5/1884 when she left Genoa for Brazil and Argentina. In 1886 she was chartered by the Italian government for the Abyssinian campaign. In 1889 she was chartered by La Veloce of Genoa and in 1897 chartered by Ligure Brasiliana. She then passed back to her original owners and on 18/4/1903 started her first voyage from Genoa to Naples, Azores and New York. On 5/10/1903 she started her second crossing when she sailed from Genoa for Naples, Palermo and New York, and on 18/4/1904 commenced her third and final voyage on this service. On her last two crossings, only a comparatively small proportion of her available accommodation was taken up and the service was abandoned. Later the same year, the ship was sold to Japanese owners and renamed "Kabafuto Maru" and was eventually scrapped in 1933. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.3,p.1322]] - [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 18 Feb 1998]


SAN IGNACIO DE LOYOLA >
See MINNESOTA (1),


SAN MARCOS
See SCHIEDAM.


SAN ROSSORE
See IL PIEMONTE.


SANSONE
See SWITZERLAND.


SANTA MARGHARITA
MARINULA.


SANTIGO
See BYRON.


SANTA LUCIA
See CANADA (2).


SANTIAGO
See WEIMAR.


SAO JORGE
See SARDINIA.


SARAH
See ELBE (1) .


SARAH BOTSFORD
According to Lloyd's Register, the bark SARAH BOTSFORD, 306/297 tons (old/new measurement) was built in New Brunswick in 1840. She was originally owned by McBrayn, registered in Glasgow, and employed in the Glasgow-Canada trade. The 1849 edition of the Register (prepared in 1848) gives her master as McDowell; the 1850 edition gives the following: master, D. Cameron; owner, Kidston & Co; port of registry, Glasgow; port of survey, Clydeside; intended destination, Pictou. The vessel last appears in the Register for 1854; [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer]


SARDEGNA (of 1935)
See SIERRA VENTANA (2) .


SARDINIA
The "Sardinia" was built by Blohm & Voss, Hamburg in 1898 as a general trader for the Hamburg America Line. She was a 3,601 gross ton ship, length 345ft x beam 43.5ft, one funnel, two masts, single screw and a speed of 11 knots. Her sister ship was the "Syria". This was primarily a cargo vessel but made a single passenger voyage between Hamburg and New York (arr 25/5/1905) with 629-3rd class passengers, and then returned to general trading. In 1916 she was seized by Portugal at Horta, Azores and renamed "Sao Jorge" and in 1925 was sold to Cia de Nav.Colonial and renamed "Amboin". She was eventually scrapped at Rotterdam in 1933. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.5,p.1813.] [Merchant Fleets in Profile by Duncan Haws, vol.4, Hamburg America Line.] [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 2 January 1998]


SARDINIAN
The "Sardinian" was built by R.Steele & Co, Greenock in 1874 for the Allan Line. She was a 4,399 gross ton ship, length 400ft x beam 42.3ft, straight stem, one funnel, three masts, iron construction, single screw and a speed of 13 knots. There was passenger accommodation for 120-1st and 850-3rd class. Launched on 3/6/1874, she sailed from Liverpool on her maiden voyage to Quebec and Montreal on 29/7/1875. On 10/5/1878 she had an explosion in her bunkers at Moville, Ireland, followed by a fire. She was scuttled to extinguish the fire but subsequently refloated and repaired and resumed sailings between Liverpool, Quebec and Montreal on 27/6/1878. In 1897 she was fitted with triple expansion engines by Wm.Denny, Dumbarton and one of her masts removed and on 19/6/1897 commenced her first voyage from Glasgow to Quebec and Montreal. On 16/12/1897 she started her first Glasgow - New York sailing and commenced her last voyage on this route on 20/12/1902. She started sailings between London - Quebec and Montreal, with 2nd and 3rd class passengers only on 20/5/1905 and on 31/7/1912 commenced Glasgow - Liverpool - Philadelphia sailings. Between 27/5/1914 and 7/12/1914 she ran between Glasgow and Boston and in 1917 went to Canadian Pacific Ocean Services together with the rest of the Allan Line fleet. On 20/9/1918 she commenced her first voyage for her new owners when she left London for Quebec and Montreal and on 24/11/1918 made her first voyage after the Armistice, from Glasgow to St John NB with cargo only. She commenced sailings between Avonmouth - Quebec and Montreal on 17/5/1919 and started her last voyage from Avonmouth to St John NB on 21/12/1919. She was sold on 8/12/1920 and became a hulk at Vigo. On 22/6/1938 she was towed to Bilbao and scrapped. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol. 1, p.314] [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 9 January 1998]

The Sardinian of the Allan Line - Joseph E. Dutton was Captain in the 1870s and was called "Holy Joe" by his crew. Built in 1875, this ship appears on October 5, 1875 at Quebec, which may have been her maiden voyage. The Sardinian would continue to be used on the Atlantic runs but was scraped in 1920. In May of 1878 the Sardinian exploded on entering the harbour at Derry, Ireland. They finished their voyage onboard the Peruvian. On May 14, 1878 the following letter appeared in the Times: "Captain Grills, of the Liverpool Mercantile Marine Service Association, going to Derry upon a pleasure trip, was upon the bridge of the Sardinian when the accident occurred, and speaks in high terms of the discipline of officers and crew under the trying circumstances. He says: - I was on the bridge with Captain Dutton, looking for the approach of the tender, when in a moment an explosion occurred down in the forehold, where a quantity of coal was stored, and blew into the air thousands of fragments of wood. Immediately afterwards people came shrieking up the companion ways, many of them cut, bruised, and blackened. The scene was indescribable. A great deal of confusion was caused by the separation of children from parents and husbands from wives. One poor woman begged me to go and find her baby, which was torn from her arms. The Captain, on hearing the explosion and seeing the smoke, sprang from the bridge, ordered the hose to be instantly applied, and by dint of extraordinary exertions on the part of himself, the officers, and crew, succeeded in saving several people who were in the midst of the debris. The hold was flooded with water from the hose, but the smoke continued to pour out in dense volumes, and ultimately they had to abandon all hope of saving the ship except by opening the sluices and letting the water in. Before doing this the vessel was taken into five fathoms of water, so that when she settled down her decks would be above water, and she might the more easily be pumped out and raised. While the orders were being executed, the whole of the saloon passengers, assisted by many of the crew, were engaged in transferring the emigrants to the mail tender which had just come alongside. About 300 or 400 soon crowded her decks, and she landed them at Moville pier, after which she returned for orders. Subsequently the second tender took off most of the saloon passengers, many wounded, and a large quantity of baggage. The boats were lowered in order to save the baggage. The mail tender returned and took the rest of the people, and I went with them, and we reached Derry about nine o'clock that night. I cannot refrain from referring to the heroic conduct of one lady, a saloon passenger, who, while partially dressed, rescued a baby that was fearfully burnt, at considerable risk to herself; the mother had proceeded to Derry, thinking she had lost her child for ever. The promptitude and energy displayed by Captain Dutton was in every way admirable, and his orders were executed with great decision. Miss Macpherson and her little band of Canadian emigrants showed no small amount of true fortitude and heroism. Most of the children behaved nobly under the trying circumstances, and exhibited much of the fruit of their careful training. They kept repeating to one another many of the sayings they had heard from Miss Macpherson about being patient, and brave, and good. I visited the infirmary before leaving on Saturday, and spoke to each of the nine patients, who are all suffering seriously, but I am hopeful of the recovery of some." - [E-Mail from Marj Kohli - 10 Mar 1998]


SARDINIAN PRINCE
See REGINA D'ITALIA.


SARMATIAN
The "Sarmatian" was built by R.Steele & Co of Greenock, Scotland in 1871 for the Allan Line. She was a 3647 gross ton vessel, length 370.9ft x beam 42.2ft, one funnel, three masts, iron construction, single screw and a speed of 13 knots. She had accommodation for 100-1st, and 850-3rd class passengers. Launched on 7/3/1871, she sailed from Liverpool on her maiden voyage to Quebec and Montreal on 31/8/1871. In 1874 she was chartered as a troopship for the Ashanti Expedition and on 3/1/1889 commenced her last voyage from Liverpool to Halifax and Portland. On 21/6/1889 she transferred to the Glasgow - Quebec - Montreal service until 1903. [In 1900 her passenger accommodation was altered to 2nd and 3rd class only.] On 3/6/1903 she commenced running from Glasgow to Boston and on 22/4/1904 commenced the London - Quebec - Montreal run. On 20/7/1907 she left Boston on her last voyage to Glasgow and in 1908 was scrapped at Rotterdam. [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Ted Finch - 12 September 1997]

The Sarmatian, of the Allan Line, built in 1871, was large and very comfortable. The Sarmatian appears October 22, 1871 carrying emigrants to Canada and this may have been her maiden voyage. She was removed from service in 1908. - [E-Mail from Marj Kohli - 10 Mar 1998]

Allan Line - years of service 1874-1908 - built at Clyde, Steele shipyard. 3650 tons, 371 x 42 ft. 1 funnel, 3 masts twin engines, 13 knots troop carrying during Ashanti War 1874. original accomodation 120 saloon, later had 200 first, 75 second, 850 steerage. ref; Gibbs, Passenger.Liners of the Western Ocean. "...the earliest straight-stemmed Allan steamer, began a much improved series." [Posted to The ShipsList by Paul Petersen - 18 March 1998]

I also have a document published by the Allan Line in 1880s and it states: "The Sarmatian, a favourite steamer of the Line, was the vessel selected for conveyance of H.R.H. Princess Louise and the Marquis of Lorne to Canada, in November, 1878, on His Excellency assuming the post of Governor General of Canada." --it goes on about that and then -- "The sleeping apartment of the Marchioness of Lorne is fitted up most elegantly in the French style, and her sitting-room, immediately adjoining, is a perfect model of refinement and exquisite tast, the panels being richly upholstered in crimson satin. A heating apparatus has been fitted up between the two apartments, and there is a bath-room immediately adjoining." [Posted to The ShipsList by Marj Kohli - 19 Mar 1998]


SARTELLE
I know relatively little about the SARTELLE, as there is no reference to her in the standard work on 19th-century American sailing vessels, William Armstrong Fairburn's Merchant Sail (6 vols.; Center Lovell, ME: Fairburn Marine Educational Foundation, [1945-55]). From the sources readily available to me here, however, I do know that she was a 3-masted, square-rigged ship of 416 tons, built in Medford, Massachusetts, in 1840, and first registered at the port of New York on 13 January 1847 (I suspect that prior to that time she was registered at Boston). In 1845, Solomon Taylor, master, she was advertised as sailing in the Dispatch Line of Boston-New Orleans packets, and in the New Line of New York-New Orleans packets, and in 1854, prior to her voyage from Antwerp to New York, she was advertised as sailing in the Nelson Line of New York-New Orleans packets [Forrest R. Holdcamper, comp., List of American-flag Merchant Vessels that received Certificates of Enrollment or Registry at the Port of New York, 1789-1867 (Record Groups 41 and 36), National Archives Publication 68-10, Special Lists 22 (Washington, DC: National Archives and Records Service, 1968), p. 631; Carl C. Cutler, Queens of the Western Ocean; The Story of America's Mail and Passenger Sailing Lines (Annapolis: United States Naval Institute, c1961), pp. 452, 501, and 502]. I know nothing of her subsequent history or ultimate fate. - [E-mail from Michael Palmer - March 1, 1998]

Apparently the ship was later (1855) rigged as a bark and ultimately was abandoned at sea in 1862. She did not appear to have been strictly an emigrant vessel, as she traded with South America, the East Indies, Singapore, Australia and the like on other occasions. - [E-mail from Gary W. Kaucher - 11 March 1998]


SASSARI
See CUBA .


SATURNIA (1)
The Saturnia was built in 1910 for the Donaldson Line, and was primarily engaged in the Glasgow-Canada service. In 1921, however, it appears to have made at least one voyage to New York on behalf of the Cunard Line, which was the virtual owner of the Donaldson Line, having since 1912 held the whole of the ordinery share capital of the Anchor Line, which in turn, in 1916, had obtained a controlling interest in the Donaldson Line's passenger steamers. [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 2 July 1997]


SATURNIA (2)
The "Saturnia" of 1922 was built by C.Connell & Co, Glasgow in 1910 for the Donaldson Line of Glasgow. She was an 8,611 gross ton ship, length 456.3ft x beam 55.3ft, one funnel, two masts, twin screw and a speed of 14 knots. There was accommodation for 250-2nd and 950-3rd class passengers. Launched on 29/3/1910, she sailed on her maiden voyage from Glasgow for Quebec and Montreal on 11/6/1910. In Aug.1911, she collided with an iceberg near Belle Isle but completed her homeward voyage. Her last voyage commenced on 12/3/1925 when she left Glasgow for Portland. She was laid up until 1928 when she was sold, and broken up in Italy the following year. There was a later (1927-1940) Italian liner with the same name. [Posted to the ShipsList by Ted Finch - 1 November 1997]


SAXOL
See LAKE ERIE.


SAXON
See ANGLO-SAXON.


SAXONIA (1)
The SAXONIA was built by Caird & Co, Greenock, Scotland, for the Hamburg American Line, and launched on 21 August 1857. 2,684 tons; 95 x 13 meters (311.7 x 42.6 feet, length x beam); clipper bow, 1 funnel, 3 masts; iron construction, screw propulsion, service speed 10 knots; passenger accommodation: 60 1st-, 120 2nd-, and 450 steerage-class. 1857, chartered by the British government as an Indian Mutiny transport. 1 April 1858, first voyage, Hamburg-Southampton-New York. 1871, compound engines by Reiherstieg, Hamburg. 5 October 1873, last voyage, Hamburg-New York (subsequently ran Hamburg-West Indies). 1879, became NIJNI NOVGOROD (Russian Volunteer Fleet). 1895, scrapped [Noel Reginald Pixell Bonsor, North Atlantic Seaway; An Illustrated History of the Passenger Services Linking the Old World with the New (2nd ed.; Jersey, Channel Islands: Brookside Publications), vol. 1 (1975), p. 388. Pictured in Michael J. Anuta, Ships of Our Ancestors (Menominee, MI: Ships of Our Ancestors, 1983), p. 300, courtesy of the Peabody Essex Museum, East India Square, Salem, MA 01970. For additional information on the SAXONIA, including pictures, see Arnold Kludas and Herbert Bischoff, Die Schiffe der Hamburg-Amerika- Linie, Bd. 1: 1847-1916 (Herford: Koehler, 1979). [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 17 November 1997]

The "Saxonia" was built by Caird & Co, Greenock in 1857 and was the first of three ships of this name owned by the Hamburg America Line. She was rigged for sail. She was one of six sister ships, the others being "Hammonia", "Borussia", "Austria", "Bavaria" and "Teutonia". [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 18 November 1997]


SAXONIA (2)
The "Saxonia" was built for the Cunard Line in 1899 by John Brown & Co. Ltd of Glasgow. She was a 14,281 gross ton vessel, length 580ft x beam 64.2ft, one funnel (the tallest funnel ever fitted to a steamer), four masts, twin screw and a speed of 15 knots. Accommodation for 164-1st, 200-2nd and 1,600-3rd class passengers. She sailed on her maiden voyage from Liverpool - Queenstown (Cobh) - Boston, on 22.5.1900. and stayed on this service until 1909, when she was transferred to the Trieste - Fiume - Naples - New York service for two voyages and then resumed the Liverpool - Queenstown - Boston run. In 1910 she was again transferred to the Trieste - NY service and in 1911 went onto the Liverpool - Queenstown - NY service. 1912 resumed Trieste - NY until 8.7.1914 when she made her last trip Trieste - Fiume - Patras - Messina - Naples - Lisbon - NY. On 29.8.1914 she sailed from Liverpool to NY and then on to Quebec where she became a Canadian troop transport. 1914 - 1915 was used as a prisoner of war ship in London. On 1.3.1917 resumed London - NY for three voyages and in September returned to Liverpool - NY run. In 1920 she was refitted to carry 471 cabin class and 978-3rd class passengers and the funnel was shortened by 15ft. In 1924 she made her last voyage from London - Hamburg - Southampton - Cherbourg - NY and in scrapped in March 1925. [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Ted Finch - 10 August 1997]


SAXONIA (3)
See CARMANIA (2).


SCANDINAVIA
The "Scandinavia" was an iron vessel built by Earle's Shipbuilding Co. of Hull in 1865 as the "Sirius" for the White Star Line. She was built as a 620 ton ship of 203ft x 26 ft and with two masts. In 1866 she was sold foreign and renamed "Columbia" and in 1868 was bought by the British "Anchor Line" and named "Scandinavia". Originally used as a North Sea feeder vessel, she was rebuilt and lengthened in 1872 to a 1137 ton vessel, length 258.2ft x beam 26.1ft, clipper stem, one funnel, three masts, single screw and a speed of 9 knots. She completed one voyage on the Glasgow - Liverpool - Halifax - St John NB service and was then re-engined and transferred in 1876 to the Glasgow - Naples - Messina - Palermo - New York - Glasgow service, she made the odd voyage between Bordeaux - NY but was mainly used on the Mediterranean service. In 1888 she became the Furness Line's "Columbia" again, in 1891 resold to a British company and renamed "Sirius". In 1894 she became the US owned "Kahului" and in 1897 became the US owned "Cleveland". On 24.10.1900. she was wrecked at Cape Rodney, Alaska. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, Vol.1, p.458][Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Ted Finch - 28 July 1997]


SCANDINAVIAN (1)
See TASSO (1).


SCANDINAVIAN (2)
The "Scandinavian"was built by R.Steele & Co, Greenock in 1869 for the Allan Line.She was a 2,840 gross ton ship, length 338.7ft x beam 40ft, clipper stem, one funnel, three masts, iron construction, single screw and a speed of 11 knots. There was accommodation for 100-1st and 600-3rd class passengers. Launched on 8/11/1869, she sailed on her maiden voyage from Liverpool to Quebec and Montreal on 5/5/1870. On 16/3/1876 she commenced her last voyage from Liverpool to Portland and was then laid up until 1879 when she was fitted with compound engines. On 26/8/1879 she sailed from Liverpool to St.John's, NF, Halifax and Baltimore and on 28/4/1880 started sailings between Glasgow, Quebec and Montreal. On 19/11/1885 she commenced running between Glasgow and Philadelphia and on 14/2/1899 commenced her last voyage Glasgow - Boston. Later the same year she was scrapped in Italy.[North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.1, p.313][Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 22 October 1997]


SCANDINAVIAN (3)
Allan Line had two vessels called "Scandinavian" but as you mention the early years of this century, I assume you want the second one as the first was scrapped in 1899.

The second vessel was launched in 1903 as the "New England" for Dominion Line in 1898, became the "Romanic" for White Star Line in 1903, became "Scandinavian" for Allan Line in 1912 and scrapped in 1923. [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Ted Finch - 1 August 1997]


SCHIEDAM
The "Schiedam" was built by A.McMillan & Son, Dumbarton, Scotland (engines by J&J Thomson, Glasgow) in 1874 as the "San Marcos" for the Liverpool & Texas SS Co. She was a 2,236 gross ton ship, length 301ft x beam 39.3ft, straight stem, one funnel, two masts, iron construction, single screw and a speed of 10 knots. In 1877 she was chartered to the Holland America Line, renamed "Schiedam", and started her first Rotterdam - New York voyage on 6/10/1877. In 1880 she was purchased by Holland America Line and on 13/5/1882 commenced Amsterdam - New York sailings. She started her last voyage on this service on 9/12/1888, and was then transferred to the South American service. On 25/4/1891 she resumed Rotterdam - New York voyages and on 22/7/1893 resumed Amsterdam - New York voyages. She started her last Amsterdam - New York voyage on 11/6/1897 and was sold to the Italian company, Cosulich the same year. They renamed her "Miramar" and operated her until 1903 when she was scrapped at Genoa. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P. Bonsor, vol.3, p.909] - [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 17 April 1998]


SCHILLER (1)
The SCHILLER (I) was a 3-masted, square-rigged ship, built by Johann Lange, Vegesack/Grohn, for D. H. Watjen & Co, and launched on 9 July 1842. 227 Commerzlasten; 35,0 x 9,0 x 5,7 meters (length x beam x depth of hold). Under captains Hans Peter Gabriel Johannsen and Claus Bahr, both from Vegesack, the SCHILLER served in the North Atlantic trade, carrying emigrants to North America and returning with cargoes of tobacco and wool. In 1861, the SCHILLER was sold for 13,250 taler to J. Ekman & Co, of Goteborg, Sweden, and renamed PENELOPE (511 tons register). Her captains under Swedish registry were, in turn, N. O. F. Thulin, J. Moolbach, T. Overgaard, and Andersen. In November 1874, the PENELOPE, bound from Bjorneborg to Cartagena with a cargo of wood, was found floating, abandoned, in the North Sea; she was taken to Blaavand, Denmark, and condemned. No trace of the crew was ever found; in all probability, they abandoned her on the assumption that she would sink, and in the effort to save themselves were drowned [Pawlik, op. cit, p. 204]. No picture of the SCHILLER, later PENELOPE, is known to survive. [Posted to the Emigrtion-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 12 December 1997]


SCHILLER (2)
The Bremen bark SCHILLER was built by William Waller of the shipbuilding firm of D. Oltmann W[it]we, in Motzen, on the Weser River, for the Bremen firm of D. H. Watjen & Co (the second of three vessels of this name to belong to the company), and was launched on 21 August 1861. 265 Commerzlasten/590 tons register; 42,7 x 9,6 x 5,1 meters (length x beam x depth of hold). Like the first SCHILLER, she was engaged primarily in the transport of emigrants to the United States, returning with a cargo of either tobacco or cotton. Her captains were Claus Bahr, from Vegesack (who had been the last master of the first SCHILLER), Windeler Wischhusen, from Mittelsburen, and H. Gloistein. In 1878, the SCHILLER was sold to the shipbuilding firm of H. F. Ulrichs, in Vegesack; as Ulrichs had just built a new, iron bark, also named SCHILLER, for Watjen, this sale most probably represented at least partial payment for the new vessel. The new master was H. Fettjuch. In 1883, the SCHILLER was sold to W. Maack, of Rostock, and Jacob Zeplien, of Wustrow; the new master was Albert Zeplien. On 5 October 1889, the SCHILLER, bound from Savannah for Buenos Aires with a cargo of wood, was severely damaged, and on 8 October 1889, entered the harbor at St. George, in the Bermuda Islands, where on 10 February 1890, she was condemned and dismantled [Peter-Michael Pawlik, Von der Weser in die Welt; Die Geschichte der Segelschiffe von Weser und Lesum und ihrer Bauwerften 1770 bis 1893, Schriften des Deutschen Schiffahrtsmuseums, Bd. 33 (Hamburg: Kabel, c1993), p. 456]. [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 10 December 1997]


SCHILLER (3)
The "Schiller" was built by R.Napier & Sons, Glasgow for the Adler Line of Hamburg. She was a 3,421 gross ton vessel, length 380.5ft x beam 40.1ft, two funnels, two masts, iron construction, single screw and a speed of 13 knots. There was accommodation for 90-1st, 100-2nd and 800-3rd class passengers. Launched on 26/8/1873, she sailed from Hamburg on her maiden voyage to New York on 5/2/1874. On 27/4/1875 she sailed on her 8th eastbound voyage from New York for Plymouth, Cherbourg and Hamburg, but on 7th May, she ran aground on the Retarrier Reef, Scilly Isles in dense fog and a heavy swell. She had aboard 59-1st, 75-2nd and 120-3rd class passengers as well as her crew of 101. The heavy seas broke her up with the loss of 312 of the 355 aboard. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.3, p.952] [Merchant Fleets in Profile by Duncan Haws, vol.4, Hamburg America Line.] There is a photograph of this ship in North Atlantic Seaway, vol.3,p.951. [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 28 October 1997]

As an addendum to what Ted Finch posted about the Schiller, I thought perhaps you'd like a follow up of events concerning the ship. These are news items that appeared in the Illustrated London News under various dates during 1875/ 76.:
July 3, 1875: "With regard to the wreck of the Schiller, which was lost off the Scilly Islands with 331 lives, an official report has been made which attributes the diaster to the neglect of ordinary precautions"
Aug. 7, 1875: "Two kegs which divers have recovered from the wreck of the Schiller are supposed to contain together L20,000."
Aug 14, 1875: "Two more boxes, containing L20,000 worth of dollars, recovered from the wreck of the Schiller, have been landed at Penzance by the Sciily cutter."
March, 18, 1876: "The wreck of the German Mail Steamer Schiller amongst the Scilly Islands on May 7 last gave rise to a claim for salvage in the Admiralty Division on Wednesday, when the owners and crew of the pilot cutter Rapid were awarded L500, in addition to what they had already received from those who were saved from the stranded vessel."
April 8, 1876: " A sum of L10,000 has been removed from the wreck of the Schiiler, which was lost upon the rocks of Scilly last year."
Sounds like a case of creative lighthouse work with all that bullion on abroad, but then I'm naturally a suspicious guy. Especially on nights with dense fog and heavy swells. - [Posted to The ShipsList by Louis de Furia - 16 April 1998]


SCHLESWIG
See VANCOUVER ISLAND.


SCHOMBERG
The "Schomberg" was built by Alexander Hall of Aberdeen in 1875. She was a 2284 tons register ship, overall length 288ft x beam 45ft. Captain Forbes, as commodore of the Black Ball Line was shifted into her from the "Lightning", and it was hoped that she would break the record to Australia. She sailed from Liverpool on 6th October 1855 and Forbes boasted that he would reach Australia in 60 days. However she encountered light and moderate winds and her best day's run was 368 miles. She sighted Cape Bridgewater on Christmas day and on 27th December, after two days tacking, and the wind blowing fresh from ahead, she went about at noon when 4 miles offshore and tacked out. At 6 pm he tacked in again and at about 10.30 pm, the land being faintly visible, the wind died away. Forbes was playing cards in the saloon when the mate reported that the ship was drifting close to the land and suggested going about. Forbes was losing at cards and being in a bad temper, insisted on playing another hand before tacking ship, and the danger point had been passed when he came on deck at 11.30 and gave the order to about ship. As there was hardly any wind, the ship refused to come about and the ship grounded on a sandbank 35 miles West of Cape Otway. When Forbes was told that she was hard aground he is reported to have said "Let her go to hell" and immediately went below. Henry Keen, the mate then took charge, clewed up the sails, dropped the anchor and lowered the boats. It was mainly due to the Mate and a first class passenger, that all passengers were safely disembarked and put aboard the steamer "Queen" the following morning. All efforts to save the ship failed and she eventually broke up. Forbes was aquitted of blame at the enquiry as the sandbank was uncharted, but at a mass meeting of the passengers he was severely censured and some went so far as to suggest that he was so disgusted at the slowness of the passage that he let the ship go ashore on purpose. He never obtained command of another Black Ball ship and sank into obscurity; staying in Australia for a while. He obtained command of the "Hastings" in 1857 but lost her in 1859 and for a while was 'on the beach' in Calcutta. He reappeared in Scotland in 1862 acting as agent for the owners of the "Earl of Derby" and in 1864 was in Hong Kong in command of the "General Wyndham". He was described then as 'a seedy broken-down looking skipper'. He commanded this ship until 1866 and that was the end of his sea going career. He died at the early age of 52 on 4th June 1874 in Liverpool and his tombstone is in Smithdown Road Cemetary. [The Colonial Clippers by Basil Lubbock] - [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 23 July 1998]


SCIENCE
The ship Science was built in 1827 in Newberry Ma. as a Whaler and sailed out of Portland Me. . She was converted to a Bark in 1841. The last record of her was Apr.29th 1850. - [Posted to The ShipsList by Bob Dyer - 3 March 1998]


SCOT
See OCEANA.


SCOTIA
Built by C. Connell & Co, Glasgow (engines by J.& J. Thomson, Glasgow) in 1890 as the "Grimm" for the Hansa Line. Her dimensions were - 2,558 gross tons, length 320ft x beam 40.1ft, straight stem, one funnel, two masts, single screw and a speed of 11 knots. There was accommodation for 10-1st and 550-3rd class passengers. Launched on 20th May 1890, she sailed from Hamburg on her maiden voyage to Montreal on 19th Jul.1890. Her last voyage on this service started on 8th Oct.1891 and in March 1892 she was purchased by the Hamburg America Line. She commenced Hamburg - Montreal sailings for her new owners on 20th May 1892 and in 1895 was renamed "Scotia". Her first sailing under this name started 27th Apr.1895 when she left Hamburg for Montreal and on 20th Nov.1895 she commenced her first Hamburg - Baltimore voyage. On 10th Nov.1898 she was chartered to the Red Star Line and started the first of two Antwerp - New York voyages and commenced Genoa - Naples - New York sailings for Hamburg America Line on 3rd Apr.1901. Her tenth and last voyage on this route started on 19th Oct.1902 and 1910 she was sold to Emil R. Retzlaff, Stettin. Surrendered to Britain in 1919, she was sold to W. Schuchman in 1922 and renamed "Nordsee". In 1924 she was purchased by Belgian owners and renamed "Denise" and was scrapped in Italy in 1926. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P. Bonsor, vol.1, p.399] - [Merchant Fleets by Duncan Haws, vol.4, Hamburg America Line] - [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 31 August 1998]


SCOTIAN (1)
See PRESIDENT LINCOLN (1) .


SCOTIAN (2)
See STATENDAM (1).


SCOTSTOUN
See CALEDONIA (2) .


SCUTARI
See LAPLAND (1)


SCYILLA
See MINNIE J. DICKS.


SCYTHIA
The "Scythia" was a 4,557 gross ton ship, built by J.& G.Thomson, Glasgow in 1874 for the British & North American Royal Mail Steam Packet Co (Cunard Line). Her details were - length 420.8ft x beam 42.2ft, straight stem, one funnel, three masts (rigged for sail), iron construction, single screw and a speed of 13 knots. There was accommodation for 300-1st and 1,100-3rd class passengers. Launched on 28th Oct.1874, she sailed from Liverpool on her maiden voyage to Queenstown (Cobh) and New York on 1st May 1875. On 9th July 1884 she commenced her first Liverpool - Queenstown - Boston sailing and subsequent sailings were mostly on this route. Her last voyage started on 20th Sep.1898 when she left Liverpool for Queenstown and New York and she was scrapped in Italy the following year. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P. Bonsor, vol.1, p.152] - [Posted to The Shipslist by Ted Finch - 25 August 1998]


SEA LARK
The SEA LARK was a ship-rigged reputed clipper, 973 tons, built in Trescott, Maine, in 1852, and owned by Samuel G. Reed of Boston and E. Mott Robinson of New Bedford, owners of most probably the largest number of clippers operating under the American flag. In 1854 and early 1855, Jacob T. Woodbury, master, she was advertised in the S Line of New York-Antwerp packets; later in 1855, Charles Adams, master, she was also advertised in Tapscott's Line of New York-Liverpool packets. She was sunk by the CSS ALABAMA on 3 May 1863, although where and under what circumstances I have been unable to determine [William Armstrong Fairburn, Merchant Sail (Center Lovell, ME: Fairburn Marine Educational Foundation, [1945-55]), V.3105 and 3554, VI.3869; Carl C. Cutler, Queens of the Western Ocean; The Story of America's Mail and Passenger Sailing Lines (Annapolis: United States Naval Institute, c1961), pp. 388 and 398] For further information, contact the Peabody Essex Museum, East India Square, Salem, MA 01970,or The Mariners' Museum, 100 Museum Dr., Newport News, VA 23606-3798 [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 14 August 1997]


SEA GIRT
See SOUTHERN CROSS.


SEDGWICK
See CITY OF CHESTER .


SELAMET
See KANGAROO.


SEMPIONE
See ETNA.


SENATOR IKEN
The SENATOR IKEN was a 3-masted, square-rigged ship, built by the shipwright Johann Lange in Vegesack/Grohn for the Bremen firm of J. W. F. Iken & Co, and launched on 18 July 1860. International Signal Code: QBPJ. The SENATOR IKEN was one of the largest wooden sailing vessels built by Lange: 571 Commerzlasten/1,247 tons; 53,8 x 11,4 x 6,7 meters (length x beam x depth of hold). In 1862, the SENATOR IKEN was owned by the Bremen firm of E. Iken & Co. In 1863, the vessel was sold for 7,000 Taler to Seidenburg, Wendt & Co, Bremen (1/4), who also acted as managers, Warncken & Sohn (1/4), Hermann Georg Rodewald (1/8), and the current master of the ship, Nicolaus Dannemann (1/8). Masters of the SENATOR IKEN while she sailed under the Bremen flag were, in turn, Daniel Beenken, Carl Heinrich Werner Schierenbeck, Nicolaus Dannemann, and from 1867, Berend Schumacher. An account of life for the crew on board the SENATOR IKEN under Captain Dannemann is contained in the letters of Paul Mewes, who served as an apprentice seaman aboard the vessel in 1863 and 1864; these letters are now deposited in the Schiffahrtsmuseum in Rostock, and have been published in Paul Mewes, Grusst alle, n"achstens mehr; Briefe und Zeichnungen des Segelschiffsmatrosen Paul Mewes 1860-1865, ed. I. Schmidt (Rostock: Hinstorff, 1981). In December 1865, the SENATOR IKEN, Dannemann, master, arrived at New York from Hamburg after a very stormy passage, during which 8 children were born and 18 passengers died. In 1879, the SENATOR IKEN was re-rigged as a bark, and in 1893 she was sold to D. Heinrichs, of Bremerhaven. On 31 December 1895, the SENATOR IKEN, Th. Henke, master, bound from Philadelphia for Marseilles with a cargo of Petroleum, was towed, leaky, into Ponta Delagada, in the Azores, where she was condemned as irreparable [Peter-Michael Pawlik, Von der Weser in die Welt; Die Geschichte der Segelschiffe von Weser und Lesum und ihrer Bauwerften 1770 bis 1893, Schriften des Deutschen Schiffahrtsmuseums, Bd. 33 (Hamburg: Kabel, c1993), pp. 235-236]. Despite her 35-year career, no picture of the SENATOR IKEN appears to survive. - [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 27 August 1998]


SERAVALLE
See WESER (2) .


SEVEN SEAS
The "Seven Seas" was built by Sun Shipbuilding & Drydock Co, Chester, Pa. in 1940 as the "Mormacmail" for the US Moore McCormack Line as a freighter. She was a 12,575 gross ton ship, length overall 492ft x beam 69.2ft, one funnel, one mast, single screw and a speed of 16 knots. Launched on 15/1/1940, she went to the US Navy in 1941 and was renamed "Long Island". In April 1947 she was laid up and in 1948 was sold to the Caribbean Land & Shipping Co, renamed "Nelly" and rebuilt as a passenger ship with accommodation for 20-1st class and 1,066-tourist class. In 1949 she made her first Bremen - Australia voyage and in 1953 was renamed "Seven Seas". In 1955 she was chartered to the German Europe-Canada Line and on 30/4/1955 commenced her first Bremen - Havre - Southampton - Quebec - Montreal voyage. In Jan 1956 she made her first Bremen - Rotterdam - Havre - Southampton - Halifax - New York voyage (winter service) and in April 1956 resumed Bremen - Quebec - Montreal voyages. She was bought outright by Europe-Canada Line in 1956 and in April 1963 made her last Bremen - Rotterdam - Havre - Southampton - Quebec - Montreal voyage and subsequently ran to New York. On 17/7/1965 she had a serious fire in the engine room while 500 miles from St John's NF to which port she was towed. She was repaired and on 20/6/1966 resumed the New York - Southampton - Havre - Rotterdam - Bremen service, starting her last voyage on 13/9/1966. She was bought by Rotterdam University the same year and employed as a students' hostel. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.4,p.1738] - [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 9 January 1998]


SEYDLITZ
The "Seydlitz" was built by F.Schichau, Danzig in 1903 for North German Lloyd of Bremen. She was a 7,942 gross ton ship, length 450.1ft x beam 55.5ft, one funnel, two masts, twin screw and a speed of 14 knots. There was accommodation for 101-1st, 105-2nd and 1,700-3rd class passengers. Launched on 25/10/1902, she sailed from Bremen on her maiden voyage to the Far East via Suez on 5/8/1903. She made six round voyages on this service and on 22/2/1905 started her first Bremen - Suez - Australia voyage, and made 18 round voyages on this route. Her first Bremen - New York crossing commenced on 31/3/1906 and on 15/3/1913 she started a single round voyage between Bremen and South America. On 3/10/1913 she commenced a single Bremen - Philadelphia voyage. She commenced her eighth and last N.Atlantic sailing on 25/4/1914 when she left Bremen for New York and on 3/6/1914 started her last Bremen - Australia sailing. She left Sydney on 3/8/1914 and took refuge at Bahia Blanca, Argentina for the duration of the Great War. After the Armistice, she was retained by NGL, refitted to carry cabin and 3rd class passengers and on 12/11/1921 resumed Bremen - S.America sailings. On 11/2/1922 she resumed Bremen - New York voyages and in May 1928 was altered to carry cabin, tourist third cabin, and 3rd class passengers. In March 1930 she made her last Bremen - Halifax - New York - Bremen voyage and on 27/6/1931 commenced her last crossing from Galveston to Bremen. She was scrapped at Bremerhaven in 1933. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.2 ,p.567] - [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 16 April 1998]

The steamship SEYDLITZ was built by F. Schichau, Danzig (ship #259), for Norddeutscher Lloyd, and launched on 25 December 1902. 7,942 tons; 143.15 x 16,88 meters (length x breadth); 1 funnel, 2 masts; twin-screw propulsion, triple-expansion engines, service speed 14.5 knots; accommodation for 101 passengers in 1st class, 115 in 2nd class, 134 in 3rd class, and 1,700 in steerage; crew of 155 to 190. 5 August 1903, maiden voyage, Bremen-Suez Canal-Far East (6 roundtrip voyages). 22 February 1905, first of a total of 18 roundtrip voyages, Bremen-Suez Canal-Australia. 1906, rebuilt at Newcastle-on-Tyne, as the German yard were too busy. 31 March 1906, first of 7 (pre-World War I) roundtrip voyages, Bremen-New York. 15 March 1913, single roundtrip voyage, Bremen-South America. 3 October 1913, single roundtrip voyage, Bremen-Philadelphia. 25 April 1914, last pre-War voyage, Bremen-New York. 3 June 1914, last voyage Bremen-Australia. 3 August 1914, fled Sydney for Valparaiso, Chile; acted as support vessel for the Graf Spee Squadron for the Battle of Coronel and the Battle of the Falklands. 18 December 1914, took refuge at San Antonio Este, Argentina. 1917, the crew damaged her engines to prevent her seizure and charter to the Allies by Argentina; the crew then repaired the engines and on 17 July 1917 sailed from Bahia Blanca, via Montevideo 24 July, via St. Vincent 15 August, for Bremen. Retained by Norddeutscher Lloyd after the Armistice. 12 November 1921, resumed Bremen-South America service (1 roundtrip voyage); 254 passengers in cabin class, 612 in 3rd class. 11 February 1922, resumed Bremen-New York service. 7 September 1927, last voyage, Bremen-New York. March 1930, last voyage, Bremen-Halifax-New York (arrived 12 April)-Bremen. 27 June 1931, last Atlantic Conference voyage, Bremen-Canada-Galveston. 1933, scrapped at Bremerhaven [Edwin Drechsel, Norddeutscher Lloyd Bremen, 1857-1970; History, Fleet, Ship Mails (Vancouver: Cordillera Pub. Co., c1994-c1995), vol. 1, p. 292, no. 188 (photograph); Noel Reginald Pixell Bonsor, North Atlantic Seaway; An Illustrated History of the Passenger Services Linking the Old World with the New (2nd ed.; Jersey, Channel Islands: Brookside Publications), vol. 2 (1978), p. 567]. Also pictured in Michael J. Anuta, Ships of Our Ancestors (Menominee, MI: Ships of Our Ancestors, 1983), p. 307, courtesy of the Peabody Essex Museum, East India Square, Salem, MA 01970. - [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 17 April 1998]


SHACKAMAXON
The United States Ship "Shackamaxon" (Capt. West) sailed with almost 700 passengers from Liverpool, England on 4 Oct 1852, arriving Adelaide, South Australia on 19 Jan 1853. Approx 10% of the passengers (mostly children) died en route from Scarlet Fever. After her arrival in Australia a closed-door enquiry was held into the competence of the Surgeon-superintendent (Dr. Edward D. Allison). It appears that the results were never published, but it sounds like a whitewash. The press of the day has lots of info. and I am fascinated to ascertain what the outcome was. However, that is another story.
The "Shackamaxon" was described as a frigate-like vessel of approx. 1200 tons (various tonnages ranging from 1119 to 2500 quoted by different sources) belonging to the Port of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. She was launched on 10 July 1851 and went to sea on 2 August. Length 175 feet overall, 37 feet 6 inches beam. Height between decks 7 feet 3 inches. Sounds like a magnificent vessel. On 7 Feb 1853 an auction of her fittings was advertised, so it sounds like she may not have made further runs as an immigrant ship. But she was obviously very new at the time. There is also reference to a change in the English law about that time regarding the conditions under which immigrants could be carried, and that was given as a possible reason she left Liverpool hurriedly with a number of passengers who were already sick/dying. - [Posred to The ShipsList by Maurice Bath - 5 April 1998]


SHAKESPEARE
The SHAK[E]SPE[A]R[E] was a 3-masted, square-rigged ship, built by G.Thomas, Quincy, Massachusetts, and launched in 1856. 1183 tons (821 Commerzlasten), 180 x 35 x 22 feet (length x beam x depth of hold). On 4February 1856, she was purchased by the Bremen firm of D. H. Watjen & Co, to whom she belonged until 1878, when she was sold to Louis Kalkmann, who employed her in the transportation of petroleum from the United States to Europe. She was abandoned in the North Atlantic in December 1889, during a hurricane [Lloyd's Register of Shipping, annual volumes for 1876/77- 1881/82; Otto Hover, Von der Galiot zum Funfmaster; Unsere Segelschiffe in der Weltschiffahrt 1780-1930 (Bremen: Angelsachsen-Verlag, 1934), pp. 277 and 322; Rolf Reinemuch,Segler aus Downeast;Die unerschrockenen Manner von der Weser und ihre prachtigen Schiffe aus Neu-England(Herford: Koehlers Verlagsgesellschaft, c1971), pp. 40 and 138; Johannes Lachs, Schiffe aus Bremen; Bilder und Modelle im Focke-Museum (Bremen: H. M. Hauschild, [1994]), p. 139, plate 112]. Lachs's work contains a color reproduction of an oil painting of the SHAKESPEARE, by J. & F. Tudgay and dated 1864, in the Focke-Museum in Bremen. - [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 28 September 1998]


.SHAWMUT
See CONTINENTAL.


SHIKOTAN MARU
See BATAVIA.


SHINSEI MARU
See REGINA ELENA.


SHINZAN MARU
See MONMOUTH.


SHUNA
See LAPLAND (1) .


SIBAJAK
The "Sibajak" was a 12,040 gross ton ship, built in 1927 by "De Schelde", Vlissingen for the East Indies service of Rotterdam Lloyd of Rotterdam. Her details were - length 161.5m x beam 19.1m (530ft x 62.7ft), one funnel, two masts, twin screw and a speed of 17 knots. There was accommodation for 527 passengers in three classes and she carried a crew of 209. Launched on 2nd April 1927, she commenced her maiden voyage from Rotterdam to Batavia on 8th february 1928. In 1935 she was modernised and rebuilt to 12,226 tons and in 1940 was re-registered in Willemstad, Curacao and converted to a troop ship under the management of P&O Lines. In 1950 she made her first voyage as an emigrant ship between Rotterdam, Melbourne and Sydney and in 1951 returned to the Rotterdam - Indonesia service. Her first Rotterdam - Quebec voyage took place in April 1952 and her first Rotterdam - New York voyage in May 1952. Rebuilt in 1953 to 12,342 gross tons, she returned to the Rotterdam - Indonesia service in 1955 and on 25th August 1959 arrived at Hong Kong to be broken up. [Great Passenger Ships of the World by Arnold Kludas, vol.2,p.236] [North Star to Southern Cross by John M.Maber] - [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 26 July 1998]


SIBERIA
The "Siberia" was built by J&G.Thomson, Glasgow in 1867 for the British & North American Royal Mail Steam Packet Co (Cunard Line). She was a 2,498 gross ton ship, length 320ft x beam 39.2ft, clipper stem, one funnel, two masts(rigged for sail), iron construction, single screw and a speed of 12 knots. There was accommodation for 100-1st and 800-3rd class passengers. Laid down as the "Sumatra", she was launched on 2nd July 1867 as the "Siberia", and left Liverpool on her maiden voyage to Queenstown (Cobh) and New York on 24th Sep.1867. She started her last Liverpool - Queenstown - Boston - New York voyage on 7th Feb.1871 and on 21st March 1871 commenced Liverpool - Queenstown - Boston direct sailings. Her last sailing on this service started on 5th Sep.1878 and she was sold to Spanish owners in 1880. Renamed "Manila" she was wrecked at San Juan, Puerto Rico on 11th May 1882. [North Atlantic Seaway, vol.1, p.150] - {Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 20 August 1998]


SICILIAN
The "Sicilian" was built by Workman Clark & Co Ltd, Belfast in 1899 for the Allan Line. She was a 6,224 gross ton ship, length 430ft x beam 54.2ft, one funnel, two masts, single screw and a speed of 13 knots. There was accommodation for 50-1st, 150-2nd and 400-3rd class passengers. Launched on 25/8/1899, she was initially used as a transport ship to South Africa during the Boer War. On 28/2/1901 she commenced her first sailing from Liverpool to Portland and on 16/4/1901 commenced a single round voyage between Glasgow and New York. On 22/5/1901 she sailed on her first voyage from Glasgow to Philadelphia and 6/7/1901 first voyage from Glasgow to Quebec and Montreal. In 1906 she was rebuilt to carry 280-2nd and 900-3rd class passengers and in 1908 was further rebuilt to 7,328 tons. In May 1908 she made her first London - Quebec - Montreal sailing and on 27/8/1914 commenced her last peacetime sailing on this route, being used as a troopship for the Canadian Expeditionary Force on the eastbound leg of the voyage. She continued on the Liverpool or London to Canada service until 1917 when she came under the ownership of Canadian Pacific Ocean Services. On 17/12/1918 she commenced her first voyage after the Armistice, from liverpool to St John,NB and between March and June 1919 was used to repatriate Belgian refugees. From 5/7/1919 she sailed between London, Quebec and Montreal and subsequently Avonmouth, Glasgow, London or Antwerp and Canada. Her last London - St John,NB sailing commenced on 14/11/1921 and in Dec.1921 she inaugurated a St John,NB - Boston - Nassau - Havana service. On 8/8/1922 she was laid up at Portsmouth and later Southampton and in 1923 was renamed "Bruton" and used as a Canadian Pacific cargo vessel. She was scrapped in May 1925 in Italy. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.1, p.321] [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 8 December 1997]

The steamship SICILIAN was built by Workman, Clark & Co Ltd, Belfast, for the Allan Line, and launched on 25 August 1899. 6,224 tons; 131,06 x 16,52 meters/430 x 54.2 feet (length x breadth); 1 funnel, 2 masts; screw propulsion, triple-expansion engines, service speed 13 knots; accommodation for 50 passengers in 1st class, 150 in 2nd class, and 400 in steerage. The SICILIAN began her career as a Boer War transport from 1899 to 1901. 28 February 1901, first voyage, Liverpool-Portland, Maine. 16 April 1901, 1 roundtrip voyage, Glasgow-New York. 22 May 1901, first voyage, Glasgow-Philadelphia. 6 July 1901, first voyage, Glasgow-Quebec-Montreal; 1906, passenger accommodation altered to 280 in 2nd class and 900 in steerage. 1908, tonnage readmeasured at 7,328. May 1908, first voyage, London-Quebec-Montreal. Continued in London-Canada, later Liverpool-Canada, service during World War I. 1917, purchased by Canadian Pacific Ocean Services (formerly Canadian Pacific Railway Co). 17 December 1918, first voyage after the Armistice, Liverpool-St. John, New Brunswick. March-June 1919, repatriated Belgian refugees. 5 July 1919, first voyage, London-Quebec-Montreal; subsequently Avonmouth, Glasgow, London or Antwerp-Canada. 14 November 1921, last voyage, London-St. John, New Brunswick. December 1921, inaugurated St. John-Boston-Nassau-Havana service. 8 August 1922, laid up at Portsmouth; later Southampton. 1923, converted to a cargo steamer and renamed BRUTON. 8 May 1925, sold; scrapped in Italy [Noel Reginald Pixell Bonsor, North Atlantic Seaway; An Illustrated History of the Passenger Services Linking the Old World with the New (2nd ed.; Jersey, Channel Islands: Brookside Publications), vol. 1 (1975), p. 341, and vol. 2 (1978), p. 1312]. Pictured in Michael J. Anuta, Ships of Our Ancestors (Menominee, MI: Ships of Our Ancestors, 1983), p. 308, courtesy of the Peabody Essex Museum, East India Square, Salem, MA 01970. - [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 5 July 1998]


SICILIAN PRINCE
The "Sicilian Prince" was a 2784 gross ton vessel built as the "Mocambique" by Scott & Co., Greenock, Scotland for Mala Real Portugueza [Potuguese Royal Mail]. Her length was 363.5ft x beam 42.2ft, she had a clipper stem, one funnel, two masts, single screw and a speed of 12 knots. There was accommodation for 25-1st class and 1,100-3rd class passengers. In 1898 she became the Portuguese "Alvarez Cabrel" and in 1902 was sold to the Prince Line and renamed "Sicilian Prince" Launched on 28/9/1889, she sailed on her first voyage for Prince Line from Leghorn to Genoa, Naples, Palermo and New York on 30/9/1902. Her last voyage commenced 18/3/1908 between Naples, Syracuse, Piraeus, Patras, Palermo and New York when she was transferred to the British Northwest Transport Line and ran between Rotterdam, Halifax and New York. In 1910 she was sold to the Khedivial Mail Line (who were involved in the Pilgrim trade to Mecca) and renamed "Abbassieh". In 1930 she was scrapped in Italy. [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Ted Finch] A picture of the SICILIAN PRINCE can be found on page 308 of Ships of Our Ancestors by Michael J. Anuta.[E-mail note from Jim Gionfriddo - 9 October 1997]


SICILY
See RHENANIA.


SIDONIAN
The steamship SIDONIAN was built for Handyside & Henderson (popularly known as the Anchor Line) by Robert Duncan & Co, Port Glasgow (engines by Finnieston Steamship Works, Glasgow), and launched on 5 May 1870. 1,236 tons; 78,63 x 8,94 meters/258 x 32.3 feet (length x breadth); clipper bow, 1 funnel, 3 masts; iron construction, screw propulsion, inverted engines, service speed 10 knots. 6 August 1870, maiden voyage, Glasgow-Moville-New York (2 roundtrip voyages). 1870, first voyage, Glasgow-Marseilles (departed 17 November)-New York (arrived 21 December; 150 passengers)-Glasgow. 1871-1889, Glasgow-Mediterranean-New York-Glasgow service. 1872-1875, 9 roundtrip voyages, Glasgow-Liverpool-Halifax-St. John, New Brunswick. 1877, engines compounded. 1879-1880, 2 roundtrip voyages, Glasgow-Liverpool-Bombay. 21 February 1889, last voyage, Leghorn-Naples-Palermo-New York (arrived 29 March). 1889-1890, New York-West Indies. February 1893, scrapped [Noel Reginald Pixell Bonsor, North Atlantic Seaway; An Illustrated History of the Passenger Services Linking the Old World with the New (2nd ed.; Jersey, Channel Islands: Brookside Publications), vol. 1 (1975), p. 456]. - [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 27 September 1998]


SIEGFRIED
See HUNGARIA.


SIERRA NEVADA
See MADRID.


SIERRA VENTANA (1)
Built in 1913 by Bremer Vulkan, Vegesack for North German Lloyd of Bremen, this was a 8,262 gross ton ship, length 439.5ft x beam 56ft, one funnel, two masts, twin screw and a speed of 13 knots. There was accommodation for 120-1st, 80-3rd and 1,450-4th class passengers. Launched on 12/10/1912, she left Bremen on her maiden voyage to Antwerp, Montevideo and Buenos Aires on 18/1/1913. She sailed from Buenos Aires on her last voyage to Boulogne and Bremen on 7/7/1914. She arrived in Bremen shortly before the outbreak of the Great War and in 1920 was handed to the French Compagnie de Navigation Sud Atlantique, who renamed her "Alba" and used her on their Bordeaux - South America service. In 1926 she went to Compagnie des Chargeurs Reunis and was renamed "Amerique" and in 1936 was scrapped at Blyth.[South Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P. Bonsor] - [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 11 July 1998]


SIERRA VENTANA (2)
Built for North German Lloyd of Bremen by Bremer Vulkan, Vegesack in 1923 for their South American service. This was a 11,452 gross ton ship, length 490.8ft x beam 61.8ft, two funnels, two masts, twin screw and a service speed of 14 knots. There was capacity for 401-cabin class and 712-3rd class passengers. Launched on 16/5/1923, she sailed from Bremen on her maiden voyage to New York on 8/9/1923 and made her first Bremen - S.America sailing in 1924. In May 1926 she was refitted to carry cabin, tourist third cabin and 3rd class passengers, and started her last Bremen - New York voyage on 17/3/1932 (21 round voyages to NY). In 1935 she was sold to Italia and was renamed "Sardegna". In 1937 she went to Lloyd Triestino and on 29/12/1940 was torpedoed and sunk by the Greek submarine "Proteus" near Saseno, Albania. [South Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor] - [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 11 July 1998]


SIKH
See REGINA ELENA.


SILESIA
The "Silesia" was the first of two vessls with this name owned by the Hamburg America Line and was built by Caird & Co, Greenock in 1870. Her details were - 3,142 gross tons, length 339.9ft x beam 40ft, one funnel, two masts, iron construction, single screw and a speed of 12 knots. There was accommodation for 90-1st, 130-2nd and 520-3rd class passengers. Launched on 14/4/1869, she left Hamburg on her maiden voyage to Havre and New York on 23/6/1869. She commenced her last New York voyage on 24/2/1875 and was then laid up until 1877 when she was fitted with compound engines and was subsequently used on the Hamburg - West Indies service. In 1887 she was sold to H.F.Swan of Newcastle and renamed "Pacifica" and in 1888 was resold to the Italian company, Lavarello, who renamed her "Citta di Napoli". In 1891, she went to another Italian company, La Veloce, who named her "Montevideo" and on 2/12/1898 she was wrecked near the Lobos Island, River Plate. In 1899 she was refloated and broken up. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.1, p.390] [Merchant Fleets in Profile by D.Haws, vol.4, Hamburg America Line.] As you seem certain that the "Silesia" sailed to New York in 1882, it is probable that she was used mainly on the West Indies service but made one or more voyages to New York. [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 31 October 1997]

The steamship SILESIA--the first of two steamships of this name owned by the Hamburg-America Line--was built by Caird & Co, Greenock (ship #150), and launched on 14 April 1869. 3,142 tons; 103,62 x 12,26 x 10,22 meters (length x breadth x depth of hold); straight bow, 1 funnel, 2 masts; iron construction, screw propulsion (single-expansion engines), service speed 12 knots; accommodation for 90 passengers in 1st class, 120 in 2nd class, and 520 in steerage; crew of 120. Captains: 1869-1872 - H. H. D. N. I. Trautmann; 1872-1875 - C. Hebich; 1877-1880 - C. B. R. Ludwig; 1879 - H. F. Schwensen; 1880-1882 - A. Albers; 1882-1883 - C. Kordell; 1883 - H. Vogelgesang; 1883-1886 - H. Barends; 1884,1885 - W. Lubbe; 1886 - C. Kaempff; 1886 - C. Droescher; 1886-1887 - H. C. Bauer. 23 June 1869, maiden voyage, Hamburg-Havre-New York. Voyages: 1869 - New York (5 x); 1870 - New York (6 x); 1871 - New York (7 x); 1872 - New York (7 x); 1873 - New York (8 x); 1874 - New York (6 x); 1875 - New York (2 x). 24 February 1875, last voyage, Hamburg-Havre-New York. March 1875, laid up. 1877, compound engines. Voyages: 1877 - West Indies; 1878 - West Indies (5 x); 1879 - New York (7 x); 1880 - New York (6 x); 1881 - New York (8 x); 1882 - New York (8 x); 1883 - New York (6 x); 1883 - New York/Veracruz; 1884 - New York (2 x); 1884 - New York/West Indies; 1884 - West Indies; 1885 - West Indies (4 x); 1886 - West Indies (3 x); 1887 - West Indies. 1887, given to Armstrong & Mitchell, in partial payment for new vessels (COLONIA and ITALIA); sold in turn to H. F. Swan, Newcastle, and renamed PACIFICA. 1888, sold to A. Albini, Genoa, and renamed CITTA DI NAPOLI. 1889, sold to Fratelli Lavarello, Genoa. November 1889, first voyage, Genoa-South America. 1890, acquired by the La Veloce Line. 1891, renamed MONTEVIDEO. 2 December 1899, wrecked off Lobos Island, on the River Plate [Walter Kresse, ed., Seeschiffs-Verzeichnis der Hamburger Reedereien, 1824-1888, Mitteilungen aus dem Museum fur Hamburgische Geschichte, N. F., Bd. 5. (Hamburg: Museum fur Hamburgische Geschichte, 1969), vol. 1, p. 192; Arnold Kludas and Herbert Bischoff,Die Schiffe der Hamburg-Amerika-Linie, Vol. 1: 1847-1906 (Herford: Koehler, 1979), p. 28 (photograph); Noel Reginald Pixell Bonsor, North Atlantic Seaway; An Illustrated History of the Passenger Services Linking the Old World with the New (2nd ed.; Jersey, Channel Islands: Brookside Publications), vol. 1 (1975), pp. 352 (photograph) and 390; Noel Reginald Pixell Bonsor, South Atlantic Seaway; An Illustrated History of the Passenger Lines and Liners from Europe to Brazil, Uruguay and Argentina (Jersey, Channel Islands: Brookside Publications, c1983), pp. 281 and 308-309]. Also pictured in Clas Broder Hansen, Passenger liners from Germany, 1816-1990, translated from the German by Edward Force (West Chester, Pennsylvania: Schiffer Pub., c1991), p. 32 (painting in the possession of HAPAG-Lloyd AG), and in Michael J. Anuta,Ships of Our Ancestors (Menominee, MI: Ships of Our Ancestors, 1983), p. 310. - [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 22 August 1998]


SILVER LAKE (1)
SILVER LAKE NO. 1, a sternwheel packet, built at Wellsville, Ohio, in 1858. 70 tons; wood hull. Originally documented at Rock Island, Illinois. Burned on the Osage River, Missouri, 3 September 1862 [Frederick Way, Jr., Way's Packet Directory, 1848-1994; Passenger Steamboats of the Mississippi River System Since the Advent of Photography in Mid-Continent America (revised edition; Athens, Ohio: Ohio University Press, 1994) p. 426, packet #5115]. [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 16 November 1997]


SILVER LAKE (2)
SILVER LAKE NO. 2. a sternwheel packet, built at Wellsville in 1861. 129 tons; wood hull. 1861, sold to the U.S. Quartermaster's Department. 7 October 1865, sold to private hands, rig changed to side-wheel, and renamed MARION. Engines, inside diameter of cylinder 13 in, length of piston stroke 3 1/2 feet; 2 boilers. Made a mountain trip, Capt. William D. Shanks, and about August 1866, sank on a sand bar at Pablo Rapids, about 70 miles below Fort Benton. The "Wild and Scenic Rivers" supplement map to the National Geographic Magazine for July 1977 marks the location of the wreck of the MARION [Frederick Way, Jr., Way's Packet Directory, 1848-1994; Passenger Steamboats of the Mississippi River System Since the Advent of Photography in Mid-Continent America (revised edition; Athens, Ohio: Ohio University Press, 1994) pp. 426, packet #5117, and 308, packet #3757]. [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 16 November 1997]


SILVER LAKE (3)
SILVER LAKE NO. 3, a sternwheel packet, built at California, Pennsylvania, in 1862, for Capt. Henry Willoughby (3/4) and Thomas M. Rees (1/4), Pittsburgh. 212 tons; 157 x 32.5 x 4.5ft (length x beam x depth of hold); wood hull; engines, inside diameter of cylinder 15 in, length of piston stroke 5ft. Transported ordnance for the U.S. army from Pittsburgh to St. Louis. 15 November 1862, sold to the U.S. Navy; served in the war as tinclad #23. 17 August 1865, sold at public sale, in Mound City, Illinois, for $9,500, to Capt. James Ken[n]iston, of Cincinnati, who rebuilt her and renamed her MARY HEIN, after Capt. James Hein. Ran New Orleans-Shreveport. 28 February 1866, burned on the Red River, downbound with 600 bales [Frederick Way, Jr., Way's Packet Directory, 1848-1994; Passenger Steamboats of the Mississippi River System Since the Advent of Photography in Mid-Continent America (revised edition; Athens, Ohio: Ohio University Press, 1994) pp. 426, packet #5118, and 313, packet #3815]. [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 16 November 1997]


SILVER LAKE (4)
SILVER LAKE NO. 4, a sternwheel packet, built at California, Pennsylvania, in 1863, for Capt. Henry Willoughby (3/4) and Thomas M. Rees (1/4), Pittsburgh. 224 tons; 155 x 33 x 5.5 ft (length x beam x depth of hold); wood hull; engines, inside diameter of cylinder 15 in, length of piston stroke 5ft; 3 boilers, each 38 in by 22 ft. Ran Pittsburgh-St. Louis. Capt. John Todd, Wellsville, Ohio, bought an interest in March1865; also W. H. Briggs. Ran Pittsburgh-Cincinnati, with occasional trips to St. Louis, Capt. John Todd. 1 February 1871, in Pittsburgh from New Orleans, delivering a cargo of sugar and molasses. Later that year went to the Missouri River, where she was operated by Durfee & Peck, Capt. Andy Johnson, Grant Marsh and Joe Todd, pilots. 20 November 1871, frozen in above Sioux City, Iowa, below Okobogo Island and Fort Sully; Marsh, Todd, Dr. Perry, N. Buison, and L. T. Jones took to shank's mare, wagons, and sleds to return to Sioux City.Off the lists, 1879 [Frederick Way, Jr., Way's Packet Directory, 1848-1994; Passenger Steamboats of the Mississippi River System Since the Advent of Photography in Mid-Continent America (revised edition; Athens, Ohio: Ohio University Press, 1994) pp. 426-427, packet no. 5119]. [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 16 November 1997]


SIOUX CITY
The SIOUX CITY was a side-wheel packet, built in Cincinnati, Ohio, in 1857. 379 tons; 218 x 33 x 5.8 ft (length x beam x depth of hold); wood hull; engines, inside diameter of cylinder 22in, length of piston stroke 7 ft; 3 boilers, each 44 in by 24 ft. First home port, St. Louis. Operated on the Missouri River. Ran trips up the Red River in 1860, and served as a U.S. army transport in 1863-1864. 26 February 1867, lost at St. Louis when the ice gorged [ Frederick Way, Jr., Way's Packet Directory, 1848-1994; Passenger Steamboats of the Mississippi River System Since the Advent of Photography in Mid-Continent America (revised edition; Athens, Ohio: Ohio University Press, 1994) p. 428, packet #5129]. [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 16 November 1997]


SIRIO
The "Sirio" was built by Robert Napier & Sons, Glasgow in 1883 for Soc. Italiana di Trasporti Marittimi Raggio & Co. She was a 4141 gross ton vessel, length 115,81m x beam 12,83m, two funnels, three masts, iron construction, single screw and a speed of 14 knots. She carried 80-1st, 40-2nd and 1,200-3rd class passengers. Launched on 26/3/1883, she sailed on her maiden voyage from Genoa to Las Palmas, Montevideo and Buenos Aires on 15/7/1883. In 1885 she was taken over by NGI and commenced running for the new company, on the same service, on 21/3/1885. In 1891, she was fitted with triple expansion engines which increased her speed to 15 knots. On 4/8/1906, she was wrecked near Cape Palos, Spain with the loss of 442 lives. 1929. [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Ted Finch - 15 September 1997]


SIR ISAAC NEWTON
the SIR ISAAC NEWTON: bark, built by the shipbuilder J. Meyer, of Lubeck, Germany, in 1839 for the Hamburg shipowner Robert Miles Sloman, Bielbrief 25 April 1839. 149 Commerzlasten; no measurements given. Walter Kresse, ed., Seeschiffs- Verzeichnis der Hamburger Reedereien, 1824-1888, Mitteilungen aus dem Museum fur Hamburgische Geschichte, N. F., Bd. 5. (Hamburg: Museum fur Hamburgische Geschichte, 1969), Bd. 2, S. 207, gives the following additional information: Master:1839-1842 - J. Wendt, 1842-1844 - J. C. Wienholtz, 1845-1846 - P. B. Matzen, 1847-1852 - J. H. Niemann, 1852-1854 - G. H. Schladetsch, 1854-1855 - H. P. Rickleffs, 1855-1857 - C. Christiansen, 1857-1858 - H. H. Paap, 1858-1860 - T. A. Tonnessen (Dahl?), 1860-1861 - F. C. L. Brusch, 1861-1862 - P. E. Jorgensen, 1862-1864 - J. P. Frahm. Voyages: 1839-1849 - New York, exclusively, 1849/1850 - New York (as the ROMANOW, under the Russian flag), 1850-1852 - New York (again as the SIR ISAAC NEWTON, under the Hamburg flag), 1852 - New Orleans/Liverpool, 1852/1853 - New York/Mobile, 1853 - Quebec/Hull, 1853/1854 - New York, 1854/1855 - New York/Hull, 1855/1856 - Sydney/intermediate ports/Batavia, 1857 - New York, 1857 - New York/London, 1858 - New Orleans/Hartlepool, 1858/1860 - Dona Francisca/Desterro/intermediate ports/Callao/Cardiff, 1860 - New York, 1860/1861 - New York, 1861 - Quebec/Newcastle, 1861/1862 - England/intermediate ports/Newport (Wales), 1862/1863 - Dona Francisca/Bahia, 1863 - New York. She was sold in 1864 to Swedish owners, her new master being Capt. Dieckmann. There is a black-and-white reproduction of an oil painting of the SIR ISAAC NEWTON, together with two other Sloman sailing vessels, LORD BROUGHAM and SIR ROBERT PEEL, in Ernst Hieke, Rob. M. Sloman Jr., errichtet 1793, Veroffentlichungen der Wirtschaftsgeschichtlichen Forschungsstelle e.V., Hamburg, Bd. 30 (Hamburg: Verlag Hanseatischer Merkur, 1968). [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 23 October 1997]


SIRIUS
See SCANDINAVIA.


SIR ROBERT HALE
The SIR ROBERT SALE, built in Moulmein, Burma, in 1843. 741 tons (readmeasured in 1875 to 704 tons); 138.3 x 29.9 x 20.5 feet (length x breadth x depth of hold); poop 48 feet long, forecastle 21 feet 8 inches (1877 readmeasured at 22 feet) long. Originally rigged as a ship, the SIR ROBERT SALE was re-rigged as a bark in 1867/68. The following information is taken from Lloyd's Register of Shipping for 1844/45-1881/82: Master: 1844/45-1850/51 - [not given]; 1851/52-1853/54 - W. Loader; 1854/55-1860/61 - Santry; 1861/62-1867/68 - Lansdown; 1867/68-1868/69 - W. Hawkins; 1868/69-1875/76 - J. Eales; 1875/76-1879/80 - Wake; 1879/80-1881/82 - Wooldridge. Owner: 1844/45-1853/54 - Gldstanes; 1854/55-1874/75 - Teighe & Co; 1875/76-1879/80 - J. D. Wake & Co; 1879/80-1881/82 - W. Paterson. Registry: London. Port of Survey:1844/45-1853/54 - London; 1854/55 - Liverpool; 1855/56-1881/82 - London. Destined Voyage (-1873/74): 1844/45-1846/47 - Madras; 1847/48 - Madras; 1848/49-1850/51 - [not given]; 1851/52-1853/54 - China; 1854/55 - Calcutta; 1855/56-1857/58 - [not given]; 1858/59-1859/60 - India; 1860/61 - [not given]; 1861/62-1864/65 - India; 1864/65-1865/66 - Australia; 1865/66-1867/68 - India; 1867/68-1869/70 - Australia; 1869/70-1870/71 - Kurrache; 1871/72-1873/74 - India. Ian Hawkins Nicholson, Log of logs : a catalogue of logs, journals, shipboard diaries, letters, and all forms of voyage narratives, 1788 to1988, for Australia and New Zealand and surrounding oceans, Roebuck Society Publication Nos. 41, 47 (2 vols; Yaroomba, Qld: The Author jointly with the Australian Association for Maritime History, [1990]-1993), indicates that the SIR ROBERT SALE made voyages, inter alia, from London to Auckland in 1847, from Plymouth to Melbourne in 1852, and from Plymouth to Geelong in 1852. She was also apparently in the Sunda Strait, and within sight of Krakatoa, when the volcano erupted on 26 August 1883. The latest volume of Lloyd's Register to which I have access is for the year 1881/82. For the subsequent history, ultimate fate, and any extant pictures of the SIR ROBERT HALE, contact the
Australian National Maritime Museum in Sydney. The ANMM has placed a number of very helpful subject guides, called Pathfinders, on line, of which No. 2: Immigration Sailing Ships is of particular relevance to the history of the SIR ROBERT HALE. - [Posted to the Australia Mailing List by Michael Palmer 19 January 1998]


SIR ROBERT PEEL (1)
The SIR ROBERT PEEL was built in New York by William H. Webb, and launched in 1846. 940/956 tons (old/new measurement); 159 ft 6 in x 36 ft x 21 ft 7 in (length x beam x depth of hold); 2 decks; 19 1/2 ft draft. She ran for Grinnell, Minturn & Co's Red Swallowtail Line of New York-London packets for 34 years, from 1846 until the end of the line in 1880, when she was sold for $8,200 and cleared for Trieste under British colors. During the period of her packet service her westbound passages from London to New York averaged 37 days, her shortest passage being 22 days, her longest 56 days [Robert Greenhalgh Albion, Square-riggers on Schedule; The New York Sailing Packets to England, France, and the Cotton Ports (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1938), pp. 272, 282-283, 299]. - [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 30 April 1998]


SIR ROBERT PEEL (2)
Despite her name, the "Sir Robert Peel" was a thoroughly German vessel, a full-rigged ship built in 1852 in Lubeck by the shipbuilder Meyer for the Hamburg shipping company of Robert M. Sloman. Her tonnage is given as 250 Commerzlasten, or approximately 690.6 shipping tons/773.3 tons U.S. (1 Commerzlast = 6000 Pfund = 2,806.266 kg), and her measurements (length x breadth x depth), "zwischen den Steven" as 140.6 x 31.3 x 20.6 Hamburg Fusse or approximately 132.2 x 29.4 x 19.4 English feet (1 Hamburg Fuss = .94 English foot). Captains: J. C. Wienholtz, 1852-1854; J Knudtsen, 1854-1855; H. L. Visser, 1855-1856; N. J. Jurgens, 1856-1863; P. E. Jorgensen, 1863. She served almost exclusively as a regular trader between Hamburg and New York, although she did make voyages to New Orleans in 1852 and 1854, to San Jose (Guatemala) in 1855, to Sunderland (England) in 1861, and to London in 1862. She was lost in the North Sea, near the island of Juist (off the German coast, near the border with the Netherlands), on 24 November 1863 [Walter Kresse, Seeschiffs-Verzeichnis der Hamburger Reedereien, 1824-1888, Mitteilungen aus dem Museum fur Hamburgische Geschichte, N.F., 5 (Hamburg: Museum fur Hamburgische Geschichte, 1969), vol. 2, p. 209]..[Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 10 June 1997]


SKYTTEREN
See SUEVIC.


SLAVONIA (1)
The "Slavonia" of 1887 was a 2215 ton vessel belonging to the Hamburg America Line. She was built by Raylton Dixon & Co. at Middlesborough in 1883 as the "Macassar" and later acquired the same year by HAL and renamed "Slavonia". Eventually sold to Deutsche Levante in 1897 and renamed "Leros". No longer in service in 1911. Stettin (on the Baltic Sea)is now in Poland and is called Szczecin. .[Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Ted Finch - 15 June 1997]


SLAVONIA (2)
The steamship SLAVONIA was built by Sir J Laing & Sons, Sunderland (ship #600) (engines by Wallsend Slipway Co Ltd) and launched on 15 November 1902 as the YAMUNA for the British India Line. 10,606 tons; 155.44 x 18.13 meters/510 x 59.5 feet (length x breadth); 1 funnel, 2 masts; twin-screw propulsion (triple-expansion engines), service speed 13 knots; accommodation for 40 passengers in 1st class and 800 in steerage. June 1903, completed (8,831 tons). 1904, purchased by the Cunard Line; renamed SLAVONIA; refitted for the North Atlantic service (10,606 tons; accommodation for 71 passengers in 1st class, 74 passengers in 2nd class, and 1,954 in steerage). 17 March 1904, first voyage, Sunderland-Trieste (departed 29 March)-Fiume-Palermo-New York. 5 May 1909, last voyage, Trieste-Fiume-Palermo-New York. 11 June 1909, wrecked at Flores, in the Azores, without loss of life; the passengers were taken off by the steamships PRINZESS IRENE (Norddeutscher Lloyd) and BATAVIA (Hamburg-America Line) [Noel Reginald Pixell Bonsor, North Atlantic Seaway; An Illustrated History of the Passenger Services Linking the Old World with the New (2nd ed.; Jersey, Channel Islands: Brookside Publications), vol. 1 (1975), p. 156; Arnold Kludas, Die grossen Passagierschiffe der Welt; Eine Dokumentation, Bd. 1: 1858-1912 (2nd ed.; Oldenburg/Hamburg: Gerhard Stalling, c1972), pp. 98-99 (2 photographs)]. Also pictured in Michael J. Anuta, Ships of Our Ancestors (Menominee, MI: Ships of Our Ancestors, 1983), p. 310, from the Alex Shaw Collection, Steamship Historical Society of America, Langsdale Library, University of Baltimore, 1420 Maryland Ave., Baltimore, MD 21201 - [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 19 August 1998]


SMIDT
The "Smidt" was the only vessel owned by Captain Raschen, who commanded her, and his partners. She was an iron built vessel, built in 1868 by Johann Lange of Bremen and was probably the first ocean going steamer built in Germany. Her dimensions were 1672 gross tons, length 210ft x beam 39.5ft.,one funnel, two masts, single screw and a speed of 9 knots. On her maiden voyage from Geestemunde on the River Weser to New York, she carried 766 passengers. She left Geestemunde on 4th April 1868 and did not reach New York until the 3rd May. She then sailed between Bremerhaven and NY until 1873. In 1869, she left Bremen on 11th Jan., Gravesend on 27th Jan. and did not reach NY until 5th March after meeting hurricane conditions which washed the bridge overboard and flooded the cabin and engine room. She was sold in 1874 to Sidenburg & Wendt of Bremen, her engines were removed and she was converted to a three masted barque. In 1896 she was abandoned at sea and was towed to the Azores and later to Hamburg where she was condemned. In 1897 she was scrapped at Briton Ferry, S.Wales.[Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Ted Finch 2 August 1997]


SMYRNA
The "Smyrna was a clipper ship engaged in the wool trade. She was sunk in collision with the steamer "Moto" on 28.4.1888 during thick fog off the Isle of Wight when outward bound to Sydney, with the loss of her captain and 11 crew. [The Colonial Clippers by Basil Lubbock] - [Posted to the ShipsList by Ted Finch - 7 June 1998]


SNAPDRAGON
The SNAPDRAGON was a "medium clipper" bark, built in New York in 1853 by William H. Webb for Wakeman & Dimon, of New York. She was 619 tons, 140 feet long x 29 feet 4 inches in beam, with a hold depth of 18 feet. She appears to have been a transient trader: No record of any voyages in 1853, but on 16 April 1854, Sherwood, master, she arrived at New York, from Antwerp 12 March, with 212 steerage passengers [passenger list, dated 19 April 1854, published in Germans to America, vol. 6, pp. 395-396, where the vessel is incorrectly given as the DRAGON]. On 4 June 1855, she cleared Philadelphia for San Francisco, where she arrived on 8 October 1855, after a passage of 126 days. She sailed from the Gulf of California for Hamburg early in 1856, and was in the South Atlantic, at lat 31 40 S, lon 27 35 W, when on 21 February 1856, she spoke with the whaler SPLENDID. In 1858, she sailed from China to Britain in 104 days with a cargo of tea [William Armstrong Fairburn, Merchant Sail (Center Lovell, ME: Fairburn Marine Educational Foundation, [1945-55]), II.1517, 1536 III.1881; IV.2229, V.2803, 2808, 2815; VI.3891, 3933, 3938; New York Times, 5 April 1856, 8e]. I have no information on the later history of the SNAPDRAGON. However, you should be able to obtain some information on her ultimate fate from her registration certificates. (A registration certificate--which indicates the name of a vessel, her tonnage, when and where she was built, and her current owner and master--was issued when a vessel first registered at a port, and upon every change of ownership or repair extensive enough to be considered a rebuild. When a vessel was registered at another port, or was lost, wrecked, or broken up, the last registration certificate was returned to the port authorities, with a note indicating the reason why.) The SNAPDRAGON was registered at New York, and you can obtain abstracts or (preferably) photocopies of her registration certificates from the National Archives. (When writing to the National Archives, be certain to include the type and name of the vessel, her tonnage, and where, when, and by and for whom she was built: "bark SNAPDRAGON, 619 tons, built in New York in 1853 by William H. Webb for Wakeman & Dimon"). [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 13 August 1997]


SOFIA M
See LAPLAND (1)


SOLGLIMT
See POTSDAM .


SOLIS
The "Solis" was built by Palmer Bros & Co, Jarrow-on-Tyne in 1866. She was a 2,869 gross ton ship, length 335ft x beam 42.5ft, clipper stem, one funnel, two masts, iron construction, single screw and a speed of 10 knots. There was accommodation for 72-1st and 800-3rd class passengers. Launched on 15/5/1866 as the "Manhattan" for the British owned Guion Line, she sailed on her maiden voyage from Liverpool for Queenstown (Cobh) and New York on 8/8/1866. In 1874 she was rebuilt to 3,231 tons and fitted with compound engines by Fawcett & Preston, Liverpool and on 20/1/1875 commenced a single round voyage between Liverpool and Philadelphia, under charter to the American Line. She resumed the Liverpool - Queenstown - New York service on 4/4/1875 and started her last voyage on this route on 3/6/1875. She then went to Warren Line, was renamed "Massachusetts" and commenced Liverpool - Boston sailings on 1/1/1876. In 1881 she became the "City of Lincoln" for the Thistle Line and on 7/9/1881 sailed from Liverpool for New York and London, and on 29/10/1881 started London - New York crossings. She commenced her second and last voyage on this service on 23/12/1881 and in 1884 went to Spanish owners and was renamed "Solis". In 1885 she was sold to Cassels of Liverpool and was fitted with triple expansion engines and went back to her previous name of "City of Lincoln". On 15/8/1902 she was wrecked near Cape Town with no loss of life. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.2, p.708] She was only named "Solis" for a short period and I have no details of her voyages under this name. - [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 3 April 1998]


SOLON
The SOLON was a bark (a 3-masted sailing vessel, square-rigged on the fore- and mainmasts, and fore-and-aft rigged on the mizzenmast), built by the shipbuilding firm of J. H. Bosse, of Burg, near Bremen, and launched on 12 April 1855. 229 Commerzlasten; 37,6 x 9 x 4,6 meters (length x breadth x depth of hold). Her original owners were the brothers Frerk, Hinrich, and Bernhard Balleer, all of Vegesack, each of whom held a 1/3 share. Hinrich Balleer was her first captain, being succeeded in 1857 by J. Gardes. In 1858, the SOLON was sold to H. Bischoff & Co, Bremen for 22,750 Reichstaler, but was almost immediately sold "to Oldenburg", and sent on a round-the-world voyage. On 15 December 1858, Heinrich Jurgen Rohde, from Bremen, master, she sailed from Bremerhaven for Capetown, from where she sailed in March 1859, bound for Australia. After calling at Moreton Bay, as you indicate above, she set sail for Sydney, but was stranded on Moreton Island; she was gotten off safely, and arrived at Sydney on 11 July 1859. Taking on a load of coal, she proceeded to the Philippines, where on 24 November she was loading sugar at the rate of L1 17s. 6d. per ton for the return trip to Sydney. At Sydney she took on a cargo of coal, hay, and ships stores and sailed for Goolong, where the cargo was to be delivered to the Oldenburg ship ARNIM, but on 28 April 1860, she ran aground on Crookhaven Head, near Shoalhaven; one ships's boy was drowned [Peter-Michael Pawlik, Von der Weser in die Welt; Die Geschichte der Segelschiffe von Weser und Lesum und ihrer Bauwerften 1770 bis 1893, Schriften des Deutschen Schiffahrtsmuseums, Bd. 33 (Hamburg: Kabel, c1993), p. 392, no. 93]. - [Posted to the Australia Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 27 January 1998]


SOMMELSDYK
The "Sommelsdyk" of 1943 was the third vessel of that name owned by the Holland America Line. She was a 9,227 gross ton ship, length 473ft x beam 62ft, one funnel, two masts, twin screw and a speed of 15.5 knots. She had accommodation for 12 cabin class passengers. Built by A.P.Moller, Odense in 1939 for the New York - Java via Capetown service and in August 1942 was converted into a US transport. On Christmas Day 1944 she was hit by an aerial torpedo in Leyte Gulf, causing a 30ft x 20ft hole but was repaired and on 9th May 1946 was returned to the Dutch government, refitted and chartered to Holland America Line. On 4th June 1965 she was sold for scrap to Castelon, Spain and broken up. Her sister ship was the "Sloterdyk" [Holland America Line, a 120th Anniversary Celebration in Postcards by Peter C.Kohler, published by Ship Pictorial Publications, The Cabinet, High Street, Coltishall, Norfolk] [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 22 December 1997]


SOMERSET
See CITY OF ROME (2)


SONDERBURG
See POTSDAM .


SOPHOCLES
The "Sophocles" was a 4,748 gross ton, 14 knot ship belonging to the Aberdeen Line (Geo.Thompson & Co). She was built by Harland & Wolff, Belfast in 1883 as the "Ionic" for the White Star Line and was bought by Aberdeen Line in 1900. On 23/10/1900 she commenced her first voyage from London to Capetown, Melbourne and Sydney, and started her last sailing on 21/8/1906. She was scrapped at Morecombe in 1908. [North Star to Southern Cross by John.M.Maber] [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 10 November 1997]


SORRENTO (1)
See TAMPICO.


SORRENTO (2)
She was a 2364 gross ton iron built vessel, built by A. Stephens & Sons of Glasgow in 1881 for the Sloman Line. Her dimensions were length 320ft x beam 36.2ft, straight stem, one funnel, three masts, single screw and a speed of 11 knots. There was accommodation for 600-3rd class passengers only. She was launched on 21/12/1881 and underwent her sea trials on 31/12/1881. She was probably used on the Australia service until 1886 when the Union Line was formed and she sailed on her first voyage from Hamburg to New York on 24/4/1886. She stayed on this service until making her last transatlantic voyage, leaving Hamburg on 13/9/1899. I have no knowledge of what she was used for after this date until she was wrecked near Cape Finisterre, Spain on 10/11/1902. [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Ted Finch]

The steamship SORRENTO was built by A. Stephen & Sons, Glasgow, and launched on 21 December 1881, for the Hamburg shipping firm of Rob. M. Sloman & Co. 2,364 tons; 97,49 x 11,02 x 7,5 meters (length x breadth x depth of hold); straight bow, 1 funnel, 3 masts; iron construction, screw propulsion, service speed 11 knots; accommodation for 600 passengers in steerage. The SORRENTO was intended for Sloman's emigrant service to Australia, begun in early 1881, and she was transferred to the Australia-Sloman-Linie-Actiengesellschaft on 31 July 1882. In 1886, Norddeutscher Lloyd, helped by a substantial postal subsidy from the German government, initiated an express service from Bremen to Australia by way of the Suez Canal, and Sloman, convinced that there was insufficient trade for two German companies on the same route, withdrew his Australian service. In March 1886, he joined his nephew, Edward Carr, who had a cargo and steerage passenger service between Hamburg and New York, and with him founded the Union Line, in which each held a 50 per cent stake, and to which each contributed six ships; the firm was a holding company only, and Carr and Sloman retained ownership of the vessels (the SORRENTO was officially transferred from the Australia-Sloman Line back to Rob. M. Sloman & Co on 28 December 1888). 24 April 1886, first voyage of the SORRENTO from Hamburg to New York. 13 September 1899, last voyage of the SORRENTO fr om Hamburg to New York; then service as a cargo vessel. 10 November 1902, wrecked on the Minarzo Rocks off Cape Finisterre, Spain [Ernst Hieke, Rob. M. Sloman Jr., errichtet 1793, Veroffentlichungen der Wirtschaftsgeschichtlichen Forschungsstelle e.V., Hamburg, 30 (Hamburg: Verlag Hanseatischer Merkur, 1968), pp. 384, 392, and 396; Walter Kresse, ed., Seeschiffs-Verzeichnis der Hamburger Reedereien, 1824-1888, Mitteilungen aus dem Museum fur Hamburgische Geschichte, N. F., Bd. 5. (Hamburg: Museum fur Hamburgische Geschichte, 1969), vol. 1, p. 104, and vol. 2, p. 220; Noel Reginald Pixell Bonsor, North Atlantic Seaway; An Illustrated History of the Passenger Services Linking the Old World with the New (2nd ed.; Jersey, Channel Islands: Brookside Publications), vol. 3 (1979), pp. 1163-1164, 1166]. - [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 16 April 1998]


SOUTH CAROLINA
The "South Carolina" was a 1301 ton wooden screw steamer built in 1851 by Jabez Williams of New York for the Atlantic Steam Navigation Co. Her dimensions were 202.5ft x 38ft. and she had a clipper stem, one funnel and three masts, service speed 9 knots. She sailed from Charleston SC for Liverpool but went aground on the Charlestown Bar and had to put in to New York for repairs to her propeller. She eventually sailed for Liverpool and returned to NY on 23.11.1852 with 72 passengers. Her engines were removed in 1853 and she spent the rest of her life as a sailing vessel. Very little seems to be known of her after this date but in 1874 she was owned by J. Alexander of Liverpool. [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Ted Finch - 8 July 1997]


SOUTHERN CROSS
S.S.SOUTHERN CROSS - Launched July 20,1919 as the Sea Girt. Laid down as a Troop Ship S.S. Manmasco. Builder:New York Ship Building Corp. Camden, New Jersey. Owned by : U.S.Shipping Board, Philda.Pa. Yard Number 241. Gross Tons 13,789. 535'x 72.2' feet. Steam Geared Turbine Twin Screw 13,000 SHP. Speed 17 to 18.5 knots. Passengers 250 lst 300 3rd Class. Crew 203. Sept. 1921 Renamed S.S. Southern Cross. Operated by Munson Steamship Lines. Either on New York to East Coast of South America run. or New York to Northern Europe Run ( German North Sea Ports ). 1926 Sold by USSB to Munson Line. Sept. 1938 Munson Line ran into financial problems and sold the vessel back to the United States Maritime Commission ( ex U.S.Shipping Board). 1939 taken over by the U.S. Navy and renamed U.S.S. Wharton. 1947 Returned to U.S.Maritime Commssion and laid up. 1952 Broken up by Boston Metals in Baltimore, Md. This ship was known as a 535 Class vessel. ( 535 feet) - [Posted to The ShipsList by Captain C.J. Carroll - 12 April 1998]


SOUTHERN EMPIRE
My G Grandfather John White came to Australia on the Southern Empire (please note there were at least two ships of this name sailing at the same time). The ship left Liverpool on the 18th April 1864 Captained by Thomas Reeves and arrived Melbourne on 30 July 1864. There were 4 cabin passengers and 450 steerage passengers. Bright and Co were the agents. The ship was owned by the Black Ball Line. According to Lloyd's it was 1534 tons. I believe it was previously called the Jacob A. Westervelt. This ship caught fire on the 11 April 1860 in New York Harbour. - [Posted to The ShipsList by Ian Butterworth - 24 January 1998]


SOUTHERN QUEEN In 1866, the Ruddocks built for Lamport & Holt a ship of 789 tons, Launched as BLONDE but registered at Liverpool as SOUTHERN QUEEN. She was altered in 1880 to a barque, as so often happened at that time, and was sold to Norwegians in 1888, another common occurrence of the 1880's - Year 1866; Name BLONDE; Rig ship; Tons 789; Builder F. & J. Ruddock Liverpool; Disposal 1867 GP. Remarks (renamed Southern Queen) . Note: the GP stands for Governors Pass. This authorized the ships to sail to England, to the new owners (Lamport & Holt), prior to being registered. - [Saint John Ships and Their Builders by Esher Clark Wright, DLitt.] - [Posted to The ShipsList by Gery Swiggum - 13 May 1998]


SOUTHLAND
See VADERLAND (3).


SOUTHWARK
The "Southwark" was a 8,607 gross ton vessel built in 1893 by Wm.Denny & Bros, Dumbarton for the American Line. Her details were - length 480ft x beam 57.2ft, one funnel, four masts, twin screw and a speed of 14 knots. There was accommodation for 100-2nd and 929-3rd class passengers. Launched on 4/7/1893, she sailed from Liverpool on her maiden voyage to Philadelphia on 28/12/1893. In 1895 she went to the Red Star Line and commenced her first voyage from Philadelphia to New York and Antwerp on 8/8/1895. On 31/8/1895 she commenced her first Antwerp - New York run and in 1899 (or earlier) her 2nd class accommodation was increased to 250. She sailed on her last voyage on the Antwerp - New York on 21/3/1903 and was then chartered to the Dominion Line and commenced running for their Liverpool - Quebec - Montreal service on 13/5/1903. In May 1910 she was chartered to the Allan Line and ran between Glasgow, Quebec and Montreal. On 9/7/1910 she commenced her last Montreal - Quebec - Glasgow sailing (2 round voyages) and went back to the Dominion Line. In May 1911 she made her last Liverpool - Quebec - Montreal sailing and was scrapped the same year. [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 27 October 1997]


SOVEREIGN
The "Sovereign" was built by Sir Raylton Dixon, Middlesborough in 1886. She was a 1,047 gross ton ship, length 244.2ft x beam 33.3ft x depth 16.3ft, single screw and a speed of 12 knots. There was accommodation for 112 passengers (as built). Built as the "African" and used for Union Line's South African coastal service, she was sold to F.H.Powell & Co in 1893, renamed "Graceful" and used on the Liverpool - London service. In 1902 she was sold to Ostlande Lloyd, renamed "Sovereign", fitted with a taller funnel and put onto the Oslo - Newcastle route (weekly each way with the "Sterling(2)). In 1906 she went to the Fred Olsen Line, and in 1912 went to the Bergen Line and was renamed "Zeta". Used on the Bergen - Continent service, she made a 1914 voyage to Newcastle with stranded tourists at the outbreak of war. After the Great War, she opened a new Bergen - Antwerp service in place of the pre-war service by the German Neptun Line, and was eventually scrapped in 1931. [A Century of North Sea Passenger Steamers by A.Greenway] - [E-mail from Ted Finch - 20 June 1998]


SOVETSKY SOJUS
See ALBERT BALLIN.


SOVJETSKAJA ROSSIJA
See THURINGIA.


SPAARNDAM
The "Spaarndam" of the Holland America Line was built by Harland & Wolff, Belfast (engines by J.Jack & Co, Liverpool) in 1881 as the "Asiatic" for the White Star Line, she was a 4,368 gross ton ship, length 427.8ft x beam 41.9ft, one funnel, four masts (rigged for sail), single screw and a speed of 13 knots. Launched on 30/4/1881, her name was changed to "Arabic" and she left Liverpool on her maiden voyage to New York on 10/9/1881. She started her third and last voyage on this service on 2/12/1881. She was then chartered to the Occidental & Oriental Line and sailed on 4/2/1882 from Liverpool for Suez Canal, Hong Kong and San Francisco. On 30/3/1887 she returned to the N.Atlantic and sailed from London for Queenstown and New York and on 12/5/1887 resumed Liverpool - New York sailings. She reverted to San Francisco - Yokohama - Hong Kong voyages in 1888 and in 1890 was sold to Holland America Line. Renamed "Spaarndam", she started her first Rotterdam - New York voyage on 29/3/1890. In 1899 she was refitted to carry 2nd and 3rd class passengers only and commenced her final voyage on 7/2/1901 when she left Rotterdam for New York. She was scrapped at Preston the same year.North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P. Bonsor, vol.2, p.758; vol.3, p.912] - [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 13 July 1998]


SPAIN
S.S. Spain from Liverpool landing in NY 11/20/1886 - Built for the National Line by Laird Bros., Birkenhead, in drydock, in 1871. 4,512 tons; 425 x 43 feet (length x beam); straight bow, 2 funnels, 4 masts; iron construction, screw propulsion, service speed 13 knots; accommodation for 120 1st- and 1,400 3rd-class passengers. 9 May 1871, floated. 16 August 1871, maiden voyage, Liverpool-Queenstown-New York. 1883, 2 voyages chartered to the Inman Line, Liverpool-Queenstown-New York. 11 February 1890, first voyage, London-New York. 23 November 1890, last voyage, Liverpool-New York 31 January 1896, last voyage, London-New York. 1896, scrapped [Noel Reginald Pixell Bonsor, North Atlantic Seaway; An Illustrated History of the Passenger Services Linking the Old World with the New (2nd ed.; Jersey, Channel Islands: Brookside Publications), vol. 2, p. 613]. Michael J. Anuta, Ships of Our Ancestors (Menominee, MI: Ships of Our Ancestors, 1983; reprint Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., [1993]), p. 312, courtesy of the Peabody Essex Museum, East India Square, Salem, MA 01970 [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer]


SPARTAN PRINCE
Built by Short Bros, Sunderland (engines by Blair & Co Ltd, Stockton) for the Prince Line. 3,299 tons; 106,98 x 13,56 meters (351 x 44.5 feet; length x beam). Clipper bow, 1 funnel, 2 masts; screw propulsion, service speed 12 knots; accommodation for 45 1st-, and 1,150 3rd-class passengers. 14 July 1897, launched. 22 December 1897, maiden voyage, Sunderland-New York. 15 January 1898, first voyage, New York-Naples-Genoa-Leghorn (departed 22 February)-Genoa-Naples-New York. 30 June 1902, last voyage, Leghorn-Genoa-Naples-Palermo-New York (transferred to service between New York and South Africa). 1908, sold; 29 August 1908, sunk in collision off Brazil with the sailing bark TIMANDRA [Bonsor, North Atlantic Seaway., vol. 3 (1979), p.1234]. [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer]


SPREE
See KAISERIN MARIA THERESIA.


STAMPALIA
The "Stampalia" was built in 1909 as the "Oceania" by Cantieri Navale Riuniti at Spezia, Italy for La Veloce. She was a 8999 ton vessel, 476ft x 56ft., two funnels, two masts, twin screw, speed 16 knots. She had accommodation for 100 1st and 2,400 3rd class passengers. She originally sailed between Genoa, Palermo, Naples and New York. In 1911 she was altered to carry 30 1st, 220 2nd, and 2,400 3rd class passengers and sailed between Genoa, Naples and NY. In 1912 she was renamed "Stampalia" and continued on the same service until 17.8.1916 when she was torpedoed and sunk in the Aegean Sea by the German submarine UB-47. [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Ted Finch - 12 July 1997]


STAD HAARLEM
The "Stad Haarlem" was built in 1875 by Inglis & Co, Glasgow for the Royal Netherlands Steamship Co. She was a 2,729 gross ton iron built, barque rigged, screw steamer with a speed of 12 knots. In Feb.1879, as the result of a proposal by the NZ authorities who had been investigating the possibility of direct steam communication with the UK, The New Zealand Shipping Co, in association with Shaw, Savill & Co, chartered this vessel for a voyage starting on 5.2.1874 from London via St Vincent and the Cape of Good Hope to Port Chalmers, Lyttelton and Wellington. Despite a full cargo and a full complement of passengers, including 600 emigrants, the venture was a financial failure and the ship only made the one NZ voyage. [ North Star to Southern Cross by John M.Maber] [Posted to The ShipsList bt Ted Finch - 16 December 1997]

The "Stad Haarlem" was built 1875 by A&J.Inglis, Glasgow for the Royal Netherlands Steamship Co. She was a 2,865 gross ton ship, length 350ft x beam 38.3ft,one funnel, three masts(barque rigged for sail), iron construction, single screw and a speed of 12 knots. There was accommodation for approx.600 passengers. Launched on 23/1/1875, she sailed for Royal Netherlands until 1879, when she was jointly chartered by Shaw Saville & Albion and New Zealand Shipping Co for a single voyage from London (dep 5/2/1879) to Capetown and New Zealand. This was found not to be a financial success and the ship was sold in 1879 to the French company, Compagnie Generale Transatlantique. They renamed her "Ferdinand de Lesseps" and on 14/9/1879 she left Marseilles on her first voyage to Panama. On 30/10/1880 she commenced the first of 3 round voyages between Havre and New York and on 28/4/1881 started her first Marseilles - New York voyage. Her last voyage on this service commenced 10/6/1882 (7 round voyages) and in 1911 she was scrapped at Dunkirk. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P. Bonsor, vol.2, p.654] [North Star to Southern Cross by John M.Maber] - [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 30 January 1998]


STARLIGHT (1)
STARLIGHT (1), a side-wheel packet, built at Jeffersonville, Indiana, in 1858. 280 tons; 162 x 31 x 6 ft (length x beam x depth of hold); wood hull; engines, inside diameter of cylinder 20 in, length of piston stroke 7 ft. Ran New Orleans - Shreveport, Capt. Charles Hayes. Rebuilt after the war to measure 166.6 x 33.6 x 6.3 ft. The Hayes family continued to operate her New Orleans-Red River until they sold her in February 1868 to J. B. Simonds, New Orleans, who resold her in March 1868 to Capt. Daniel J. Crowley, New Orleans. Burned at Algiers, Louisiana, 23 April 1868 [Frederick Way, Jr., Way's Packet Directory, 1848-1994; Passenger Steamboats of the Mississippi River System Since the Advent of Photography in Mid-Continent America (revised edition; Athens, Ohio: Ohio University Press, 1994) p. 432, packet #5181]. [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 16 December 1997]


STARLIGHT (2)
STARLIGHT (2), sternwheel packet, built at Belle Vernon, Pennsylvania, in 1862. 214 tons; wood hull. Capt. T. M. Harton ran her Pittsburgh-Louisville-St. Louis most of the first year. At the time of Morgan's raid in 1863, she was under the command of Capt. Wood, at Marietta, on the lower river, grounded in the foot of Blennerhasset Island, with a cargo of flour, etc., consigned to the U.S. army; the Parkersburg ferryboat lightened her off. Burned at Gretna, Louisiana, 25 April 1868 [Frederick Way, Jr., Way's Packet Directory, 1848-1994; Passenger Steamboats of the Mississippi River System Since the Advent of Photography in Mid-Continent America (revised edition; Athens, Ohio: Ohio University Press, 1994) p. 432, packet #5181A]. [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 16 December 1997]


STAR OF RUSSIA
The "Star of Russia" was an iron full rigged ship, built by Harland & Wolff, Belfast in 1874 for J.P.Corry & Co, Belfast. Her dinensions were 1,892 gross tons, length 275ft x beam 40.5ft. Launched on 12/12/1874, she sailed on her maiden voyage from London to Calcutta on 5/4/1875. She continued on the London - Calcutta service until 1881 when she transferred to the London - Australia run and occasional London - San Francisco, and Sydney - San Francisco voyages. In March 1898 she was sold to Shaw Saville. In 1901 she went to Alaska Packers Association and was used between San Francisco and Alaska until 1925. In 1926 she was sold to French owners and renamed "Bougainville". Sailed to Apia the same year with a cargo of timber and was reduced to a hulk. [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 27 October 1997]


STATENDAM (1)
The "Statendam" of 1903 was built by Harland & Wolff, Belfast in 1898 for the Holland America Line. She was a 10,491 gross ton ship, length 515.3ft x beam 59.8ft, one funnel, two masts, twin screw and a speed of 14 knots. Accommodation was provided for 200-1st, 175-2nd and 2,000-3rd class passengers. Launched on 7/5/1898, she sailed from Rotterdam on her maiden voyage to New York on 24/8/1898. She stayed on this service until her last voyage commenced on 22/1/1910, after which she was sold to the Allan Line and renamed "Scotian". Refitted to 10,322 gross tons and with accommodation for 550-2nd and 1,150-3rd class passengers, she commenced sailing between Glasgow, Halifax and Portland in March 1911. She started her first Glasgow - Quebec - Montreal voyage on 6/5/1911, her first Glasgow - Boston voyage on 18/11/1911, and her first London - Quebec - Montreal voyage on 9/5/1912. In January 1914 she was chartered to Canadian Pacific and completed a single round voyage between Liverpool and St John NB. Her last London - Quebec - Montreal sailing commenced on 21/8/1914 and on the homeward passage, she was used to transport part of the Canadian Expeditionary Force to the UK. Between Nov.1914 and March 1915 she was used as an accommodation ship for German prisoners at Ryde, Isle of Wight and in 1917 went to Canadian Pacific, who had taken over the Allan Line. Her first voyage for her new owners started on 4/9/1918 when she left Liverpool for New York and her first Liverpool - St John NB sailing commenced 3/1/1919. Later the same year her accommodation was altered to carry 304-cabin, and 542-3rd class passengers and on 12/11/1919 she commenced sailings between Antwerp, Southampton, Quebec and Montreal. She resumed the London - Quebec - Montreal service on 16/5/1920 and between 1920-21 made four trooping voyages to Bombay for the British government. She was renamed "Marglen" for Canadian Pacific on 16/11/1922 and on 15/5/1923 commenced her last North Atlantic voyage between London, Havre, Southampton, Quebec and Montreal. Between 1923 and 1926 she completed 15 round voyages to Bombay and on 30/12/1926 was sold to D.L.Pittaluga of Genoa and was scrapped the following year. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.3,p.912 / vol.1,p.324] [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 2 Janaury 1998]


STATENDAM (2)
See JUSTICIA.


STATE OF ALABAMA
The "State of Alabama" was built by T.Wingate & Co, Glasgow in 1873 for the British, State Line. She was a 2,313 gross ton ship, length 321.2ft x beam 36.2ft, one funnel, three masts, iron construction, single screw and a speed of 12 knots. There was accommodation for 30-1st, 50-intermediate and 200-3rd class passengers. Launched on 11/3/1873 as the "Alabama" she sailed from Glasgow on her maiden voyage to Larne and New York on 24/6/1873. In Dec.1873 she was renamed "State of Alabama" and in the same month commenced sailings between Liverpool and New Orleans. On 27/2/1874 she started her first Glasgow - New York voyage and her last voyage on this route commenced on 17/2/1888. She subsequently carried cargo only and in 1891 was sold to the Allan Line, but never sailed for them. She was resold and eventually scrapped in 1896. [ North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.2,p.866] [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch -13 December 1997]


STATE OF NEBRASKA
The steamship STATE OF NEBRASKA was built by the London & Glasgow Co, Glasgow, for the State Line, and launched on 6 September 1880. 3,986 tons; 117,4 x 13,19 meters/385.2 x 43.3 feet; straight bow, 1 funnel, 3 masts; iron construction, screw propulsion, service speed 13 knots; accommodation for 100 passengers in 1st class, 75 in intermediate class, and 825 in steerage. 5 November 1880, maiden voyage, Glasgow-Larne-New York. 24 October 1890, last voyage for the State Line, Glasgow-Moville-New York. 1891, acquired by the Allan Line. 8 May 1891, first voyage for the Allan Line, Glasgow-Moville-New York. 28 September 1901, last voyage, Glasgow-Moville-New York. 1902, scrapped [Noel Reginald Pixell Bonsor, North Atlantic Seaway; An Illustrated History of the Passenger Services Linking the Old World with the New (2nd ed.; Jersey, Channel Islands: Brookside Publications), vol. 1 (1975), pp. 294, 295 (photograph), 296, 300, and 318; vol. 2 (1978), pp. 864-865 and 867]. - [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 19 August 1998]


STATE OF PENNSYLVANIA
The "State of Pennsylvania" was built by the London & Glasgow Co., Glasgow as the "Pennsylvania" for the State Steamship Co.,Ltd. She was a 2,472 gross ton ship, length 331.5ft x beam 36.3ft, one funnel, three masts, iron construction, single screw and a speed of 12 knots. There was accommodation for 65-1st, 35-intermediate and 400-3rd class passengers. Launched on 12/2/1873, she sailed from Glasgow on her maiden voyage to Larne (Ireland) and New York on 18/4/1873. In December 1873 she was renamed "State of Pennsylvania" to avoid confusion with other ships and commenced her first voyage Glasgow - Larne - New York under this name on 19/12/1873. On 27/3/1891 she commenced her last voyage Glasgow - Moville - New York, and then went to the Allan Line, but did not run for them. In 1893 she went to a Turkish company and was renamed "Medina" and in 1900 was resold and renamed "Marmara"(Turkish). On 5/9/1915 she was reported sunk by Russian destroyers off Kefken. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.2, p.865] There is a picture of this ship in North Atlantic Seaway, vol.2, p.863. [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 29 October 1997]


STATE OF VIRGINIA
See VIRGINIA (1).


STATIUS JANSEN
See PELDALE.


STAVANGER
In the Lloyd's Register of Shipping I found the following :STAVANGER: Call sign : JWRM. Master : P. Lange. Rigging : Steel single screw Schooner with 1 deck and awning deck. Tonnage : 331 tons gross, 143 under deck and 195 net. Dimensions : 130.4 feet long, 21.7 foot beam and holds 9.6 feet deep. House on Deck 24 tons. Built : in 1897 by Stavanger Stoberi & Dok. in Stavanger. Propulsion : Triple-expansion engine with 3 cylinders of 13 in., 22 in. and 34 in. diameter Respectively. 58 nominal horsepower. Engine built by Laxevaags Msk & Jrns. In Bergen.. Owners : Stavangerske Dampskibsselskab. Port of registry : Stavanger. Flag : Norwegian - [Posted to The ShipsList by Gilbert Provost - 29 September 1998]


STAVANGERFJORD
The "Stavangerfjord" was a well known vessel belonging to the Norwegian American line. Built be Cammel Laird & Co, Birkenhead in 1917, she was a 12,977 gross ton vessel, length overall 553ft x beam 64.2ft, two funnels, two masts, twin screw and a speed of 16 knots. Accommodation for 88-1st, 318-2nd, and 820-3rd class passengers. Launched on 21/5/1917, she sailed on her maiden voyage from Birkenhead on 29/4/1918 to New York, where she was laid up. On 11/9/1918 she sailed from New York to Christiania [Oslo] and in October made her first run from Christiania to Christiansand, Stavanger, Bergen and New York. In 1924, she was converted to fuel oil and her accommodation altered to carry cabin class and 3rd class passengers. In 1930 she was rebuilt again to carry 147 cabin class, 207 tourist class and 820-3rd class passengers. In 1938 she was modernised and on 9/12/1939 commenced her last voyage from New York to Bergen and Oslo where she was laid up. In 1940 after the German invasion of Norway, she was used as a depot ship and in 1945 was used as a troopship between Norway and New York. In 1946 she was refitted to carry 122-1st, 222-cabin and 335-tourist class and on 31/5/1946 resumed the Oslo - Bergen - New York service. On 9/12/1953 her rudder carried away in mid-Atlantic and she was escorted to Oslo. In 1956, she was refitted and her tonnage increased to 14,015 gross tons and accommodation altered to carry 66-1st, 184-cabin and 402-tourist class passengers. On 18/11/1963 she left Oslo on her last voyage to Copenhagen, Stavanger, New York, Bergen and Oslo. Scrapped in 1964 at Hong Kong. There is a photograph of her in North Atlantic Seaway Vol.4, p. 1436 by N.R.P.Bonsor. [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Ted Finch - 10 September 1997]


STEEL ARTISAN
See FAIRSKY.


STEFAN BATORY
The Lloyd Register of Shipping for 1970-71 gives the following details : Stefan Batory ex. Maasdam-1968 (Holland America Line) Official No : 5216147. Call sign : SPYM. Steamship with accommodation for 783 passengers. Equipped with Direction Finder, Echo Sounding Device, Gyroscope, Position Finding Device, Radar, Radio Telephone on medium, high and very high frequencies (MF-HF-VHF). Owned by the Polish Government and operated by Polish Ocean Lines. Port of registry : Gdynia. Flag : Polish. Built in 1952 by N.V. Wilton-Fijenoor in Schiedam. Overall length : 503 ft. 4 in. Extreme breadth : 69 ft. 2 in. Maximum draught : 28 ft. 9 in. Bridge deck and Forecastle : 441 ft. long each. 2 decks, 3rd deck clear of machinery space, 4th deck in No. 1 and 2 holds. 8 bulkheads, rise of floor : 6 inches. Riveted and welded construction. 1,533 tons of Water Ballast, including forward Deep Tank of 168 tons. 3 holds with refrigerated cargo installations. Grain capacity 93,670 cu. ft. Bale capacity 79,695 cu.ft. Insulated space capacity 15,250 cu. ft. 3 steel hatchways of 20 ft., 27 ft., 25 ft. X 18 ft. respectively. 2 cranes of 3 tons capacity each. 2 steam turbines, double reduction gearing to the screw shaft. Speed 16 knots. 9,350 shaft horsepower. 1,787 tons oil fuel. Engines made in 1945 and fitted in 1952 by General Electric Co. of Erie, PA. 2 Water Tube Boilers operating at 525 lbs pressure and Superheater working at 470 lbs pressure. Heating surface of 15,408 sq. ft. Boilers made in 1946 and fitted in 1952. 5 electric generators of 250 KW, 220 V d.c. The Lloyd Register for 1987-88 lists her as owned by Erne Compania Maritima S.A. of Panama. This is the last year she was listed. - [Posted to The ShipsList by Gilbert Provost - 5 June 1998]


STEINMANN
The "Steinmann" was built for the White Cross Line of Antwerp by Wigham Richardson & Co, Walker-on-Tyne (engines by Thompson, Boyd & Co, Newcastle) in 1872. She was a 1,263 gross ton ship, length 223.2ft x beam 29.6ft, iron construction, single screw and a speed of 10 knots. She started her maiden voyage from Antwerp to New York on 12/10/1872 and her last voyage on this route on 8/2/1877. The company acquired the "Khedive" from A.Smyers & Cie, Antwerp in 1877 and handed over the "Steinmann" in part exchange, which Smyers renamed "Alexandre Smyers". She foundered off Hantsholm, Skaggerak on 18/10/1881. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P. Bonsor, vol.2, p.824] - [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 8 May 1998]


STELLA
The "Stella" was built by Van Vlissingen & Co, Amsterdam in 1871 for the Royal Netherlands Steamship Co, she was a 1,515 gross ton ship, length 253.2ft x beam 33ft, one funnel, three masts, iron construction, single screw and a speed of 10 knots. I have no knowledge of her early career, but on 5/9/1880 she commenced a single round voyage between Genoa, Leghorn and New York. On 24/3/1881 she started the first of 13 voyages between Amsterdam and New York, the last one commencing 3/1/1883. Fitted with triple expansion engines in 1896 and scrapped in 1908. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P. Bonsor, vol.3, p.1068-9] - [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 28 June 1998]


STERLING (1)
The "Sterling (1)" was a 1,047 gross ton ship, built by S &H.Morton & Co, Leith in 1890 for the Steamship Company Faerder Ltd of Oslo. Her details were - length 210ft x beam 30.1ft x depth 21.3ft, one funnel, two masts, single screw and a speed of 12 knots. Launched on 16.9.1890, she sailed on the Oslo - Newcastle service. In 1906 the company was sold to Fred Olsen Line and the "Sterling" was sold later the same year to Damps Thore, Copenhagen. In 1915 she was resold to Rederi Aktiebolaget Artemis, Stockholm and renamed "Themis" and in 1917 went to the Icelandic government. She reverted to her previous name of "Sterling" and on 1.5.1922 was wrecked at Seydisfjord. [A Century of North Sea Passenger Steamers by A.Greenway] - [E-mail from Ted Finch - 20 June 1998]


STERLING (2)
The "Sterling (2)" was built by Fredriksstad Mek Verksted, Fredriksstad in 1907 for the Fred Olsen Line. She was a 1,323 gross ton ship, length 231.1ft x beam 34.1ft x depth 22.2ft, one funnel, two masts, single screw and a speed of 13 knots. She was the first Fred Olsen passenger ship built in Norway and was used on their Oslo - Newcastle service (via Arendal). On 25th March 1922 she was wrecked neat Tvedestrand when bound for Newcastle. [A Century of North Sea Passenger Steamers by A.Greenway] - [E-mail from Ted Finch - 20 June 1998]


STIRLING CASTLE (1)
See NORD AMERICA.


STIRLING CASTLE (2)
The "Stirling Castle" was built by Harland & Wolff, Belfast in 1935 for Union Castle Line. She was a 25,554 gross ton vessel, length 725ft, one funnel, two masts and a speed of 20 knots. There was accommodation for 300-1st and 500-cabin class passengers. Launched on 15/7/1935, she commenced her maiden voyage from Southampton to Capetown on 7/2/1936. She made a record voyage from Southampton to Capetown of 13 days 9 hours later the same year, which beat the previous record held since 1893 by the Union Line's "Scot". From 1940 she served as a troopship, steaming 505,000 miles and carrying a total of 128,000 personnel. From 1943 she sailed in the trooping service from the USA and on one voyage carried over 6,000 men. She returned to the mail service in 1947 after reconditioning, with accommodation for 243-1st and 540-tourist class passengers. She continued on the Cape run until her last voyage in 1965 when she arrived at Southampton on 30th November. She carried out cruises for a few weeks and finally left Southampton on 1/2/1966 for Mihara, Japan where she arrived on 3rd March for breaking up .[The Cape Run by W.H.Mitchell & L.A.Sawyer] [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 8 December 1997]


STIRLINGSHIRE
The 1887-88 Lloyd's Register of Shipping offers the following details: Call sign: RBQV Official registration #: 76809. Master: Captain R. Alexander, appointed to the company in 1876 and the ship in 1880. Rigging: iron sail ship; 2 decks; 1 bulkhead cemented. Tonnage: 1,262 tons gross, 1,117 under deck and 1,221 net. Dimensions: 230.8 feet long, 35.8 foot beam and 20.5 feet deep. Poop 44 feet long Forecastle 32 feet long. Built: in 1877 by Birrell, Stenhouse & Co. in Dumbarton.Owners: T. Law and Co. Port of registry: Glasgow. - [Posted to The ShipsList by Gilbert Provost - 13 October 1998]


STOCKHOLM
See POTSDAM .


STRASSBURG
SS STRASSBURG, built in 1872 by Caird & Co., Greenock. 3,025 tons; 106,67 meters (350 feet) long x 11,89 meters (39 feet) broad; straight bow, 1 funnel, 2 masts; iron construction, screw propulsion, service speed 10 knots; accommodation for 60 1st-, 120 2nd-, and 900 3rd-class passengers. 24 May 1872, launched for the North German Lloyd New Orleans service. 3 September 1872, maiden voyage, Bremen-Southampton-New York. 16 October 1872, first voyage, Bremen-Havre-New Orleans. 16 February 1881, first voyage, Bremen-Baltimore. 19 September 1883, last voyage, Bremen-Baltimore. 1883-1896, mainly to South America. 12 August 1893, last voyage, Bremen-New York (12 round-trip voyages). 125 January 1896, last voyage, Bremen-South America. 1896 sold; 1897 scrapped at Genoa [Noel Reginald Pixell Bonsor, North Atlantic Seaway; An Illustrated History of the Passenger Services Linking the Old World with the New (2nd ed.; Jersey, Channel Islands: Brookside Publications), vol. 2 (1978), p. 548].Pictured in Michael J. Anuta, Ships of Our Ancestors (Menominee, MI: Ships of Our Ancestors, 1983; reprint Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., [1993])p. 317, courtesy of the Peabody Essex Museum, East India Square, Salem, MA 01970 [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 28 July 1997]


STUART PRINCE (of 1893)
See PRINCE LINE FREIGHTERS


STUTTGART (1)
The "Stuttgart" was built by Fairfield Co Ltd, Glasgow in 1889 for Norddeutscher Lloyd [North Germen Lloyd]. This was a 5,048 gross ton ship, length 415ft x beam 48ft, one funnel, two masts, single screw and a speed of 13 knots. Accommodation was provided for 44-1st, 36-2nd and 1,955-3rd class passengers. Launched on 26/10/1889, she left Bremen on her maiden voyage to Montevideo and Buenos Aires on 10/1/1890. On 28/8/1890 she commenced her first Bremen - Baltimore voyage and on 11/1/1891 her first Bremen - New York voyage. Her first Bremen - Australia via Suez voyage commenced on 1/7/1896. Her last North Atlantic voyage started on 3/12/1899 when she left Bremen for New York having made a total of 35 round voyages on the N.Atlantic service. On 16/5/1900 she started her first Bremen - Far East run and on 7/4/1903 made her last of 8 round voyages. On 13/7/1904 she started her last Bremen - Australia sailing (9 round voyages) and on 12/1/1907 resumed Bremen - South America sailings. Her final voyage commenced on this service on 14/12/1907 and she was scrapped the following year. [ North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.2,p.554] [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 6 December 1997]


STUTTGART (2)
The "Stuttgart". was built by Vulcan Werke, Stettin in 1923 for North German Lloyd of Bremen, this was a 13,367 gross ton ship, length 537ft x beam 65ft, two funnels, two masts, twin screw and a speed of 15 knots. There was passenger accommodation for 171-1st, 338-2nd and 594-3rd class. Launched on 31/7/1923, she sailed from Bremen on her maiden voyage to New York on 15/1/1924. In November 1927, she was refitted to carry cabin class, tourist third cabin and 3rd class passengers. She made her last Bremen - New York (dep. 26/9/1937)- Bremen voyage in September 1937. In 1938 she was sold to the German Labour Front and was used for "Strength through Joy" cruising with accommodation for 990-single class passengers. Converted to a German Naval Hospital Ship in 1939, she was bombed in Gdynia on 9th October 1943 while filled with wounded German soldiers. She was towed to the outer harbour and deliberately sunk with considerable loss of life. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.2, p.572] [German Ocean Liners of the 20th Century by William H.Miller, p.111] - [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 6 May 1998]

SUCCESS
See HERMANN (2) .


SUD AMERICA
See MENTANA.


SUD AMERICANO
See VANCOUVER ISLAND.


SUEH
See GUGLIELMO PEIRCE.


SUEVIA
The "Suevia" was built by Caird & Co. Greenock, Scotland in 1874 for Hamburg America Line. She was a 3609 gross ton vessel, length 360.3ft x beam 41ft, one funnel, two masts, iron construction, single screw and a speed of 13 knots. There was accommodation for 100-1st, 70-2nd and 600-3rd class passengers. Launched on 1/6/1874, she sailed from Hamburg on her maiden voyage to Havre and New York on 21/10/1874. She was transferred to the Naples - New York service on 11/4/1894 and ran between Hamburg - New York and Mediterranean ports - New York until 27/10/1894 when she commenced her last Hamburg - New York voyage. On 10/4/1895 she sailed on her last Naples - New York voyage and in 1896 was sold to a French company who renamed her "Quatre Amis". In 1896, she stranded in the River Scheldt, was refloated and scrapped at Marseilles the same year. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.1, p.391] [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Ted Finch - 6 October 1997]

The steamship SUEVIA was built for the Hamburg America Line by Caird & Co, Greenock (ship #180), and launched on 1 June 1874. 3,609 tons; 109,8 x 12,5 meters (length x breadth); straight bow, 1 funnel, 2 masts; iron construction, screw propulsion (double-expansion engines), service speed 13 knots; passenger accommodation: 100 in 1st class, 70 in 2nd class, 600 in steerage; crew of 115. 21 October 1874, maiden voyage, Hamburg-Havre-New York. 1884, new boilers by Reiherstiegwerft. 13 April 1889, in dense fog off the Nantucket lightship, collided with the American pilot schooner COMMODORE BATEMAN, with sank with the loss of 2 lives. 11 April 1894-10 April 1895, 6 roundtrip voyages, Naples-New York. 27 October 1894, last voyage, Hamburg New York. 1896, sold to Schiaffino, Nyer & Siges, Algiers; renamed QUATRE AMIS. 1898, stranded in the River Scheldt; refloated and towed to Marseilles, where she was scrapped [Arnold Kludas and Herbert Bischoff, Die Schiffe der Hamburg- Amerika-Linie, Bd. 1: 1847-1906 (Herford: Koehler, 1979), p. 30 (photograph); Noel Reginald Pixell Bonsor, North Atlantic Seaway; An Illustrated History of the Passenger Services Linking the Old World with the New (2nd ed.; Jersey, Channel Islands: Brookside Publications), vol. 1 (1975), p. 391]. Also pictured in Michael J. Anuta, Ships of Our Ancestors (Menominee, MI: Ships of Our Ancestors, 1983), p. 318, courtesy of the Steamship Historical society of America, Langsdale Library, University of Baltimore, 1420 Maryland Ave., Baltimore, MD 21201. - {Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 11 March 1998]


SUEVIC
The White Star liner "Suevic" was built in 1899 by Harland & Wolff, Belfast for White Star Line's Australia via the Cape service. She was a 12,531 gross ton ship, length 550.2ft x beam 63.3ft, one funnel, four masts, twin screws and a speed of 13.5 knots. Much of her cargo space was refrigerated. There was accommodation for 400-single class passengers. On completion in 1901, the "Suevic" was immediately taken over as a transport for the Boer War and after taking troops to South Africa, continued with the Melbourne, Sydney service. On March 17th 1907, when homeward bound with 382 passengers, she ran aground on Stag Rock near the Lizard in fog. All the passengers were got off safely, and most of the cargo discharged to shallow draught vessels. By 27th March, the weather worsened and it was decided to cut off the forepart of the vessel by the use of a series of small dynamite charges, and salvage the after part of the ship. She was severed just forward of the bridge and the after part was hauled off and towed to Plymouth where a temporary bulkhead was built at it's fore end. She then steamed, stern first to Southampton, where a new 212ft bow section , built in Belfast was fitted. She returned to service in January 1908 and continued this route until 1914, when she became an Australian transport and carried Anzac troops to France and Gallipoli. She was returned to White Star Line in 1920, refitted and resumed her original service in February 1920. She was by now, old and uneconomic and in 1928 was sold to Yngvar Hvistendahl, Finnhval, converted to a whale factory ship and renamed "Skytteren". She worked for several years in the Antarctic and eventually became a war loss in 1942 or 1943. [White Star Liner "Suevic" by J.H.Isherwood, Sea Breezes magazine, Oct 1956] This replacement of the forward section of the ship was quite a famous engineering feat at the time, and your picture is most probably the ship, while in drydock awaiting the fitting of the new fore part at Southampton. [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 10 January 1998]

In 1940, the SKYTTEREN was interned in Goteborg. On 1 April 1942, the vessel attempted to escape to England, but was overtaken by the German navy and scuttled by her crew off Maeskjaer [Arnold Kludas, Die grossen Passagierschiffe der Welt; Eine Dokumentation, Band 1: 1858-1912 (2nd ed.; Oldenburg/Hamburg: Gerhard Stalling, c1972), p. 44]. [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 14 January, 1998]

The "Suevic" was a 12,531 gross ton ship, built in 1900 for the White Star Line by Harland & Wolff, Belfast. Her details were - length 565ft x beam 63.3ft (172.2m x 19.3m), one funnel, four masts, twin screw and a speed of 14 knots. There was capacity for 400-cabin class passengers. Launched on Dec.8th 1900, she started her maiden voyage from Liverpool to Cape Town, Albany, Adelaide, Melbourne and Sydney on 23rd Mar.1901. On 17th Mar.1907 she stranded on the Stag Rock near Lizard Point, Cornwall and broke in two . The after section was salvaged and a new bow section built, and joined at Southampton. She re-entered service in Jan.1908 and in 1914 became a troop transport. On 7th Feb.1920 she resumed the London - Sydney - Melbourne service, was refitted in 1921 to carry 226-2nd class passengers and started her final London - Australia voyage on 14th Apr.1928. In Oct.1928 she was sold to Y.Hvistendahl, Tonsberg, rebuilt as a whale factory ship at Kiel and renamed "Skytteren". In 1940 she was interned at Gothenburg, attempted to break out to England and was surprised by the German Navy on 1st Apr.1942. She was scuttled by her crew off Maseskjaer, Sweden to avoid capture.[Great Passenger Ships of the World by Arnold Kludas, vol.1][North Star to Southern Cross by John M.Maber] - [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 23 August 1998]


SUFFERN
See DE GRASSE.


SUFFOLK
The "Suffolk" of 1922 was a 7,573 gross ton steamship, built in 1902 by John Brown & Co, Clydebank for the Federal Steam Navigation Co. She had accommodation for 24-1st and 200-3rd class passengers, was a twin screw ship with a speed of 13 knots. Federal Line ran a combined service with Houlder Brothers, initially under contract to the New Zealand Government between UK - South Africa - Australia and New Zealand. The "Suffolk" was the first Federal Line ship to be used on this service when she left Liverpool on 15th Oct.1904 for Las Palmas - Capetown - Adelaide - Melbourne - Sydney - Auckland - Wellington - Lyttelton and Port Chalmers. In 1912 the company came under the control of the New Zealand Shipping Co, which in turn came under the control of P&O Line in 1916. The "Suffolk" was sold in 1927-28 and I have no record of her after this. [North Star to Southern Cross by John M.Maber] - [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 10 September 1998]


SUFFREN
See BLUCHER.


SUMATRA (1)
See HUMBOLDT.


SUMATRA (2). See SIBERIA.


SUMNER
See RHAETIA (1).


SUNDANCE
You might say that the S.S. Sundance was one of the ships that was the backbone of the U.S. Merchant Marine Fleet prior to World War Two and was known as the Hog Island Class A ships.There were 110 of the Hog Islander,Class A built at Hog Island, PA (now part of Phila. Airport on the Delaware River) by the American International Shipbuilding Company for the the United States Shipping Board Emergency Fleet Corporation.These vessels were then placed under control of the United States Shipping Board. All of this class vessels being built in the years 1918-1919 and 1920. S.S. Sundance Hull No. 1500 Steel Turbine cargo steamer. Hog Island Class A 410` x 46` x 27.5` Normal 45 man crew Speed 8-10 knots 5590 GRT 3453 NRT Was to be named COCKSPUR, but the name was changed to Sundance while she was being built. Was the 622nd vessel built of this type. Christened October 26,1919. Delivered December 15,1919. The USSB first allocated the vessel to the WARD LINE, which was attempting to operate from the USA to Spain and Brazil. That trade route failed to materialize. The vessel then was placed in operation in the trade between Tampa and Rotterdam by the SHORE LINE Co. of Jacksonville,Fla. In July 1921 the USSB allocated the vessel to the TAMPA INTEROCEAN LINE,which in turn assigned the vessel to the AMERICAN PALMETTO LINE (Charleston S.C.).The vessel was then sold by the USSB to CAROLINA STEAMSHIP CO. of Charleston, S.C. But was turned back to the USSB the same year. The S.S. Sundance operated on the AMERICAN PALMETTO LINE, which was intrusted to the SOUTH ATLANTIC STEAMSHIP Co. (Savannah, Ga.) after the CAROLINA STEAMSHIP Co. went out of business. The ship was bought by the SOUTH ATLANTIC STEAMSHIP CO. in 1928 and her name remained S.S. Sundance.the tonnage was changed to 5183 GRT and 3181 NRT In 1941 the S.S. Sundance was bought by the ALCOA SHIPPING Co. and was renamed to S.S. ALCOA BANNER. Like most all US Flagged vessels the War Shipping Administration (WSA) requisitioned her for war time service in 1941 and was allocated to carry Army cargo during the Second World War. When the war was over the U.S. Army returned the vessel back to the War Shipping Administration in 1946. In May 1946 the vessel was loaded with chemicals and was purposely sunk in the North Sea. The vessel was 27 years old at that time. - [Posted to the ShipsList by Captain C.J.Carroll - 5 April 1998]


SUOMI
See UHLAND.


SUPERIOR
The ship name ""SUPERIOR" was a ship of the J & J Cooke Fleet. She was owned from 1845 to 1856. J & J Cooke operated out of Derry, Ireland, for their North American Route. During the 26 year period , from 1847 to 1867 the firm's passenger fleet served her well, with the SUPERIOR and the ELIZABETH making 16 Atlantic Passenger Crossings. Sickness and shipwreck were 2 hazards faced by passengers. The death rate at sea, during the famine years increased twelve-fold. Ship fever left 60 of the SUPERIOR'S 360 passengers dead before they arrived in Quebec in 1847. [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by M.L. Durse - 5 October 1997]


SURREY
The "Surrey" was built by W.Gray & Co, West Hartlepool in 1881 for the Atlantic Transport Line. She was a 2,949 gross ton ship, length 300ft x beam 40.2ft, straight stem, one funnel, three masts, iron construction, single screw and a speed of 10 knots. Launched on 16/4/1881, she sailed from Barrow on her maiden voyage to New York on 14/8/1881. She made one further round voyage on this route and was then chartered to the Royal Netherlands Steamship Co of Amsterdam. She started her first Amsterdam - New York voyage (with 1,258 steerage passengers) on 2/4/1882 and commenced her seventh and last voyage on this service on 24/1/1883. In 1888 she was renamed "Michigan" for the Atlantic Transport Line and in 1889 was sold to a British company. In 1893 she went to Norwegian owners, and in 1900 came under US ownership and was renamed "Harry Luckenbach". She was torpedoed and sunk by the German submarine U.84 in the Bay of Biscay on 6/1/1918. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.3, p.1086] - [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 7 April 1998]


SUSQUEHANNA
See RHEIN (3) .

A troop ship that carried troops and war brides from France to Newport News, Va. after the war was over in 1919 Several articles I have read indicated this vessel was confiscated some time when the USA entered the First World War.Here name was RHEIN and belonged to the German Steamship Co. North German Lloyd. Her tonnage was 10,000 GRT Apparently she was operated by one or another of the US Army Forces at that time. And when the war was over, she was turned over to what was then known as the U.S.Shipping Board. THe USSB operated the vessel for sometime from New York to Greece and Italy. In May 1920 the USSB signed a contract with a newly formed U.S. Company called U.S. Mail Steamship Co.And at the same time allotted 5 newly built 502 class passeger vessels.And the SUSQUEHANNA to the U.S. Mail Steaamship Co. Which operated on the North Atlantic and the Mediterranean from New York. In July 1921 the U.S. Mail Steamship Co went broke. And the USSB repossed these vessels for finacal reasons.The SUSQUEHANNA must have been taken off this trade.And sent to the U.S. West Coast The SUSQUEHANNA is noted as being also assigned to the Pacfic-Argentine-Brazil Line in October 1920. And operated from the U.S. West Coast to Argentina,and Brazil. This line was apart of the SWAYNE & HOYT INC. group. That operated out of San Francisco. S&H operated this line until 1926. And the USSB then sold this Line to C.R.McCormick & Co. What happend to the SUSQUEHANNA I have not been able to determine as yet.And I have no other info or particulars about the vessel. - [Posted to The ShipsList by Captain C.J.Carroll - 31 March 1998]


SUWANEE
See CITY OF ROME (2)


SVEABORG
See ASSYRIA (2) .


S.V. LUCKENBACH
See OBDAM.


SWEDEN
The "Sweden" was built by Barclay, Curle & Co, Glasgow (engines by G.Clark, Sunderland) in 1869 for the Allan Line's Scandinavian feeder service to Newcastle, from where train services ran to Liverpool and Glasgow. She was a 908 gross ton ship, length 190.4ft x beam 27.7ft, clipper stem, one funnel, three masts, iron construction, single screw and a speed of 10 knots. Launched on 30th Mar.1869, she sailed between Newcastle and Norway. The following year she was transferred, sailing between Leith and Christiania(Oslo), and Leith and Gothenburg in alternate weeks. These feeder services were withdrawn at the end of the 1870 season and on 20th Sept.1870 she commenced her first Glasgow - Quebec - Montreal voyage. Her second voyage on this route commenced 11th Jun.1872 and her fifth and last on 19th Oct.1872. On 20th Oct.1893 she was wrecked near Vaasa, Finland. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P. Bonsor, vol.1, pps.285, 313] - {Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 21 September 1998]


SWITZERLAND
The "Switzerland" was a 2,816 gross ton ship, built by Palmers Shipbuilding & Iron Co, Jarrow-on-Tyne in 1874 for the Red Star Line of Antwerp. Her details were - length 329.4ft x beam 38.6ft, straight stem, one funnel, two masts, iron construction, single screw and a speed of 13 knots. There was accommodation for 70-1st and 800-3rd class passengers. Launched on 17/1/1874, she left Antwerp on her maiden voyage to New York on 24/4/1874. In October 1878 she made her first voyage from Antwerp to Philadelphia. Between 1878 and 1884 she sailed between Antwerp and New York or Philadelphia, and between 1884 and 1904 sailed from Antwerp to Philadelphia, except for one New York voyage in each of 1884, 1886, 1888 and 1901. In 1897 she was refitted to carry 3rd class only and on 26/10/1904 commenced her last voyage from Philadelphia to Antwerp. In 1905 she was sold to Italian owners and renamed "Sansone" and was scrapped in Italy in 1909. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.2,p.851] - [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 9 February 1998]

The steamship SWITZERLAND was built for the Red Star Line by Palmers Shipbuilding & Iron Co, Jarrow-on-Tyne, and launched on 17 January 1874. 2,816 tons; 100,39 x 11,76 meters/329.4 x 38.6 feet (length x breadth); straight bow, 1 funnel, 2 masts; iron construction, screw propulsion, service speed 13 knots; accommodation for 70 passengers in 1st class and 800 in steerage. 24 April 1874, maiden voyage, Antwerp-New York. October 1878, first voyage, Antwerp-Philadelphia. 1878-1884, Antwerp-New York or Philadelphia. 1884-1904, Antwerp-Philadelphia except 1 roundtrip voyage to New York in 1884, 1886, 1888, and 1901. 1897 (approximately), 3rd class only. 26 October 1904, last voyage, Philadelphia-Antwerp. 1905, SANSONE (Italian). 1909, scrapped in Italy [Noel Reginald Pixell Bonsor, North Atlantic Seaway; An Illustrated History of the Passenger Services Linking the Old World with the New (2nd ed.; Jersey, Channel Islands: Brookside Publications), vol. 2 (1977), pp. 831 (photograph), 852]. Also pictured in Michael J. Anuta, Ships of Our Ancestors (Menominee, MI: Ships of Our Ancestors, 1983), p. 319, courtesy of the Peabody Essex Museum, East India Square, Salem, MA 01970. - [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 10 February 1998]


SYLVANIA
The "Sylvania" was built by John Brown & Co Ltd, Glasgow in 1956 for the Cunard Line. She was a 21,989 gross ton ship, length overall 608.3ft x beam 80.3ft, one funnel, one mast, twin screw and a speed of 21 knots. She was fitted with stabilisers and had accommodation for 154-1st and 714-tourist class passengers. Launched on 22nd Nov.1956, she sailed on her maiden voyage from Greenock to Quebec and Montreal on 5th Jun.1957. On 26th Jun.1957 she started her first Liverpool - Greenock - Quebec - Montreal voyage and on 28th Nov.1958 her first Liverpool - Cobh - Halifax - New York voyage. She made the last voyage of Cunard's service from Liverpool to Cobh and New York on 24th Nov.1966. Her last Southampton - Quebec - Montreal - Greenock - Liverpool sailing commenced on 20th Oct.1967 and her last regular passenger sailing was on 30th Nov.1967 when she left Liverpool for Halifax, New York, Halifax, Cobh, Havre and Southampton. She was subsequently used for cruising until making her last Cunard sailing on 24th Apr.1968 when she left Gibraltar for Southampton. Sold to Fairwind Shipping Corp, Monrovia she was renamed "Fairwind" and was intended for the Southampton - New Zealand service of the Sitmar Line but was laid up at Southampton. In 1970 she arrived at Trieste for conversion to a cruise liner and in 1977, after further rebuilding to 16,667 tons was used for cruising from US ports. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P. Bonsor, vol.1, p.172] [Great Passenger Ships of the World by Arnold Kludas, vols 5 & 6] I don't have any later info on this ship, but there are excellent photos in Great Passenger Ships of the World by Kludas, vols 5 & 6 ISBN 0-85059-265-8 and 0-85059-747-1 - [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 23 August 1998]


SYLVIA
See VENUS.


SYLVIE DE GRASSE
The sailing ship "Sylvie [occasionally: Silvie] de Grasse", built in 1833 by D. & H. Burgess, of Hartford, Ct., for the "Old Line" (later called the "Union Line") of sailing packets between New York and Le Havre. She was 641 tons, length 140 feet 6 inches long, beam 31 feet 8 inches, depth of hold 15 feet 10 inches, and was named after Sylvie de Grasse, daughter of the French admiral who had made possible the American victory at Yorktown, and wife of Francis Depau, a native of Bayonne, France, who had emigrated to the United States by way of Haiti, and was the co-founder and principal owner of the "Old Line". The vessel was sold for California in 1848, and in September 1849 struck and sank at the mouth of the Columbia River with nearly a half million feet of lumber aboard [Robert Greenhalgh Albion, Square-Riggers on Schedule; The New York Sailing Packets to England, France, and the Cotton Ports (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1938), pp. 104, 284].
As a New York-Havre packet, the Sylvie de Grasse sailed not to Boston but to New York [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 14 July 1997]


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